The Inconvenience of Change: Learning = Change [Ruby Ku]

The Inconvenience of Change: Learning = Change

Matt asked us to write about why change is so inconvenient and why people are resistant to change. To be honest, I don’t know. I have far more questions than answers when it comes to topics such as social change, leadership, and responsibility for our Earth and its people.

Although I don’t have definite answers, I do have something to share from my experience volunteering at a community center.  Over the past few months, I had the chance to assist with teaching a Computer Basics class and met people from all walks of life. When I say basic, I mean basic. The first class was spent explaining to them the names of different computer parts (ie. monitor, keyboard, hard-drive) and how to move a mouse.

Being with them through this learning experience was quite emotional for me. I saw them feeling completely clueless about something that is so intuitive for me. I saw them struggle asking lots of “stupid questions” and feeling stupid for asking them. I saw them not remembering anything that I just said and sheepishly requesting that I repeat.

We grow up so fast

From this experience, I concluded that: learning is frustrating. Learning something from the very basics for an adult is very intimidating. It takes a lot of hard work, commitment, courage, and patience. Perhaps that is why change is so inconvenient.

When we were kids, we were not afraid making mistakes, we were used to learning new ideas everyday, we would not be embarrassed if we didn’t know something. But as we grow up, all of that seem to have changed. For some reason, we expect ourselves to know all the answers in the world. We feel bad if we don’t know the answer, worse yet, we apologize for asking questions.

My friend, Renjie, volunteers at an elementary school on weeknights. He said to me, “It’s amazing what kids can teach you sometimes. Perhaps the reason why people are reluctant to change is because as we have ‘grown’ up, somewhere along the way, we’ve lost our sense of risk, wonder and play. We box ourselves into the definitions placed on us by society. Perhaps we just need to think of ourselves in a different way.”

You have to WANT to learn

Changing old behaviors require one to learn something new. Learning something new is a very frustrating and intimidating experience. So people can/will only change if they wholeheartedly want to, not when they’re being told to. I genuinely believe that people do care and they do want a better world. So I guess our job as a change-agent is to encourage people to see that there is a better way and empower them to make better choices for themselves.

It really feels like I’m just stating the obvious. But maybe we all just need to be more okay with making mistakes at times and stop expecting ourselves to know all the answers. Will that make you more willing to just try, and have more fun with life?

AUTHOR BIO: Ruby is a 23-year-old that blogs at I care. She’s inspired by caring individuals and loves it when people email her and tell her they care. She loves exploring, learning, and eating. In everything she does, she sees every single day as an opportunity to make the world a little better than it was yesterday and life a little easier for people that she loves. I met Ruby through a mutual friend in the blogosphere, and am an avid reader of her blog. A driven and compassionate writer,  Ruby is committed to inspiring social change in the world. Let’s just say, if we all thought a little more like Ruby Ku, the world would probably be a much better place.


46 Responses
  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    A couple of days ago, a friend of mine told me something that took a lot of weight of my back:

    “Life is a videogame”

    When you consider life as a game, and as something fun, your whole perspective towards new experiences and learning changes.

    Learning is hard because we’ve related it with effort and pain instead of growth and fun. You’re dead on with this post Ruby.

    Loved it. Don’t have too much to add, you got ir just right.

    • Ruby Reply

      Oh my god! Can you introduce your friend to me? Because I started thinking of life as a video game since I was about 15 years old – maybe I heard it from someone, somewhere, I don’t know! But it has been one of the most important things I’ve learned growing up and it’s definitely served me well and kept things in perspective for me over the years. Super Mario is my favorite :D Maybe that’s why I am not too afraid to falling/failing..it’s a lot of fun :)

      • Matt Reply

        Carlos and Ruby – check out this post by Jun Loayza – ‘Personal Branding is a Real Life Role Playing Game’http://personalbrandingblog.com/personal-branding-is-a-real-life-role-playing-game/

        In one way, life is like a role-playing game – through your actions you learn and gain skills that make you a more well rounded and powerful individual. On the other hand, life is like a game like Mario – in the game, we’re not afraid to jump over pits of fire and travel through the next dark castle. We aren’t afraid to take risks and dive into the unknown – if we could channel this mantra into our daily lives, change wouldn’t be such a daunting task. LOVE the analogy.

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    A couple of days ago, a friend of mine told me something that took a lot of weight of my back:

    “Life is a videogame”

    When you consider life as a game, and as something fun, your whole perspective towards new experiences and learning changes.

    Learning is hard because we’ve related it with effort and pain instead of growth and fun. You’re dead on with this post Ruby.

    Loved it. Don’t have too much to add, you got ir just right.

    • Ruby Reply

      Oh my god! Can you introduce your friend to me? Because I started thinking of life as a video game since I was about 15 years old – maybe I heard it from someone, somewhere, I don’t know! But it has been one of the most important things I’ve learned growing up and it’s definitely served me well and kept things in perspective for me over the years. Super Mario is my favorite :D Maybe that’s why I am not too afraid to falling/failing..it’s a lot of fun :)

      • Matt Reply

        Carlos and Ruby – check out this post by Jun Loayza – ‘Personal Branding is a Real Life Role Playing Game’http://personalbrandingblog.com/personal-branding-is-a-real-life-role-playing-game/

        In one way, life is like a role-playing game – through your actions you learn and gain skills that make you a more well rounded and powerful individual. On the other hand, life is like a game like Mario – in the game, we’re not afraid to jump over pits of fire and travel through the next dark castle. We aren’t afraid to take risks and dive into the unknown – if we could channel this mantra into our daily lives, change wouldn’t be such a daunting task. LOVE the analogy.

  • Sam Reply

    Ruby, this is a great post! You make an important point that people can only truly change if they want to. Otherwise, they won’t be willing to put in the time and effort that change requires. At times though, I think some people just assume that change isn’t worth it instead of dealing with the short term challenges in order to make things better in the long run.

    • Ruby Reply

      You’re right Sam. I know where you’re coming from. But sometimes these habits are so hard to change, even if they’re to make things better in the long run. Think people who say they want to go on a diet. It’s hard enough when peope WANT to, what to do when they don’t :S

      • Matt Reply

        I agree that changes, big or small, are difficult. Change is NEVER easy – heck, I tell myself I won’t go buy a coffee in the morning on my way to work, but yet I do, time and time again. Granted, this might be categorized as an addiction, LOL. But it illustrates the point that even though I should change that habit, and it would be easy to jut not go, it’s not easy – breaking a habit, regardless of what it is, is never easy. But you have to start somewhere – many of us get caught up in the big picture and say ‘what could I possibly do to change global warming/world hunger/etc.”

        The answer is – by yourself, nothing, on a global scale, but a lot personally and within your community. Putting things into perspective is the first (and sometimes most difficult) step to making a change.

  • Sam Reply

    Ruby, this is a great post! You make an important point that people can only truly change if they want to. Otherwise, they won’t be willing to put in the time and effort that change requires. At times though, I think some people just assume that change isn’t worth it instead of dealing with the short term challenges in order to make things better in the long run.

    • Ruby Reply

      You’re right Sam. I know where you’re coming from. But sometimes these habits are so hard to change, even if they’re to make things better in the long run. Think people who say they want to go on a diet. It’s hard enough when peope WANT to, what to do when they don’t :S

      • Matt Reply

        I agree that changes, big or small, are difficult. Change is NEVER easy – heck, I tell myself I won’t go buy a coffee in the morning on my way to work, but yet I do, time and time again. Granted, this might be categorized as an addiction, LOL. But it illustrates the point that even though I should change that habit, and it would be easy to jut not go, it’s not easy – breaking a habit, regardless of what it is, is never easy. But you have to start somewhere – many of us get caught up in the big picture and say ‘what could I possibly do to change global warming/world hunger/etc.”

        The answer is – by yourself, nothing, on a global scale, but a lot personally and within your community. Putting things into perspective is the first (and sometimes most difficult) step to making a change.

  • rikin Reply

    I think many people get hung up on trying to learn about things that they think will help them advance in their career or get rich instead of becoming more ‘worldly’. When I applied for colleges I knew I wanted to study business so I choose Marketing as my major. I had to choose a minor and decided to pick Sociology (I’m only two classes away from having a Sociology double major but that’s another story).

    As I progressed in college I started to realize that Sociology was helping me more in my everyday life than my business classes were. Reading the greats like Kant, Comte, and Durkheim opened up my mind to theories and observations that simply weren’t there before. Now in any situation I tend to never take anything for face-value – this helps tremendously in business too. Sociology also has practical implications. It has made me a much better writer where as before I was the absolute pits. Studying how the greats layout their thoughts and make arguments makes it almost impossible not to improve your own writing slightly.

    Learning is definitely essential and I think people need to step outside their comfort zones and stop thinking of education in terms of ROI. You’ll only know the benefit of it after you can look back and connect the dots.

    • Ruby Reply

      Completely agree. Same thing with international experiences – people go on exchange thinking that it’ll look good on their resumes or help them get a better job. Sometimes we can’t help it..the boxes society puts us in..sigh

      I never understood why we had to choose one discipline or one major at universities. It makes no sense – nothing in this world ever functions in its own silo. I graduated from a cross-discipline program (Science and Business), but I wish I could add political science, philosophy, and design to my degree!

      Great advice Rikin. People really just need to go out, experiment what the world has to offer, and just have fun. Yeah?

    • Matt Reply

      @Rikin – Once again, you and I have something in common. I actually have a post that has been in ‘draft’ stage for a couple months centered around ‘How Sociology and Philosophy taught me more about my career than my business courses’. If I could do it all over again – I would be a philosophy major – but following down that path is somewhat limiting to career choices. I had one class, Modern philosophy where we studied the philosophy of The Matrix and American Beauty – I know you might be thinking ‘that sounds cool I guess’ – but it was much more than watching two (awesome) movies. It opened my mind to a whole new way of thinking – a whole new way of looking at what (appears) to be simple on the surface.

      I remember the last day of that class I walked up to my professor, a young guy, a recent grad from the Divinity school of Vanderbilt. I shook his hand and said ‘thank you’. I wish I had took him up on his offer to have coffee once the course was over – He REALLY taught me, he taught me how to be a better person, which is something we can rarely say about your instructors.

      Anyway – I’m not sure what brought that rant on, but there you have it – I guess, bringing it all back together, it was a prime example of someone else having a dramatic impact on my own life, inspiring to do more and ‘be better’.

  • rikin Reply

    I think many people get hung up on trying to learn about things that they think will help them advance in their career or get rich instead of becoming more ‘worldly’. When I applied for colleges I knew I wanted to study business so I choose Marketing as my major. I had to choose a minor and decided to pick Sociology (I’m only two classes away from having a Sociology double major but that’s another story).

    As I progressed in college I started to realize that Sociology was helping me more in my everyday life than my business classes were. Reading the greats like Kant, Comte, and Durkheim opened up my mind to theories and observations that simply weren’t there before. Now in any situation I tend to never take anything for face-value – this helps tremendously in business too. Sociology also has practical implications. It has made me a much better writer where as before I was the absolute pits. Studying how the greats layout their thoughts and make arguments makes it almost impossible not to improve your own writing slightly.

    Learning is definitely essential and I think people need to step outside their comfort zones and stop thinking of education in terms of ROI. You’ll only know the benefit of it after you can look back and connect the dots.

    • Ruby Reply

      Completely agree. Same thing with international experiences – people go on exchange thinking that it’ll look good on their resumes or help them get a better job. Sometimes we can’t help it..the boxes society puts us in..sigh

      I never understood why we had to choose one discipline or one major at universities. It makes no sense – nothing in this world ever functions in its own silo. I graduated from a cross-discipline program (Science and Business), but I wish I could add political science, philosophy, and design to my degree!

      Great advice Rikin. People really just need to go out, experiment what the world has to offer, and just have fun. Yeah?

    • Matt Reply

      @Rikin – Once again, you and I have something in common. I actually have a post that has been in ‘draft’ stage for a couple months centered around ‘How Sociology and Philosophy taught me more about my career than my business courses’. If I could do it all over again – I would be a philosophy major – but following down that path is somewhat limiting to career choices. I had one class, Modern philosophy where we studied the philosophy of The Matrix and American Beauty – I know you might be thinking ‘that sounds cool I guess’ – but it was much more than watching two (awesome) movies. It opened my mind to a whole new way of thinking – a whole new way of looking at what (appears) to be simple on the surface.

      I remember the last day of that class I walked up to my professor, a young guy, a recent grad from the Divinity school of Vanderbilt. I shook his hand and said ‘thank you’. I wish I had took him up on his offer to have coffee once the course was over – He REALLY taught me, he taught me how to be a better person, which is something we can rarely say about your instructors.

      Anyway – I’m not sure what brought that rant on, but there you have it – I guess, bringing it all back together, it was a prime example of someone else having a dramatic impact on my own life, inspiring to do more and ‘be better’.

  • Grace Reply

    Ruby, you nailed it on the head: “You have to WANT to learn.” That’s really the bottom line. We can also replace “learn” with “change” “quit smoking” “move forward,” etc.

    I also really liked that you brought up how things change when we’re older, compared to when we were young. I don’t know if jaded is the right word, but sometimes I feel that way. We are shaped and fashioned by our experiences and that makes it hard, for change.

    Beautifully written, Ruby. Matt, these are going to be great!

    • Ruby Reply

      The “You have to WANT to learn.” subtitle was actually added by Matt, so was the “We grow up so fast.” Just want to make sure I don’t steal credit for such great lines.

      This is sort of related to the last post that you wrote – about how we hesitate to say “I don’t know”. It’s weird, kids never have a problem to just shrug and say those 3 words. What’s with growing up? Feels like we have to relearn how to be curious about the world all over again.

      • Matt Reply

        As we continue to grow up – we almost have to make an effort to have that ‘return to innocence’. I think Grace makes a good point in that, we become jaded to an extent, life’s experiences have an impact on the way we think and our willingness to accept others. We lose trust and faith (and gain both) based on things that have happened to us.

        In addition – we assume more responsibility. When we’re a kid, the only thing we’re worried about is what moms’ going to pack us for lunch and what friends we’re going to sit with at lunch – changing a habit is much easier when the potential consequences are limited. But as adults, before we change something, we think about the repercussions of it – we can’t quit our job because we need the money, etc.

        We’ll never have that childlike innocence, that’s part of the beauty of being a kid – but getting back a little of that will help you take some risks, break away from the routine, and step outside the box more often.

        • Grace Reply

          It IS beautiful to be a child. In fact, one of my close family friends’ daughter is having her 7th birthday party this weekend and I am relishing in the fact that I get to hang out with kids all day on Saturday.

          There’s a sense of freedom and innocence that exudes from them and I think that should never be taken away. Although we become jaded over time as you say Matt, the responsibility grows and the creeping feeling of change becomes scary sometimes. I think that accepting and knowing that is half the battle. Saying, “It’s okay” can go a long way.

          • Matt Reply

            I agree Grace – we will never have that childlike innocence back – it’s just a part of growing up. But being PREPARED for change, seeking and accepting, is what it’s all about. The intent has to be there (read Eva’s post for more on this) but you have to be prepared for change before you can actively seek it. Being able to say ‘that’s OK’ is important but taking it to the next step and making things better than ‘OK’ (at least what we can control) is what we should all strive for.

  • Grace Reply

    Ruby, you nailed it on the head: “You have to WANT to learn.” That’s really the bottom line. We can also replace “learn” with “change” “quit smoking” “move forward,” etc.

    I also really liked that you brought up how things change when we’re older, compared to when we were young. I don’t know if jaded is the right word, but sometimes I feel that way. We are shaped and fashioned by our experiences and that makes it hard, for change.

    Beautifully written, Ruby. Matt, these are going to be great!

    • Ruby Reply

      The “You have to WANT to learn.” subtitle was actually added by Matt, so was the “We grow up so fast.” Just want to make sure I don’t steal credit for such great lines.

      This is sort of related to the last post that you wrote – about how we hesitate to say “I don’t know”. It’s weird, kids never have a problem to just shrug and say those 3 words. What’s with growing up? Feels like we have to relearn how to be curious about the world all over again.

      • Matt Reply

        As we continue to grow up – we almost have to make an effort to have that ‘return to innocence’. I think Grace makes a good point in that, we become jaded to an extent, life’s experiences have an impact on the way we think and our willingness to accept others. We lose trust and faith (and gain both) based on things that have happened to us.

        In addition – we assume more responsibility. When we’re a kid, the only thing we’re worried about is what moms’ going to pack us for lunch and what friends we’re going to sit with at lunch – changing a habit is much easier when the potential consequences are limited. But as adults, before we change something, we think about the repercussions of it – we can’t quit our job because we need the money, etc.

        We’ll never have that childlike innocence, that’s part of the beauty of being a kid – but getting back a little of that will help you take some risks, break away from the routine, and step outside the box more often.

        • Grace Reply

          It IS beautiful to be a child. In fact, one of my close family friends’ daughter is having her 7th birthday party this weekend and I am relishing in the fact that I get to hang out with kids all day on Saturday.

          There’s a sense of freedom and innocence that exudes from them and I think that should never be taken away. Although we become jaded over time as you say Matt, the responsibility grows and the creeping feeling of change becomes scary sometimes. I think that accepting and knowing that is half the battle. Saying, “It’s okay” can go a long way.

          • Matt Reply

            I agree Grace – we will never have that childlike innocence back – it’s just a part of growing up. But being PREPARED for change, seeking and accepting, is what it’s all about. The intent has to be there (read Eva’s post for more on this) but you have to be prepared for change before you can actively seek it. Being able to say ‘that’s OK’ is important but taking it to the next step and making things better than ‘OK’ (at least what we can control) is what we should all strive for.

  • Renjie Reply

    You are awesome Ruby! I would certainly agree that if everyone thought the same way as you did, the world would be a much better place indeed.

    • Ruby Reply

      You’re awesome too. Thanks so much for that story. I love it. I can’t wait to start tutoring when I come back in the Fall. These kids probably have a thing or two to teach me about learning how to learn.

    • Matt Reply

      I’ll just jump in here and say that you are both awesome. Renjie, I’m glad you stumbled across Life Without Pants, and your contribution to the overall ‘mission’ on your own blog is awesome! Thanks for reaching out!

  • Renjie Reply

    You are awesome Ruby! I would certainly agree that if everyone thought the same way as you did, the world would be a much better place indeed.

    • Ruby Reply

      You’re awesome too. Thanks so much for that story. I love it. I can’t wait to start tutoring when I come back in the Fall. These kids probably have a thing or two to teach me about learning how to learn.

    • Matt Reply

      I’ll just jump in here and say that you are both awesome. Renjie, I’m glad you stumbled across Life Without Pants, and your contribution to the overall ‘mission’ on your own blog is awesome! Thanks for reaching out!

  • Akhila Reply

    Great post, Ruby! You are such a great writer and always have an important, fresh perspective. I do agree that it’s difficult to change someone unless they themselves want to learn and make that change. They have to be receptive to new ideas and be willing to learn for this to work.

    The thing is, we have to help people understand why it’s so important to change — why should they even make the effort? What is it worth to them? That’s something I wonder, because I think if people realizes how important change is not only for the world but for themselves, they will really want to focus on it more. I feel like people don’t really get that feeling sometimes and so think they are fine as they are. Then, if they don’t have that desire to make a change, it’s really not going to happen no matter how much you or I want to push it into their head.

    • Ruby Reply

      I know what you mean. This is why I had such a hard time writing this post. I came very close to emailing Matt and just say, “I don’t know why people don’t want to change. I have no clue. Sorry.”

      I was talking to my professor about this. She offered some great advice. She said to me, “Ruby, you can’t fix people. People don’t want to be fixed. But at the same time that doesn’t mean they’re all ignorant and will NEVER change. You need to talk to them, real dialogues, understand their true reasons for resisting, and realize that both of you are actually working towards the same vision. Once you’ve established that common ground, you’re working together, not against each other.”

      I loved what she said and that calmed me down. I’m sure it’ll come in handy when we are on our placements this summer.

    • Matt Reply

      @Akhila – The intent has to be there, and with that, foreseeing favorable results is equally important. People need to understand the ‘WIFM’ (what’s in it for me) of change – whatever it may be, we’ll never be passionate about something we don’t understand, or don’t believe in, or don’t think we can have a REAL impact on.

      Education is half the battle – what we’re doing here, raising personal awareness with everyone who takes the time to read through this, engaging in dialogue and conversation, challenging one another – all of this is SO important in helping people look within themselves and develop their own INTENT to change. We are already witnessing people pouring out their emotions here and around the web, I’ve been amazed with the overwhelming response thus far.

      @Ruby – Confession: Part of the reason I reached out to you all is because I didn’t have the answer. I don’t know why people won’t change – but I figured, and turned out to be accurate, that collectively, we could come up with some pretty good ideas. I’m glad I didn’t get an ‘I don’t know’ email back from you. Thanks so much for challenging yourself to think about change critically.

  • Akhila Reply

    Great post, Ruby! You are such a great writer and always have an important, fresh perspective. I do agree that it’s difficult to change someone unless they themselves want to learn and make that change. They have to be receptive to new ideas and be willing to learn for this to work.

    The thing is, we have to help people understand why it’s so important to change — why should they even make the effort? What is it worth to them? That’s something I wonder, because I think if people realizes how important change is not only for the world but for themselves, they will really want to focus on it more. I feel like people don’t really get that feeling sometimes and so think they are fine as they are. Then, if they don’t have that desire to make a change, it’s really not going to happen no matter how much you or I want to push it into their head.

    • Ruby Reply

      I know what you mean. This is why I had such a hard time writing this post. I came very close to emailing Matt and just say, “I don’t know why people don’t want to change. I have no clue. Sorry.”

      I was talking to my professor about this. She offered some great advice. She said to me, “Ruby, you can’t fix people. People don’t want to be fixed. But at the same time that doesn’t mean they’re all ignorant and will NEVER change. You need to talk to them, real dialogues, understand their true reasons for resisting, and realize that both of you are actually working towards the same vision. Once you’ve established that common ground, you’re working together, not against each other.”

      I loved what she said and that calmed me down. I’m sure it’ll come in handy when we are on our placements this summer.

    • Matt Reply

      @Akhila – The intent has to be there, and with that, foreseeing favorable results is equally important. People need to understand the ‘WIFM’ (what’s in it for me) of change – whatever it may be, we’ll never be passionate about something we don’t understand, or don’t believe in, or don’t think we can have a REAL impact on.

      Education is half the battle – what we’re doing here, raising personal awareness with everyone who takes the time to read through this, engaging in dialogue and conversation, challenging one another – all of this is SO important in helping people look within themselves and develop their own INTENT to change. We are already witnessing people pouring out their emotions here and around the web, I’ve been amazed with the overwhelming response thus far.

      @Ruby – Confession: Part of the reason I reached out to you all is because I didn’t have the answer. I don’t know why people won’t change – but I figured, and turned out to be accurate, that collectively, we could come up with some pretty good ideas. I’m glad I didn’t get an ‘I don’t know’ email back from you. Thanks so much for challenging yourself to think about change critically.

  • Shereen Reply

    Really enjoyed reading the post Ruby! Such a fresh angle.

    I agree, we need to “want” to change and understand what we’re saying “yes” to when we do and what we’re also saying “no” to when he choose not to.

    @Rikin, I fully agree, we so often get caught up with the hype of the mainstream – of what we “should” be doing to advance, or get wealthy, and “fit in” that we don’t really absorb what it is we’re learning in the first place and if it will help us grow as individuals and a society as a whole.

    A quote I love sums it up: “Change is inevitable, growth is intentional” – Glenda Cloud.

    Looking forward to the rest of the posts, such an igniting topic!! Thanks Matt for pulling this together.

    • Ruby Reply

      Ohhhh good point. Saying “yes” or “no” to something we don’t really know about is hard. I guess that’s why most of the people don’t take action. So many options, so many opinions, who is right? who to listen to? who to trust? who to vote for? And when I don’t know something, the safest way to act is to not act.

    • Matt Reply

      @Shereen – I’m happy to be organizing this – and thank YOU for being a part of it. I love the quote you share ‘Change is inevitable, growth is intentional’ – This is SO true – change is the only constant we have, it will happen, so there are two things to keep in mind:

      One: How do I embrace it? When change comes through, when life deals you some adversity or conflict – how will you deal with it? Will you hang your head and ‘roll with the punches’ or will you embrace it, learn from it, and grow from it?

      Two: Proactive about change. Far too often we sit here waiting on the world to change around us. Millions of people are looking toward the Obama administration to ‘make everything better’ – this will NEVER happen. If we want change, we have to start with ‘me’ before we think about ‘we’.

      Stop waiting, start doing. And when life deals you an ‘oh shit’ card, take something from the experience, GROW from it!

  • Shereen Reply

    Really enjoyed reading the post Ruby! Such a fresh angle.

    I agree, we need to “want” to change and understand what we’re saying “yes” to when we do and what we’re also saying “no” to when he choose not to.

    @Rikin, I fully agree, we so often get caught up with the hype of the mainstream – of what we “should” be doing to advance, or get wealthy, and “fit in” that we don’t really absorb what it is we’re learning in the first place and if it will help us grow as individuals and a society as a whole.

    A quote I love sums it up: “Change is inevitable, growth is intentional” – Glenda Cloud.

    Looking forward to the rest of the posts, such an igniting topic!! Thanks Matt for pulling this together.

    • Ruby Reply

      Ohhhh good point. Saying “yes” or “no” to something we don’t really know about is hard. I guess that’s why most of the people don’t take action. So many options, so many opinions, who is right? who to listen to? who to trust? who to vote for? And when I don’t know something, the safest way to act is to not act.

    • Matt Reply

      @Shereen – I’m happy to be organizing this – and thank YOU for being a part of it. I love the quote you share ‘Change is inevitable, growth is intentional’ – This is SO true – change is the only constant we have, it will happen, so there are two things to keep in mind:

      One: How do I embrace it? When change comes through, when life deals you some adversity or conflict – how will you deal with it? Will you hang your head and ‘roll with the punches’ or will you embrace it, learn from it, and grow from it?

      Two: Proactive about change. Far too often we sit here waiting on the world to change around us. Millions of people are looking toward the Obama administration to ‘make everything better’ – this will NEVER happen. If we want change, we have to start with ‘me’ before we think about ‘we’.

      Stop waiting, start doing. And when life deals you an ‘oh shit’ card, take something from the experience, GROW from it!

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