With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: The Price of Fame

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility: The Price of FameRespect is earned, not given

As I sit here, just having conquered my first run-in with In-N-Out Burger (Animal Style of course) – I’ve been pondering a question that seems to be reoccurring around the web and here on my own blog. ‘Should we hold celebrities and public figures to a higher standard’? Beyond that point, I’ve been thinking about this platform we put people on – is it about publicity and fame? Or is it a matter of respect? Do we expect more of people we respect, we look up to, and those that we love? Do ‘public’ (I use the term public loosely because it can me a lot of different things) figures assume additional accountability and responsibility with their added fame, or should the be treated the same as you and me.

Recently, there has been a lot of back-and-forth discussion on this topic. Take the Penelope Trunk incident from last week - there was a huge uproar in response to her actions – some called her brilliant, others called her crazy, but people had extremely passionate opinionated thoughts on what she did and how she handled her confrontation with David. Why were people so invested in that conversation? What compelled people to defend her or speak against her so passionately? Is it because she is a well established writer and has a huge following amongst bloggers, something she has worked for years to accomplish? Yes – but with that fame she has built for herself, she brings an added representation. She is not only the face of her own personal brand, but of her company, Brazen Careerist, and for an entire generation she targets in her writing. Is that added accountability deserved?

Look at the situation with Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson – in the world of sports last week, there was controversy regarding the way Tiger Woods carried himself after losing the Masters – hardly looking into the camera as the reporter asked him about his play – clearly very angry, while Mickelson handled defeat with a smile on his face and an appreciation of his situation in life. Why was there such a dispute over Woods’ demeanor? I believe it comes down to respect – Woods is the best at what he does, he is put up on a pedestal that he has to live up to each and every day. It can where on a person, but like it or not, the added criticism and judgment comes with entering into the public light. As someone who is respected throughout his sport and the community, we expect more from him as a person, a person who will put a smile on his face and handle every situation with class. This may be an impossible request on our part, but it’s the expectation that we place on these high-profile personas.

What some of you had to say:

  • @norcross - “It depends on if they are in the public by choice (yes), or if the public put them there against their will (no).”
  • @jwschiff – “Not to higher moral standard, but to same standard we expect of others in society. However behavior should not impede their work!”
  • @ParalegalKris – “While I think every American should hold themselves to a high standard, public figures need to live up to that standard. They have a lot of sway over young, impressionable (or even not young, but still impressionable) minds. Their words and actions have a greater impact.”
  • @lilaclupin – “They definitely need to think carefully about what they say/write/do in the public eye when people look to them for guidance…just think PT. In the words of one much wiser than I, with great power comes great responsibility.”

Holding yourself to a higher standard

I firmly believe that the platform we put people on is based on our level of respect for them. Think about the people you love – take your parents for example – you respect them, you look up to them for guidance and support – when they let you down, when they do something you don’t agree with, your reaction is much greater than it would be for a complete stranger. To you, personally, they’ve put themselves in a position where you expect more from them because they are important in your life. Now translate that over to these ‘celebrity’ figures – while we may not have an intimate connection with them, we have a transparent look into their lives – we then compare them to our own personal views on right and wrong, and when they do something to either go along with or against our own perspective, we are quick to pass judgement. For whatever reason, we expect more of ‘famous’ people. We’re thinking ‘they must be pretty amazing to have gotten to where they are today, surely they would not do ______ (fill in the blank).

We all have to constantly be aware of our audience. Accountability for our actions is something that each and every one of us, public figure or not, must be mindful of. If everyone was a little more self-aware, if we held OURSELVES to a higher standard, the world would be a much better place. Regardless of who we are, at the very least, we represent ourselves – so you have to ask yourself, how do you want to be seen by others?

Who is someone you genuinely respect? What are your thoughts on placing higher moral standards to celebrities and public figures? Do we set ridiculous standards for these high-profile individuals that can never be fully realized?

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Carlos Miceli April 21, 2009 at 4:02 am

It’s hard to leave a polemic response, since i agree with most of what you say Matt. Uncle Ben had it right.

This happens mostly a lot in the Media Industry. That’s why i don’t respect Jerry Springer for example, because he’s not “selling” anything positive. He’s just selling what, well, sells.

No, we are not setting ridiculous standards. They are completely capable of reaching these standards. Justifying them, means enabling them. There are a lot of famous people who are responsible. Look at Hugh Jackman and his charity contest on Twitter.

I genuinely respect Seth Godin, if we’re talking about famous people. When it comes to my everyday social media life, I genuinely respect Akhila Kolisetty, Jenny Blake, Susan Pogorselzki, Meghan Kathleen, Tom Ewing and Ruby Ku, just to name a few. And above all, I respect my grandfather the most.

Nice one Matt, you’re doing great.

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Matt April 21, 2009 at 10:45 pm

@Carlos – agreeing with me is always fine, great minds think alike, right? You mention several ‘real life’ people that you respect – I use that term to distinguish them as non-celebrities. Do you hold them to a higher standard because your respect for them is so great? Say Akhila or Susan (just using you as an example ladies) posted something racist and hateful – would you be MORE disappointed and upset because of your respect for them? Are your expectations raised? Do we raise our expectations for people we respect, regardless of public status?

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Carlos Miceli April 21, 2009 at 11:25 pm

Great question.

I would be disappointed but because those people that I admire would be breaking a “pattern”. People that i don’t admire or respect, can’t disappoint me. It’s not about raised expectations, rather than expecting the “usual”.

I don’t admire someone after only 5 minutes, or one tweet, or one post. I admire them after realizing that their responsibility is constant.

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Matt April 27, 2009 at 10:06 pm

I understand where you are coming from – but think about a situation where someone you respect, someone you you thought had ‘constant responsibility’ – think about when they falter, when they let you down, disappoint you. Does it leave MORE of an impact because your respect from them was so high? I think respect and expectations go hand in hand – the more we respect someone, the more critical we become if they really let us down.

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Michael January 12, 2010 at 6:54 am

Just get this one thing straight and I will look up to you. The proper way to write this is as followes: Ready? You and I…. Not you and me! Please take the time to properly address yourself and another. This will make you seem a little more educated.

Thank you.
Michael

Reply

Matt Cheuvront January 12, 2010 at 12:15 pm

Thanks for the heads up – I’ve worked on improving my writing style and skill throughout the tenure of this blog.

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Carlos Miceli April 20, 2009 at 9:02 pm

It’s hard to leave a polemic response, since i agree with most of what you say Matt. Uncle Ben had it right.

This happens mostly a lot in the Media Industry. That’s why i don’t respect Jerry Springer for example, because he’s not “selling” anything positive. He’s just selling what, well, sells.

No, we are not setting ridiculous standards. They are completely capable of reaching these standards. Justifying them, means enabling them. There are a lot of famous people who are responsible. Look at Hugh Jackman and his charity contest on Twitter.

I genuinely respect Seth Godin, if we’re talking about famous people. When it comes to my everyday social media life, I genuinely respect Akhila Kolisetty, Jenny Blake, Susan Pogorselzki, Meghan Kathleen, Tom Ewing and Ruby Ku, just to name a few. And above all, I respect my grandfather the most.

Nice one Matt, you’re doing great.

Reply

Matt April 21, 2009 at 3:45 pm

@Carlos – agreeing with me is always fine, great minds think alike, right? You mention several ‘real life’ people that you respect – I use that term to distinguish them as non-celebrities. Do you hold them to a higher standard because your respect for them is so great? Say Akhila or Susan (just using you as an example ladies) posted something racist and hateful – would you be MORE disappointed and upset because of your respect for them? Are your expectations raised? Do we raise our expectations for people we respect, regardless of public status?

Reply

Carlos Miceli April 21, 2009 at 4:25 pm

Great question.

I would be disappointed but because those people that I admire would be breaking a “pattern”. People that i don’t admire or respect, can’t disappoint me. It’s not about raised expectations, rather than expecting the “usual”.

I don’t admire someone after only 5 minutes, or one tweet, or one post. I admire them after realizing that their responsibility is constant.

Reply

Matt April 27, 2009 at 3:06 pm

I understand where you are coming from – but think about a situation where someone you respect, someone you you thought had ‘constant responsibility’ – think about when they falter, when they let you down, disappoint you. Does it leave MORE of an impact because your respect from them was so high? I think respect and expectations go hand in hand – the more we respect someone, the more critical we become if they really let us down.

Reply

Michael January 11, 2010 at 11:54 pm

Just get this one thing straight and I will look up to you. The proper way to write this is as followes: Ready? You and I…. Not you and me! Please take the time to properly address yourself and another. This will make you seem a little more educated.

Thank you.
Michael

Reply

Matt Cheuvront January 12, 2010 at 5:15 am

Thanks for the heads up – I’ve worked on improving my writing style and skill throughout the tenure of this blog.

Reply

Benjamin Wilcox April 21, 2009 at 2:08 pm

This is a great discussion that spans through a lot of the posts that you have written in the past few weeks. I believe that people in the spotlight have the same amount of accountability as would be expected of myself. If I had written a post like that, I would have been condemned by the two people who actually read my blog. I feel that the only difference in our reactions would have been the number of responses.

One of the important things about the PT situation is that because she is connected to the name Brazen Careerist, she is personally tied to the success or failure of her start-up. It is possible that some people have stopped reading her blog and contributing to her community because of her remarks.

However, there is a large marketing advantage to being controversial. Is there a reason why we can all recall Omarosa’s name without knowing anyone else who was on that season of the Apprentice? Could you say that there are more people drawn to the Brazen community by the controversy than people who have stopped contributing? If the net turnover is positive, I would say that PT has made a good decision.

Getting back to the question at hand, two celebrities that I genuinely respect are Tony Dungy and Michael J. Fox. These people are very clear about their values and do not make excuses for them. They both are very different people and have compelling life stories, their biographies are very interesting. As for people who are not celebrities, I respect the opinion of my immediate family the most. I have several very good friends who have my respect and I also respect all of you who are currently pouring your heart into your blogs.

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Matt April 21, 2009 at 10:53 pm

@Ben – Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I’m glad that you have become a regular here – you always add a lot of value to each discussion.

I somewhat disagree that the expectations would be the same between you and me and a figure like P Trunk – given that she is a ‘public figure’ and represents more than just herself – she has to be MORE cautious of how she reacts to these kind of situations. As you stated, she is the face of an entire community, and while the net turnover may be positive, I’m sure any bridge that is burned is still a bridge burned – a lot of people in our demographic are turned off by the idea of writing simply for the sake of controversy. A lot of people were turned off by MY response to her post, because to some it was viewed as an attack on Penelope to raise controversy (which wasn’t the intent – the big picture was to address the idea of taking criticism as bloggers and writers). A lot of it has to do with the huge following she has established, but some of it has to do with her reputation and what she represents.

You mention two outstanding people, and I am right there with you – especially Tony Dungy. Talk about a class act. I hate the Colts with a passion but he is one of the all time greats – both as a coach and as a human being with clearly defined morals.

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Benjamin April 22, 2009 at 3:03 am

I would say that she would not have to be more cautious about how she reacts based on the brand she has built for herself. One of the big themes in her writing is being honest and expressing her real emotions. I actually believe that some respect her writing with more profanity and controversial topics because they see it as her raw thoughts. It could be seen that she is making every attempt to put her unfiltered thoughts on her blog.

I have since found another person that I respect, if not for his values, for his ownership of the record books: John Wooden. There is a TED talk with him discussing the difference between success and failure. I feel that he has used the great responsibility that came with his power the best he possibly could. (http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/john_wooden_on_the_difference_between_winning_and_success.html)

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Matt April 22, 2009 at 5:40 am

Ben – Wooden is a great guy, I watched that video a couple weeks ago – Rikin (www.rikinontheweb.com) posted a great blog over on his blog discussing this video and measuring success. You should def. check it out!

I think Penelope is a very ‘real’ writer – but I think that particular situation could have been handled a little differently, specifically, his name did not need to be revealed, and the topic could have been addressed on a more ‘objective’ level. Given her position, she has to be careful in being ‘too’ real (that sounds weird even as I say it) – but I think all of us have to filter our own ideas a bit before posting them online, or at the very least, we must be willing to take the criticism for our ‘un-filtered’ thoughts.

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Benjamin Wilcox April 21, 2009 at 7:08 am

This is a great discussion that spans through a lot of the posts that you have written in the past few weeks. I believe that people in the spotlight have the same amount of accountability as would be expected of myself. If I had written a post like that, I would have been condemned by the two people who actually read my blog. I feel that the only difference in our reactions would have been the number of responses.

One of the important things about the PT situation is that because she is connected to the name Brazen Careerist, she is personally tied to the success or failure of her start-up. It is possible that some people have stopped reading her blog and contributing to her community because of her remarks.

However, there is a large marketing advantage to being controversial. Is there a reason why we can all recall Omarosa’s name without knowing anyone else who was on that season of the Apprentice? Could you say that there are more people drawn to the Brazen community by the controversy than people who have stopped contributing? If the net turnover is positive, I would say that PT has made a good decision.

Getting back to the question at hand, two celebrities that I genuinely respect are Tony Dungy and Michael J. Fox. These people are very clear about their values and do not make excuses for them. They both are very different people and have compelling life stories, their biographies are very interesting. As for people who are not celebrities, I respect the opinion of my immediate family the most. I have several very good friends who have my respect and I also respect all of you who are currently pouring your heart into your blogs.

Reply

Matt April 21, 2009 at 3:53 pm

@Ben – Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I’m glad that you have become a regular here – you always add a lot of value to each discussion.

I somewhat disagree that the expectations would be the same between you and me and a figure like P Trunk – given that she is a ‘public figure’ and represents more than just herself – she has to be MORE cautious of how she reacts to these kind of situations. As you stated, she is the face of an entire community, and while the net turnover may be positive, I’m sure any bridge that is burned is still a bridge burned – a lot of people in our demographic are turned off by the idea of writing simply for the sake of controversy. A lot of people were turned off by MY response to her post, because to some it was viewed as an attack on Penelope to raise controversy (which wasn’t the intent – the big picture was to address the idea of taking criticism as bloggers and writers). A lot of it has to do with the huge following she has established, but some of it has to do with her reputation and what she represents.

You mention two outstanding people, and I am right there with you – especially Tony Dungy. Talk about a class act. I hate the Colts with a passion but he is one of the all time greats – both as a coach and as a human being with clearly defined morals.

Reply

Benjamin April 21, 2009 at 8:03 pm

I would say that she would not have to be more cautious about how she reacts based on the brand she has built for herself. One of the big themes in her writing is being honest and expressing her real emotions. I actually believe that some respect her writing with more profanity and controversial topics because they see it as her raw thoughts. It could be seen that she is making every attempt to put her unfiltered thoughts on her blog.

I have since found another person that I respect, if not for his values, for his ownership of the record books: John Wooden. There is a TED talk with him discussing the difference between success and failure. I feel that he has used the great responsibility that came with his power the best he possibly could. (http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/john_wooden_on_the_difference_between_winning_and_success.html)

Reply

Matt April 21, 2009 at 10:40 pm

Ben – Wooden is a great guy, I watched that video a couple weeks ago – Rikin (www.rikinontheweb.com) posted a great blog over on his blog discussing this video and measuring success. You should def. check it out!

I think Penelope is a very ‘real’ writer – but I think that particular situation could have been handled a little differently, specifically, his name did not need to be revealed, and the topic could have been addressed on a more ‘objective’ level. Given her position, she has to be careful in being ‘too’ real (that sounds weird even as I say it) – but I think all of us have to filter our own ideas a bit before posting them online, or at the very least, we must be willing to take the criticism for our ‘un-filtered’ thoughts.

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Mark Lewis April 21, 2009 at 2:51 pm

Most people pass judgment about famous people based on their own beliefs and morals. It is fairly simple for an individual to do this; most people connect on a one-to-one relationship, but famous peoples’ relationships are one-to-many. In other words, it’s easy to compare a famous person to another individual but it’s very difficult to compare a famous person to society. Unfortunately, we do just that. We hold famous people to the expectations of society, a melting pot of beliefs and morals, which inherently leads to debate.

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Matt April 21, 2009 at 11:08 pm

@Mark – Man, your comment here has opened up my mind to a whole new way of thinking. We are holding these public figures to hold the expectations of society, which means different things to different people. It’s almost seems like no matter how a public figure acts in a situation, there is going to be someone there to criticize and judge. In that sense, a public figure can’t really always ‘do the right thing’ but rather do what they think is right and hope that the majority of society agrees with them.

Very interesting insight into this topic Mark.

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Mark Lewis April 21, 2009 at 7:51 am

Most people pass judgment about famous people based on their own beliefs and morals. It is fairly simple for an individual to do this; most people connect on a one-to-one relationship, but famous peoples’ relationships are one-to-many. In other words, it’s easy to compare a famous person to another individual but it’s very difficult to compare a famous person to society. Unfortunately, we do just that. We hold famous people to the expectations of society, a melting pot of beliefs and morals, which inherently leads to debate.

Reply

Matt April 21, 2009 at 4:08 pm

@Mark – Man, your comment here has opened up my mind to a whole new way of thinking. We are holding these public figures to hold the expectations of society, which means different things to different people. It’s almost seems like no matter how a public figure acts in a situation, there is going to be someone there to criticize and judge. In that sense, a public figure can’t really always ‘do the right thing’ but rather do what they think is right and hope that the majority of society agrees with them.

Very interesting insight into this topic Mark.

Reply

Mandy April 21, 2009 at 10:49 pm

The only people who I place a higher standard for is, believe it or not, politicians. I’m a political scientist by training and it is my firm belief is that if politicians want to be taken seriously, they have live and abide by a higher standard otherwise they have no call representing the rest of us. I can be more forgiving of some failings but less so for major ones.

I’m more willing to forgive other high-profile people their pitfalls since what they do doesn’t adversely affect me either directly or indirectly unless it’s relevant to me but then I’d probably pick my role models a little more carefully afterwards.

Also, in this same line of thought, many of us also don’t have a direct line to these people. We only see and interact with them through the frame of the media lens and we only see what they choose to let us see. Most people do not read the newspaper critically (or if they do, it’s through their own lenses) and what they see is what is often believed regardless of what is said in between the lines or not said at all.

I tend to genuinely respect people that I know and like. I’m ambivalent about almost everyone else and I think most people are too. If you know the person, you are able to more effectively weigh their good qualities against their human failings. If you don’t know them, it’s easy to “other” them and see the worse. I think that’s why the PT affair was so split–those who know PT in real life or has direct contact with her defended her; those of us who don’t, gauged her based on her reaction which gave a negative impression. It’s just hard to tell when the only relationship you have with the “other” is through the media, and that includes social media.

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Matt April 21, 2009 at 11:36 pm

@Mandy – You raise a great point that relates to the Penelope Trunk ‘incident’ (I don’t really know what to call it). Those who know her personally were quick to defend her while the rest of us judged her based on societies ‘values’ – her actions classed with our personal beliefs and, since we don’t know her personally, that’s all we had to base our judgment from. You can discount this as these people are her ‘friends’ so they are obviously going to support her, but I think it says something about society’s quickness to put people into that ‘other’ category you mention.

I think, in the end, if we spent more time on how we represent ourselves, and less time on judging others actions, things would be a lot simpler and the world would probably be a better place.

To your point – politicians are going to be judged with an extremely critical lens, by all parties. I agree with your assessment in that these figures must be much more self-aware than the average person, because of their responsibility to society to uphold the law, positive moral values, et cetera. These individuals assume that responsibility and are aware that every move they make, every step they take, someone will be watching.

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Mandy April 22, 2009 at 3:22 am

And really, why shouldn’t they be? They’re the ones who control our money, our livelihoods, virtually everything about our everyday lives. That’s a lot of responsibility that requires a great vision and even greater personal integrity. I’ll stop this line of thought because I can talk about politics all day (Yes, I’m one of those people) and this isn’t necessarily the place to do it.

I think your point about self-representation over judgment is good although I would also add that people can and should be critical over the actions of others–otherwise we wouldn’t have a moral ground to stand on. But I get the overall point. Personal integrity without self-righteousness is very important since not everyone will always agree with you and you wouldn’t necessarily want them to.

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Mandy April 21, 2009 at 3:49 pm

The only people who I place a higher standard for is, believe it or not, politicians. I’m a political scientist by training and it is my firm belief is that if politicians want to be taken seriously, they have live and abide by a higher standard otherwise they have no call representing the rest of us. I can be more forgiving of some failings but less so for major ones.

I’m more willing to forgive other high-profile people their pitfalls since what they do doesn’t adversely affect me either directly or indirectly unless it’s relevant to me but then I’d probably pick my role models a little more carefully afterwards.

Also, in this same line of thought, many of us also don’t have a direct line to these people. We only see and interact with them through the frame of the media lens and we only see what they choose to let us see. Most people do not read the newspaper critically (or if they do, it’s through their own lenses) and what they see is what is often believed regardless of what is said in between the lines or not said at all.

I tend to genuinely respect people that I know and like. I’m ambivalent about almost everyone else and I think most people are too. If you know the person, you are able to more effectively weigh their good qualities against their human failings. If you don’t know them, it’s easy to “other” them and see the worse. I think that’s why the PT affair was so split–those who know PT in real life or has direct contact with her defended her; those of us who don’t, gauged her based on her reaction which gave a negative impression. It’s just hard to tell when the only relationship you have with the “other” is through the media, and that includes social media.

Reply

Matt April 21, 2009 at 4:36 pm

@Mandy – You raise a great point that relates to the Penelope Trunk ‘incident’ (I don’t really know what to call it). Those who know her personally were quick to defend her while the rest of us judged her based on societies ‘values’ – her actions classed with our personal beliefs and, since we don’t know her personally, that’s all we had to base our judgment from. You can discount this as these people are her ‘friends’ so they are obviously going to support her, but I think it says something about society’s quickness to put people into that ‘other’ category you mention.

I think, in the end, if we spent more time on how we represent ourselves, and less time on judging others actions, things would be a lot simpler and the world would probably be a better place.

To your point – politicians are going to be judged with an extremely critical lens, by all parties. I agree with your assessment in that these figures must be much more self-aware than the average person, because of their responsibility to society to uphold the law, positive moral values, et cetera. These individuals assume that responsibility and are aware that every move they make, every step they take, someone will be watching.

Reply

Mandy April 21, 2009 at 8:22 pm

And really, why shouldn’t they be? They’re the ones who control our money, our livelihoods, virtually everything about our everyday lives. That’s a lot of responsibility that requires a great vision and even greater personal integrity. I’ll stop this line of thought because I can talk about politics all day (Yes, I’m one of those people) and this isn’t necessarily the place to do it.

I think your point about self-representation over judgment is good although I would also add that people can and should be critical over the actions of others–otherwise we wouldn’t have a moral ground to stand on. But I get the overall point. Personal integrity without self-righteousness is very important since not everyone will always agree with you and you wouldn’t necessarily want them to.

Reply

Sam April 24, 2009 at 9:00 pm

This is a really tough issue, and one that was discussed frequently in my journalism classes in college. For those who choose a career that they know will put them in the spotlight, I think they have to understand the responsibility that comes along with it. Yes, these people are human, but for an actor or a professional athlete who signs a contract with full knowledge that they will be in the public eye, I think they have to acknowledge this to a certain degree. That said, sometimes the standards we set for these people are too high, and they should still be able to live their lives. Great post, Matt!

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Matt April 28, 2009 at 5:39 pm

@Sam – I agree that our standards are a little ridiculous for some – in the end, they are still human. But, as you said, celebrities and public figures know what comes with the spotlight, and have to carry themselves accordingly. They are going to be scrutinized and criticized more often because more people are watching. More people = more opinions = more disagreement = raised expectations. It all goes hand in hand.

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Sam April 24, 2009 at 2:00 pm

This is a really tough issue, and one that was discussed frequently in my journalism classes in college. For those who choose a career that they know will put them in the spotlight, I think they have to understand the responsibility that comes along with it. Yes, these people are human, but for an actor or a professional athlete who signs a contract with full knowledge that they will be in the public eye, I think they have to acknowledge this to a certain degree. That said, sometimes the standards we set for these people are too high, and they should still be able to live their lives. Great post, Matt!

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Matt April 28, 2009 at 10:39 am

@Sam – I agree that our standards are a little ridiculous for some – in the end, they are still human. But, as you said, celebrities and public figures know what comes with the spotlight, and have to carry themselves accordingly. They are going to be scrutinized and criticized more often because more people are watching. More people = more opinions = more disagreement = raised expectations. It all goes hand in hand.

Reply

Anita Lobo July 3, 2009 at 8:26 am

Mark’s insightful comment gets it – fame and recognition derive from the expectations and beliefs of a society – and so will [mis]judgement!

Fame gives recognition, but doesn’t automatically get you respect.

My view is that public figures have a greater responsibility and more at stake when they stumble!

So its more important their conduct begets respect [vs liked/ disliked], both in their public and more importantly, private lives.

The inherent contradiction is that in every age, there are people who will stretch the boundaries of what is acceptable – and I for one am thankful for the comic relief and iconoclasm delivered!

Cheers,

Anita Lobo

Reply

Anita Lobo July 3, 2009 at 1:26 am

Mark’s insightful comment gets it – fame and recognition derive from the expectations and beliefs of a society – and so will [mis]judgement!

Fame gives recognition, but doesn’t automatically get you respect.

My view is that public figures have a greater responsibility and more at stake when they stumble!

So its more important their conduct begets respect [vs liked/ disliked], both in their public and more importantly, private lives.

The inherent contradiction is that in every age, there are people who will stretch the boundaries of what is acceptable – and I for one am thankful for the comic relief and iconoclasm delivered!

Cheers,

Anita Lobo

Reply

Anita Lobo July 3, 2009 at 8:34 am

Talking about the price of fame, there’s an interesting book [old fav] on how counter-culture helps evolve the very mainstream its seeks to change. Useful construct.
Called: Nation of Rebels/ Joseph Heath and Andrew Potter/ Harper Business
Cheers
Anita

Reply

Matt July 3, 2009 at 2:53 pm

@Anita. You’re always good for a book recommendation. I’ve been writing these down as you leave some comments here and there around the site. Anytime you want to send me a ‘reading list’ feel free – I’m more than likely going to be making a lengthy commute to and from downtown Chicago in the not-too-distant future, so a plethora of good reading material is a must!

Reply

Anita Lobo July 3, 2009 at 1:34 am

Talking about the price of fame, there’s an interesting book [old fav] on how counter-culture helps evolve the very mainstream its seeks to change. Useful construct.
Called: Nation of Rebels/ Joseph Heath and Andrew Potter/ Harper Business
Cheers
Anita

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Matt July 3, 2009 at 7:53 am

@Anita. You’re always good for a book recommendation. I’ve been writing these down as you leave some comments here and there around the site. Anytime you want to send me a ‘reading list’ feel free – I’m more than likely going to be making a lengthy commute to and from downtown Chicago in the not-too-distant future, so a plethora of good reading material is a must!

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discount michael kors watches May 12, 2013 at 1:15 am

The writer of the show, Ray McKinnon, was somewhat familiar with my case. His late wife, Lisa Blount was a friend of mine. She and I exchanged letters while I was on death row in Arkansas, and she even sang at a concert in Arkansas, along with Eddie Vedder, Patti Smith, and Johnny Depp, to help raise awareness about my plight.I heard that McKinnon also did research into the cases of other men who had been on death row and had been released or exonerated. It paid off. I can tell you from first hand experience that Rectify is a very realistic show.

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christian louboutin bianca May 12, 2013 at 1:15 am

Rectify is the story of a man who was sentenced to death for a crime he didn’t commit, and spent 19 years on death row before getting out. Much like in my own real life case, the local politicians refuse to admit he’s innocent even after DNA testing points towards someone else. In fact, there was so much about this show that mirrored my own life I began to wonder how much of my story had crept into the script.

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