CWC + RTB = RESULTS!

What’s your first response when someone asks you, “What is social media marketing?” – Do you preach the benefits of establishing relationships with your customers? The engagement and interactivity that surrounds your company brand? The ability to pinpoint and target PR to a very specific market of consumers? All are clear benefits – but connecting and engaging is only half the battle.

Using social media, or any marketing medium for that matter, should contribute to improving your overall brand image. It should give your consumers, fans, and overall audience a reason to care about you and ‘buy in’ to what you’re ‘selling’.

Focus on not only connecting with consumers (CWC) but also providing RTB (reason to buy) – If you’re willing to take the time to do both effectively, your results will more than speak for themselves.

What do you think?

Is there a magic formula for effective social media marketing? What are you doing to optimize your personal and/or professional online presence?

Join the conversation! 40 Comments

  1. Based on this? “Connecting and engaging is only half the battle.”

    I’d probably flank Cobra by distracting the Destro and going in with some artillery. Then I’d proceed to hit on the Baroness hardcore.

    Then again, that’s the other part of the knowing is half the battle thing.

    Reply
  2. Based on this? “Connecting and engaging is only half the battle.”

    I’d probably flank Cobra by distracting the Destro and going in with some artillery. Then I’d proceed to hit on the Baroness hardcore.

    Then again, that’s the other part of the knowing is half the battle thing.

    Reply
  3. As a fellow social media marketer, I think you’ve got a good formula here. I was a little wary at first, because “reason to buy” is a little limiting, but in the video you expand on that concept and include “reason to return.” I work for an online ad network, so our social media efforts are not to sell a product per say, but more to show people what we’re all about and encourage them to work with us. My goal, in building our social media identity, is to show not just what we are, but who we are as a company and as people. By connecting with people and showing them the more human side, hopefully they’ll want to do business with us in the future. Great thoughts, and love the video post!

    Reply
    • I use the term “buy” very loosely – that’s what the ” ” are for. The word buy can mean a million different things depending on your platform. Give your people a reason to buy, a reason to read, a reason to connect, a reason to keep coming back – It has to be more than just connecting, you need to provide your audience with a tangible takeaway and a reason to do ‘business’ with you in the future.

      Reply
      • Right, I know you used the word loosely, and that’s why I agree. And you’re right, the audience has to gain something from visiting your site or blog. Otherwise, why else are you doing it?

        Reply
  4. As a fellow social media marketer, I think you’ve got a good formula here. I was a little wary at first, because “reason to buy” is a little limiting, but in the video you expand on that concept and include “reason to return.” I work for an online ad network, so our social media efforts are not to sell a product per say, but more to show people what we’re all about and encourage them to work with us. My goal, in building our social media identity, is to show not just what we are, but who we are as a company and as people. By connecting with people and showing them the more human side, hopefully they’ll want to do business with us in the future. Great thoughts, and love the video post!

    Reply
    • I use the term “buy” very loosely – that’s what the ” ” are for. The word buy can mean a million different things depending on your platform. Give your people a reason to buy, a reason to read, a reason to connect, a reason to keep coming back – It has to be more than just connecting, you need to provide your audience with a tangible takeaway and a reason to do ‘business’ with you in the future.

      Reply
      • Right, I know you used the word loosely, and that’s why I agree. And you’re right, the audience has to gain something from visiting your site or blog. Otherwise, why else are you doing it?

        Reply
  5. Hey Matt great post, I think that a lot of people get one of these halves down pat but forget about the other half. I’d also add that I’d argue that if you only got half of the equation right, then you’d probably get less than half of the results because there are definitely synergies to getting both CWC and RTB right. As to how that is expressed in equation form – Not quite sure :)

    Reply
    • Thanks Jackie. My illustration here is that one component relies on the other – and you have to have both to see REAL results. In order to effectively give your “consumers” a reason to buy, you need to take the time to connect with them, build a rapport, and establish a relationship. On the same token, connecting isn’t enough – it doesn’t stop there – you can talk to people all day long but if you aren’t giving them a reason to take action, what’s the use in communicating in the first place? Relationships and results are the ying and the yang of the business world.

      Reply
  6. Hey Matt great post, I think that a lot of people get one of these halves down pat but forget about the other half. I’d also add that I’d argue that if you only got half of the equation right, then you’d probably get less than half of the results because there are definitely synergies to getting both CWC and RTB right. As to how that is expressed in equation form – Not quite sure :)

    Reply
    • Thanks Jackie. My illustration here is that one component relies on the other – and you have to have both to see REAL results. In order to effectively give your “consumers” a reason to buy, you need to take the time to connect with them, build a rapport, and establish a relationship. On the same token, connecting isn’t enough – it doesn’t stop there – you can talk to people all day long but if you aren’t giving them a reason to take action, what’s the use in communicating in the first place? Relationships and results are the ying and the yang of the business world.

      Reply
  7. I don´t like to think there`s a perfect magic formula for anything, because every rule has its exception. Just like when cooking, there`s a recipe but that doesn`t mean following it is the only way to cook someting delicious. This one, though, looks pretty good, and I`m sure it provides some good results. Connecting and giving a reason? When you engage you make people care about you, give them a reason and you`ve got a customer.
    Loved this post :)

    Reply
    • Agreed – there really is no ‘magic formula’ – I made a pretty bold statement here on purpose. As the old expression goes, there is more than one way to skin a cat. You hit the nail on the head, these two ideas go hand in hand, and one will never be successful without the other.

      Reply
  8. I don´t like to think there`s a perfect magic formula for anything, because every rule has its exception. Just like when cooking, there`s a recipe but that doesn`t mean following it is the only way to cook someting delicious. This one, though, looks pretty good, and I`m sure it provides some good results. Connecting and giving a reason? When you engage you make people care about you, give them a reason and you`ve got a customer.
    Loved this post :)

    Reply
    • Agreed – there really is no ‘magic formula’ – I made a pretty bold statement here on purpose. As the old expression goes, there is more than one way to skin a cat. You hit the nail on the head, these two ideas go hand in hand, and one will never be successful without the other.

      Reply
  9. Nice work. I like the formula. It’s simple, but there’s so many layers to it. I break it down a bit for nonprofits here. And, I also give your formula a name.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the write-up Sam – I can’t take for coming up with the formula, but in the blogging world, we’re all about adding our personal touch to what’s already out there, right? – In that spirit, I’ll gladly dub this the ‘Chevy Formula’ – For those who may be browsing through the comments, head over and read Sam’s analysis, good stuff.

      Reply
  10. Nice work. I like the formula. It’s simple, but there’s so many layers to it. I break it down a bit for nonprofits here. And, I also give your formula a name.

    Reply
    • Thanks for the write-up Sam – I can’t take for coming up with the formula, but in the blogging world, we’re all about adding our personal touch to what’s already out there, right? – In that spirit, I’ll gladly dub this the ‘Chevy Formula’ – For those who may be browsing through the comments, head over and read Sam’s analysis, good stuff.

      Reply
  11. Like Sam I was a bit hesitant and felt boxed in with “RTB” prior to hearing you expand on that notion in the video. As I watched this I thought about two other things components as they relate to RTB (I’m assuming that CWC is a given and everyone can see and/or should see the value there.)

    1.) Is GREAT content enough for RTB? It’s probably not for people like us (not yet anyway), but it might be for Brian Clark, Leo Babauta, etc. — And even then they need a call-to-action.

    2.) What about this call-to-action? I think this is where *timing* becomes a critical factor. I think, depending on your model, you have to have great timing for your RTB.

    Reply
    • Ryan – you raise some interesting points:

      1) Is GREAT content enough for RTB? No, but it goes a long way – It’s extremely difficult to connect if your content isn’t “sell-able”.

      2) RE timing: I’m glad you brought up the topic of timeliness. It’s vastly underrated and can make all the difference in the world. Just see the ‘GREATEST’ tab over on the right and the top post is my 150 comment monster follow-up to a controversial Penelope Trunk post – written on the same day, a couple hours after hers went up. I fed of the residual traffic from that for a couple months, and still retain many subscribers from that ‘event’. It’s a clear example that you have to be on your toes and by doing so, are able to connect with consumers on a topic that is fresh on their mind(s). We see examples of this all the time – bloggers fighting to publish ‘breaking news’ first.

      Reply
  12. Like Sam I was a bit hesitant and felt boxed in with “RTB” prior to hearing you expand on that notion in the video. As I watched this I thought about two other things components as they relate to RTB (I’m assuming that CWC is a given and everyone can see and/or should see the value there.)

    1.) Is GREAT content enough for RTB? It’s probably not for people like us (not yet anyway), but it might be for Brian Clark, Leo Babauta, etc. — And even then they need a call-to-action.

    2.) What about this call-to-action? I think this is where *timing* becomes a critical factor. I think, depending on your model, you have to have great timing for your RTB.

    Reply
    • Ryan – you raise some interesting points:

      1) Is GREAT content enough for RTB? No, but it goes a long way – It’s extremely difficult to connect if your content isn’t “sell-able”.

      2) RE timing: I’m glad you brought up the topic of timeliness. It’s vastly underrated and can make all the difference in the world. Just see the ‘GREATEST’ tab over on the right and the top post is my 150 comment monster follow-up to a controversial Penelope Trunk post – written on the same day, a couple hours after hers went up. I fed of the residual traffic from that for a couple months, and still retain many subscribers from that ‘event’. It’s a clear example that you have to be on your toes and by doing so, are able to connect with consumers on a topic that is fresh on their mind(s). We see examples of this all the time – bloggers fighting to publish ‘breaking news’ first.

      Reply
  13. You heard me say it a thousand times my friend: It’s all about respect. Respect for people’s time. That’s my formula.
    I do think thought that many people have an effective social media marketing without the connecting part. Many successful bloggers don’t comment or even reply. Their reason for us to buy is enough for many people.
    But that may not be the case for us “normies”, of course.

    Reply
    • I agree that this formula can and does evolve over time. But where do you think those ‘high profile’ successful bloggers started? Once upon a time they were ‘normies’ too – everyone starts somewhere. Do you stop focusing on the connections and start focusing on results as you gain popularity – sure – I think that is part of the natural transformation – but there’s a problem when you forget about it altogether.

      Reply
  14. You heard me say it a thousand times my friend: It’s all about respect. Respect for people’s time. That’s my formula.
    I do think thought that many people have an effective social media marketing without the connecting part. Many successful bloggers don’t comment or even reply. Their reason for us to buy is enough for many people.
    But that may not be the case for us “normies”, of course.

    Reply
    • I agree that this formula can and does evolve over time. But where do you think those ‘high profile’ successful bloggers started? Once upon a time they were ‘normies’ too – everyone starts somewhere. Do you stop focusing on the connections and start focusing on results as you gain popularity – sure – I think that is part of the natural transformation – but there’s a problem when you forget about it altogether.

      Reply
  15. Thanks for the information… I feel social media is important because it improves a company’s relationships with their customers, increases sales, increases media coverage, reduces customer service costs, improves relationships with customers, and improves the recruiting process.

    Reply
  16. Thanks for the information… I feel social media is important because it improves a company’s relationships with their customers, increases sales, increases media coverage, reduces customer service costs, improves relationships with customers, and improves the recruiting process.

    Reply
  17. Before the video, never thought about it in terms of RTB. Great point.

    Side Note: I was hosting a GoToMeeting (sharing my screen) last week and as I toggled between tabs, I landed on my email. I had 3 comment-update messages from “Life Without Pants!” I had to promise my audience that you weren’t a porn site! It was very funny.

    Reply
    • HAHA – Nice! You aren’t the first to share a story like this. I feel like I need a disclaimer in the header that says ‘Not Porn, I Swear!’ – You should see the search queries I get – needless to say I think MANY people are disappointed when they arrive here looking for something much, much different.

      Reply
  18. Before the video, never thought about it in terms of RTB. Great point.

    Side Note: I was hosting a GoToMeeting (sharing my screen) last week and as I toggled between tabs, I landed on my email. I had 3 comment-update messages from “Life Without Pants!” I had to promise my audience that you weren’t a porn site! It was very funny.

    Reply
    • HAHA – Nice! You aren’t the first to share a story like this. I feel like I need a disclaimer in the header that says ‘Not Porn, I Swear!’ – You should see the search queries I get – needless to say I think MANY people are disappointed when they arrive here looking for something much, much different.

      Reply
  19. This formula is what I think captures all that I have to say. You nail it right on. Connecting with consumer,give reason to buy.

    Reply
  20. This formula is what I think captures all that I have to say. You nail it right on. Connecting with consumer,give reason to buy.

    Reply
  21. Thanks for sharing the cool ideas.
    Social media is not good until you are not social.

    Reply
  22. Thanks for sharing the cool ideas.
    Social media is not good until you are not social.

    Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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