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Primer Magazine: The Weekly Magazine for Guys Who Want to be Better Men

One of the greatest benefits of being a blog writer and ‘community facilitator’ are the people you meet and relationships you develop.  With these connections comes some pretty outstanding opportunities. Enter Andrew Snavely, founder and editor of Primer Magazine – The Weekly Magazine for Guys Who Want to be Better Men. Andrew came by the blog, liked what he saw, and a couple weeks later I’ve added my first contribution to Primer as a guest columnist.

In short – Primer caters to men within the twenty-something demographic. Think of it as the ‘transition’ between Maxim and GQ. I asked Andrew to give me the Readers Digest version on how Primer came to be and what market they target:

Primer launched May of ’08 and has been growing ever since.  I’ve been really excited with the response it’s received and I look forward to taking it to new levels.  I’m in my mid-20’s and the idea really came out of graduating college several years ago.  When you’re in college, everyone has an answer to your questions and there are people set up to help you along your path to graduation.  But as soon as you graduate you’re on your own. Alone, but expected to act as a functioning adult, and for guys as responsible men.

My other frustration as a long time reader of men’s magazines was feeling like no one was speaking to ME.  As you may have read on the About page, Maxim is clearly for horny high school guys and GQ / Esquire is clearly for guys in their early 30’s who have established themselves and have money to drop on $400 shoes.  While I do still enjoy reading those magazines, they’re not catered to me: mid-20’s post-college guy just getting started. Primer Magazine caters to men in this ‘transitional’ phase of life.

As online journalists – we’re always up for a new challenge. Writing for Primer allows me to connect with my male brethren in new an unique ways. If Life Without Pants is my day job, Primer is a Sunday afternoon football game at the local pub. Guys being guys – but growing and learning a lot from one another.

I encourage you all to head over to Primer Magazine’s website to check out my inaugural post – The Four Agreements: Toltec Wisdom and the Modern Man. As much as the magazine may be catered toward men – there is honestly something for everyone in this article on how to live a more fulfilling life. I’m extremely proud of this article and I’m thrilled to share it with all of you.

Just another side project in the life of Matt Cheuvront – and yet another reason I love the web, social media, and it’s ability to bring innovative thinkers together. I leave you with a snippet from my first (of many) articles for Primer, and I look forward to the discussion over there and back here. Cheers!

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The Four Agreements: Toltec Wisdom and the Modern Man (by Matt Cheuvront)

…Since then, The Four Agreements has sat next to my bed, much like you would find a bible in a hotel room. In a way, it has become a ‘bible’ for the way I strive to live my life. I shouldn’t complain about where I’m at right now. I’m engaged, I’ve got a good job, a salary, and 401k with benefits. But for some reason, I’m not comfortable with being content – this isn’t where I want to be – I want more. So I’m going against what’s ‘right’ and what ‘makes sense’ — quitting my job, packing my bags, and moving to Chicago with my fiancé to start our life together. It’s scary, hell, it’s downright terrifying. There’s a lot of adversity in front of me, there are far more questions than there are answers, but through it all, I come back to these four ‘agreements’ that continue to serve as the foundation of my attitude toward life…

Check out the full article HERE

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16 Comments

    • Thanks Stuart – Primer has definitely established a niche in the market – targeting ‘guys like us’ – the one’s who want a little more than scantly clad women and drinking game rules, but aren’t quite ready for Armani suits and retirement advice.

    • Thanks Stuart – Primer has definitely established a niche in the market – targeting ‘guys like us’ – the one’s who want a little more than scantly clad women and drinking game rules, but aren’t quite ready for Armani suits and retirement advice.

  1. Congratulations on finding this opportunity! You both are right, Primer seems to have found an audience that looking for something a bit different than Maxim and GQ. I have just added Primer to my RSS feed and I am looking forward to more updates both from Primer itself and ones authored by you, personally. Magazines like Primer are the future of online content sharing and are beneficial for those trying to weed the good articles out from the bad.

    The connection you two have made is a great example of what is possible when using social media and blogging to their full potential!

  2. Congratulations on finding this opportunity! You both are right, Primer seems to have found an audience that looking for something a bit different than Maxim and GQ. I have just added Primer to my RSS feed and I am looking forward to more updates both from Primer itself and ones authored by you, personally. Magazines like Primer are the future of online content sharing and are beneficial for those trying to weed the good articles out from the bad.

    The connection you two have made is a great example of what is possible when using social media and blogging to their full potential!

  3. OK, looks like I’m going to be the first girl to post here, so I’ll just put my manly-ish hat on and burp a bit while I type this (kidding.)

    I might not want to “be a better man”, but still, your post is also applicable to being a better woman, being a better person in general. I wrote a whole post recently on this feeling of complacency, being stuck in a big safe rut, and always wanting more when your life is already full of good salaries and happy functioning relationships and cable and glittering unicorns and all that other great stuff. But yet, sometimes contentment is so damn unsatisfying and I want to know why that is. I tend to blame it on the quarter life crisis (which, inevitably, happens to me more often than not, and I’m always relapsing again and again, trying to “rediscover” myself and look outside my little pristine everything’s-perfect snow globe of a world, searching for a piece of hope and excitement in a pile of dirt or something. Sure, dirt is messy, but digging for something is the guilty pleasure because life isn’t about perfection, and unfortunately I don’t think you realize this until you’ve pretty much checked all your life to-dos off your ginormous life to-do list (college degree, check. Good job, check. Liking what you do? Extra points. Functioning relationship, check. Engaged? Bonus! Nice place to live, check.) Then, you start to realize gee, maybe the fun and passion and brilliance in life is all in the “getting there”, and maybe you should’ve paid more attention when you were on the journey because true happiness really doesn’t lie in the reveling in satisfaction that comes with achieving each great life milestone.

    Sometimes I feel like I’m living backwards. I’m 28, and I feel like I should be at my prime now – the fullest, happiest, most confident, content version of myself. I have everything I’ve ever strived for, but I’m always feeling like “something” is missing. I think I was a lot more “me” when I didn’t know what or where or how I was going to end up. I was like a big ball of playdough, I could be whoever I wanted to be because nothing was really defining me. It’s kind of ironic that the definition of self doesn’t necessarily lie in your accomplishments but moreso in the journey, the striving, all those little moments along the way that when strung together make something greater than the end result.

    So in short, I admire you Matt for leaving it all – abandoning contentment for another exciting and unpredictable journey of self discovery. That takes guts! You and Jamie Varon are really testing me this week – you’re both making me want to just say screw it all, I’m going to start all over and rediscover my self and my life and what I want, all over again. Who says everything has to be predictable and bland and safe? Sometimes what you don’t know will actually save you in the end.

    • Glittering unicorns? I think if my old life would have had that I might have thought twice about taking this leap! :)

      In all seriousness – you and I are on the same page. It’s a weird paradox because honestly, there is comfort in complacency. Having an apathetic outlook on life is boring, but it’s safe. You don’t have to worry about having a roof over your head, you get a steady paycheck, maybe three months from now you can buy that big screen TV you’ve always wanted – just have to budget it in. The routine comes so routine that you almost forget what anything else would even be like. (I’m going to drop this point because my post tomorrow talks about this exact thought).

      Reading you say that you admire me and what I’m doing leaves me at a loss. Is what I’m doing truly admirable? Or am I just bat-shit crazy? Some would probably side with the latter. In the end, it’s not about doing what most people will think you are brilliant for, it’s about living your life for you. You’re going to piss some people off, there are those who will lose faith in everything you are – but in the end, if you’re determined, you’ll be on the other end proving all the naysayers that they were wrong. This time, chaos and anarchy overcame the established order. I cheated the system, broke the rules, and came out on top.

      Think long and hard about taking that leap. Think about what’s holding you back and then think about if it’s REALLY holding you back. I’m 23 years old – I don’t have a lot of commitments at this point, no family to consider, no long-term career to let go of. So for me, the only thing holding me back was myself. For the first time in my life I’m defying my own common sense, and I have to say, it feels pretty good.

      Thanks so much for the comment Kerri!

  4. OK, looks like I’m going to be the first girl to post here, so I’ll just put my manly-ish hat on and burp a bit while I type this (kidding.)

    I might not want to “be a better man”, but still, your post is also applicable to being a better woman, being a better person in general. I wrote a whole post recently on this feeling of complacency, being stuck in a big safe rut, and always wanting more when your life is already full of good salaries and happy functioning relationships and cable and glittering unicorns and all that other great stuff. But yet, sometimes contentment is so damn unsatisfying and I want to know why that is. I tend to blame it on the quarter life crisis (which, inevitably, happens to me more often than not, and I’m always relapsing again and again, trying to “rediscover” myself and look outside my little pristine everything’s-perfect snow globe of a world, searching for a piece of hope and excitement in a pile of dirt or something. Sure, dirt is messy, but digging for something is the guilty pleasure because life isn’t about perfection, and unfortunately I don’t think you realize this until you’ve pretty much checked all your life to-dos off your ginormous life to-do list (college degree, check. Good job, check. Liking what you do? Extra points. Functioning relationship, check. Engaged? Bonus! Nice place to live, check.) Then, you start to realize gee, maybe the fun and passion and brilliance in life is all in the “getting there”, and maybe you should’ve paid more attention when you were on the journey because true happiness really doesn’t lie in the reveling in satisfaction that comes with achieving each great life milestone.

    Sometimes I feel like I’m living backwards. I’m 28, and I feel like I should be at my prime now – the fullest, happiest, most confident, content version of myself. I have everything I’ve ever strived for, but I’m always feeling like “something” is missing. I think I was a lot more “me” when I didn’t know what or where or how I was going to end up. I was like a big ball of playdough, I could be whoever I wanted to be because nothing was really defining me. It’s kind of ironic that the definition of self doesn’t necessarily lie in your accomplishments but moreso in the journey, the striving, all those little moments along the way that when strung together make something greater than the end result.

    So in short, I admire you Matt for leaving it all – abandoning contentment for another exciting and unpredictable journey of self discovery. That takes guts! You and Jamie Varon are really testing me this week – you’re both making me want to just say screw it all, I’m going to start all over and rediscover my self and my life and what I want, all over again. Who says everything has to be predictable and bland and safe? Sometimes what you don’t know will actually save you in the end.

    • Glittering unicorns? I think if my old life would have had that I might have thought twice about taking this leap! :)

      In all seriousness – you and I are on the same page. It’s a weird paradox because honestly, there is comfort in complacency. Having an apathetic outlook on life is boring, but it’s safe. You don’t have to worry about having a roof over your head, you get a steady paycheck, maybe three months from now you can buy that big screen TV you’ve always wanted – just have to budget it in. The routine comes so routine that you almost forget what anything else would even be like. (I’m going to drop this point because my post tomorrow talks about this exact thought).

      Reading you say that you admire me and what I’m doing leaves me at a loss. Is what I’m doing truly admirable? Or am I just bat-shit crazy? Some would probably side with the latter. In the end, it’s not about doing what most people will think you are brilliant for, it’s about living your life for you. You’re going to piss some people off, there are those who will lose faith in everything you are – but in the end, if you’re determined, you’ll be on the other end proving all the naysayers that they were wrong. This time, chaos and anarchy overcame the established order. I cheated the system, broke the rules, and came out on top.

      Think long and hard about taking that leap. Think about what’s holding you back and then think about if it’s REALLY holding you back. I’m 23 years old – I don’t have a lot of commitments at this point, no family to consider, no long-term career to let go of. So for me, the only thing holding me back was myself. For the first time in my life I’m defying my own common sense, and I have to say, it feels pretty good.

      Thanks so much for the comment Kerri!

  5. Sweet new gig! I really enjoyed this post. You’re right that although it’s for a men’s magazine, there is something for everyone in your article, which is a tribute to you as a person and a writer. The Four Agreements are very interesting, and I can see why they’ve become something you try to live your life by. I think it’s pretty admirable that instead of sulking about this turbulent time in your life, you’re sharing your experience with others. Congrats on getting published, and I can’t wait to see what’s next!

  6. Sweet new gig! I really enjoyed this post. You’re right that although it’s for a men’s magazine, there is something for everyone in your article, which is a tribute to you as a person and a writer. The Four Agreements are very interesting, and I can see why they’ve become something you try to live your life by. I think it’s pretty admirable that instead of sulking about this turbulent time in your life, you’re sharing your experience with others. Congrats on getting published, and I can’t wait to see what’s next!