Sometimes the Best Plan is Not Having a Plan

It’s time for a new plan

I’ve always been one to have a plan. Always knowing what’s next, living without surprises, and having it all mapped out. Call it dull or lame, but it’s this non-spontaneous lifestyle that has gotten me to where I am today. I’ve taken the ‘safe’ route time and time again, settling for what seemed like the rational thing to do, even if it mean turning something down I was passionate about. Some of this can be attributed to how I was brought up, but a lot of it is based in fear. Fear of failure, fear of disappointing myself and those who have put their faith in me, and fear of the unknown.

Sorry Mario. You're screwed!

Finally, after 23 years, I’m throwing caution to the wind and I’m facing my fears, breaking away from the routine, and doing the craziest (and probably best) thing I’ve done in my life so far.

Those of you who are close to me – or at least have spoken to me outside of ‘the Pants’ – know that the past several months have been a whirlwind for yours truly. Online, I (we) have managed to create an amazing community here on the blog, 50 of us gathered together for the Inconvenience of Change series, and I’m working on writing my first book. Offline, in the ‘real world’, I’ve been deriving a master plan to pack my bags, leave my home town of Nashville, and start the next chapter of my life with my fiance in Chicago.

Many of us have been through moves – but living in a new place isn’t what I’m afraid of. It’s what I’m leaving behind, the memories, friends, and family.  It’s not knowing what the future has in store for me, wondering what the hell I’m going to do with my life once I get there, that scares me to death.

Taking some (leaps) of faith

Last week I put my two weeks notice in at my current employer, and here I am, one week away from packing up my things and heading north, face-to-face with unemployment and a very limited amount of savings to my name. It’s something I never wanted to or planned on doing. In fact, it’s something I’ve spoken out against in the past, calling it ‘stupid and senseless‘. After spending months networking, several trips to Chicago for interviews, and having sent a countless number of resumes and cover letters for jobs of all different shapes and sizes – I still (so far) have nothing to show for it. That recession everyone has been talking about? It’s real. Very real.

On top of that, I’m getting mixed support from my family here in town. They are the ‘voice of reason’ telling me that I should take things slow, spend more time planning, and be ‘realistic‘. Maybe they’re right – maybe it is crazy. I don’t have an argument other than ‘this is what I want to do‘. But isn’t that a hell of an argument? Isn’t life about doing what you want even if it doesn’t make the most sense? Even if it seems completely crazy and there are a millions reasons why you shouldn’t?

It’s not easy for me to leave this part of my life, the only life I’ve known for the past twenty-three years (ehem, that would be since birth for those of you trying to guess my age). It’s hard to say goodbye to it all. But I understand that in order to build toward my future, I have to break away from the past.

To say this has tested my will 100 times over would be an understatement. It’s been insanely stressful. I’ve doubted myself and my decisions over and over again. But I continue to learn more and more about who I am and what I am capable of. To quote American Beauty, “It’s an amazing thing when you realize you still have the ability to surprise yourself”. I am doing just that, surprising myself, learning what ‘living to your full potential‘ really means.

There is no happy ending (yet)

I wish I had a noble conclusion – some eloquent parting words to sum it all up. But if there is one thing all of you can take away from this, one ‘moral’ to my story, it’s have faith in yourself. Believe in yourself and what you want to do. Only YOU can say what’s best for you. We all have passions that go unrealized because we’re afraid to leave our comfort zones. We’re afraid that we might fail. And you know, you very well might. I’m stepping outside the box and making myself vulnerable. Odds are, it won’t all go according to plan – but I have faith, and that faith is supported because I know I’m giving it my all. I remain vigilant in my career search, I continue to network, I pray, and through it all, I make time for myself, my writing, building relationships and continuing to grow this community. I might fail, in fact, I already have – but failure makes you tough, it inspires you to try that much harder next time, it breeds success!

I’m happy. I’m nervous and scared as hell. But I’m happy. And in the end, that’s all that matters. When it’s all said and done; after I save the world, get the girl, and the dust settles, I want to be standing on top of Bowser’s castle knowing that I lived life on my own terms. Played by my own rules. Achieved what everyone told me I couldn’t achieve.

Life is a crazy thing, but every day I learn to appreciate it a little more. Upset the established order you’ve created. Be in the moment. Live without a plan and without restrictions. After all, isn’t that what life without pants is all about?


99 Responses
  • Rosalina Reply

    Wow! That IS scary, but I guess if you wouldn´t go for it, you´d spend the rest of your life wondering, what if I had? And that sucks. I think what you`re doing is great, doing what we really want can be stressful and scary and all that you said, but I know for sure it´s worth it and as long as you`re HAPPY, nothing else matters, so good luck! :)

    • Matt Reply

      Exactly Rosalina – I don’t want to be sitting on the sidelines forever, wondering ‘what if’? In situations like this – there may not ever be a right time. I understand that the transition isn’t going to be easy and that it’s really going to test my will and determination – but I have faith in myself and the good things life has in store for me. I hope that other people who are out there reading this, wondering ‘what if’ will see that all it takes is a leap of faith to start realizing your dreams and potential.

      Thank you for the well wishes Rosalina. If nothing else, this journey will give me a lot to write about in the coming months.

      • Rosalina Reply

        You`re very welcome! I`m sure you`re inspiring others out there. Btw, I LOVED the picture…do you know how many times that happened to me? Too many… :)

        • Matt Reply

          @Rosalina. I think it’s safe to say we’ve all been in one of those unfortunate situations while playing Mario. Thinking we can dart under there, get a few coins, only to be trapped with no way out. There’s nothing worse than being small Mario staring certain death directly in the face.

  • Rosalina Reply

    Wow! That IS scary, but I guess if you wouldn´t go for it, you´d spend the rest of your life wondering, what if I had? And that sucks. I think what you`re doing is great, doing what we really want can be stressful and scary and all that you said, but I know for sure it´s worth it and as long as you`re HAPPY, nothing else matters, so good luck! :)

    • Matt Reply

      Exactly Rosalina – I don’t want to be sitting on the sidelines forever, wondering ‘what if’? In situations like this – there may not ever be a right time. I understand that the transition isn’t going to be easy and that it’s really going to test my will and determination – but I have faith in myself and the good things life has in store for me. I hope that other people who are out there reading this, wondering ‘what if’ will see that all it takes is a leap of faith to start realizing your dreams and potential.

      Thank you for the well wishes Rosalina. If nothing else, this journey will give me a lot to write about in the coming months.

      • Rosalina Reply

        You`re very welcome! I`m sure you`re inspiring others out there. Btw, I LOVED the picture…do you know how many times that happened to me? Too many… :)

        • Matt Reply

          @Rosalina. I think it’s safe to say we’ve all been in one of those unfortunate situations while playing Mario. Thinking we can dart under there, get a few coins, only to be trapped with no way out. There’s nothing worse than being small Mario staring certain death directly in the face.

  • Elisa Reply

    Matt, congrats on taking a VERY big leap of faith to follow your dreams. I think its so important to have dreams and ideas of where you want your life to go, what you want to pursue and what (in the end) will help you to be happy.

    I have a few years on you (I’m looking at a decade birthday next year, the fateful 3-0) and I have lived my life with that same reserved and careful decision making that you speak of. Even when things didn’t go as planned I took the safe well-lit route instead of leaping into the wild unknown. I’ve managed to make a pretty great life for myself, and for most they’d be thrilled with these accomplishments (or so people keep telling me.) But I see a lot of people at the same precipice I was 5-7 years ago not taking the leap, forgetting their dreams and following the safe road and I want to reach out and shake them and tell them that life is wild and crazy and unpredictable and at the end of the day just take the leap and move to Chicago and be young and excited and ready cause in a matter of years bills and responsibilities and life will put a stronghold on you that is pretty difficult (though not impossible) to get out of.

    Whew! So long story short, kudos to you and best of luck and good thoughts and wishes as you get ready to start a new adventure!

    • Matt Reply

      @Elisa – Thank you so much for the kind words and well wishes. You have been on fire here lately at Life Without Pants, I’m learning a lot about you! I can’t tell you how great it’s been to have so much support from the online community. And it’s comforting to know that there are a lot of people who have been there, or are going through these leaps of faith themselves. My hope, by sharing this personal experience, is that other people will realize that sometimes you have to introduce a little chaos into your life to end up where you (really) want to be.

      I am in no way complaining about where my life is today. This new plan isn’t to make a radical change in my lifestyle – but whether I like it or not, I’m going to be faced with new challenges and obstacles. But with that being said, there is no doubt in my mind that everything will be great when all is said and done. Once this challenge has been overcome, I’m sure there will be a new one waiting for me, because that’s what life’s all about. Without some obstacles, life would be a pretty dull experience.

  • Elisa Reply

    Matt, congrats on taking a VERY big leap of faith to follow your dreams. I think its so important to have dreams and ideas of where you want your life to go, what you want to pursue and what (in the end) will help you to be happy.

    I have a few years on you (I’m looking at a decade birthday next year, the fateful 3-0) and I have lived my life with that same reserved and careful decision making that you speak of. Even when things didn’t go as planned I took the safe well-lit route instead of leaping into the wild unknown. I’ve managed to make a pretty great life for myself, and for most they’d be thrilled with these accomplishments (or so people keep telling me.) But I see a lot of people at the same precipice I was 5-7 years ago not taking the leap, forgetting their dreams and following the safe road and I want to reach out and shake them and tell them that life is wild and crazy and unpredictable and at the end of the day just take the leap and move to Chicago and be young and excited and ready cause in a matter of years bills and responsibilities and life will put a stronghold on you that is pretty difficult (though not impossible) to get out of.

    Whew! So long story short, kudos to you and best of luck and good thoughts and wishes as you get ready to start a new adventure!

    • Matt Reply

      @Elisa – Thank you so much for the kind words and well wishes. You have been on fire here lately at Life Without Pants, I’m learning a lot about you! I can’t tell you how great it’s been to have so much support from the online community. And it’s comforting to know that there are a lot of people who have been there, or are going through these leaps of faith themselves. My hope, by sharing this personal experience, is that other people will realize that sometimes you have to introduce a little chaos into your life to end up where you (really) want to be.

      I am in no way complaining about where my life is today. This new plan isn’t to make a radical change in my lifestyle – but whether I like it or not, I’m going to be faced with new challenges and obstacles. But with that being said, there is no doubt in my mind that everything will be great when all is said and done. Once this challenge has been overcome, I’m sure there will be a new one waiting for me, because that’s what life’s all about. Without some obstacles, life would be a pretty dull experience.

  • Stephen Reply

    Having faith in yourself is key. Good luck in Chicago. It’s one of my most fav cities.

    Love the post…

    – Stephen

    • Matt Reply

      Cheers to you Stephen. I know you’re going through some big things yourself these days, so good luck to you as well. I’m sure our paths will cross sometime sooner than later!

  • Stephen Reply

    Having faith in yourself is key. Good luck in Chicago. It’s one of my most fav cities.

    Love the post…

    – Stephen

    • Matt Reply

      Cheers to you Stephen. I know you’re going through some big things yourself these days, so good luck to you as well. I’m sure our paths will cross sometime sooner than later!

  • Sam Reply

    Matt, I consider myself lucky to be one the people who knows you “outside of ‘the Pants,’” as you put it. So, I’ve watched you go through this process from the beginning, and I know how hard it’s been for you. You may not realize how much your mindset has changed, but I do, and I just want to say that I’m proud of you for persevering and realizing that this will all be worth it in the end.

    Okay, enough compliments :) I also have some insight to share. I moved when I was 16. The major difference between me then and you now is that I wasn’t looking for a job, but otherwise it was pretty similar. I left everything I had ever known and started over in a place where I knew next to no one. I had no idea where I would fit in, or if I even would. It was totally scary and overwhelming.

    We moved because my dad wasn’t happy in his job, and I know you’re moving so your fiance can be closer to her family. I won’t lie to you and say everything worked out, because it didn’t. Things were different, but they did get better. You are stronger than you realize, and you have a lot of people who care about you. So, as scary is this may be, as much as you hate not knowing what will happen, I think it will turn out to be the best decision you ever make. If it doesn’t, you’ll certainly learn a lot about yourself in the process. Just keep an open mind and continue believing in yourself.

    I’m glad you were able to write about this. I think it’s something a lot of people can relate to, and it will be very appreciated. Good luck! I know something great will come your way.

    • Matt Reply

      @Sam – Thank you. As you said, it has been a tough road. Not because I doubted whether or not I want to move – Chicago is where I want to be – but because I’m the kind of person who can’t help but worry, can’t help but look at the big picture. I’ve played it safe my whole life, stayed close to home for college when I could have went away, and so on. I feel like this is my first real step into total independence, and that’s a scary thing, for anyone.

      Luckily, I have a lot of family in the Chicagoland area. In fact, most of them live there – that support and love makes this much, much easier. The emotions I’m feeling – worried, scared, excited, nervous – I think it’s all pretty natural. But, like I said in the post above, I’m happy. I know this is what I want in my life. That fact is what keeps my head on straight and keeps me motivated to keep moving forward no matter how much doubt and worry tries to hold me back.

      It’s going to be a wild ride. I wouldn’t have it any other way!

  • Sam Reply

    Matt, I consider myself lucky to be one the people who knows you “outside of ‘the Pants,’” as you put it. So, I’ve watched you go through this process from the beginning, and I know how hard it’s been for you. You may not realize how much your mindset has changed, but I do, and I just want to say that I’m proud of you for persevering and realizing that this will all be worth it in the end.

    Okay, enough compliments :) I also have some insight to share. I moved when I was 16. The major difference between me then and you now is that I wasn’t looking for a job, but otherwise it was pretty similar. I left everything I had ever known and started over in a place where I knew next to no one. I had no idea where I would fit in, or if I even would. It was totally scary and overwhelming.

    We moved because my dad wasn’t happy in his job, and I know you’re moving so your fiance can be closer to her family. I won’t lie to you and say everything worked out, because it didn’t. Things were different, but they did get better. You are stronger than you realize, and you have a lot of people who care about you. So, as scary is this may be, as much as you hate not knowing what will happen, I think it will turn out to be the best decision you ever make. If it doesn’t, you’ll certainly learn a lot about yourself in the process. Just keep an open mind and continue believing in yourself.

    I’m glad you were able to write about this. I think it’s something a lot of people can relate to, and it will be very appreciated. Good luck! I know something great will come your way.

    • Matt Reply

      @Sam – Thank you. As you said, it has been a tough road. Not because I doubted whether or not I want to move – Chicago is where I want to be – but because I’m the kind of person who can’t help but worry, can’t help but look at the big picture. I’ve played it safe my whole life, stayed close to home for college when I could have went away, and so on. I feel like this is my first real step into total independence, and that’s a scary thing, for anyone.

      Luckily, I have a lot of family in the Chicagoland area. In fact, most of them live there – that support and love makes this much, much easier. The emotions I’m feeling – worried, scared, excited, nervous – I think it’s all pretty natural. But, like I said in the post above, I’m happy. I know this is what I want in my life. That fact is what keeps my head on straight and keeps me motivated to keep moving forward no matter how much doubt and worry tries to hold me back.

      It’s going to be a wild ride. I wouldn’t have it any other way!

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    Considering you an online friend outside of Twitter and your blog, I know that you are facing an enormous life change, and I believe that lots of good things will come out of it. Specially growth, you’ll grow and lear like crazy by it!

    When reading your post, I couldn’t help to think of two phrases I read once, and that have really changed the way I see life.

    “There are no mistakes”.
    “Life is a videogame”.

    When you think about it, there’s no safety or risk, no right or wrong, it’s just choices. It’s all just a big game that you get to live the way you want. The beauty behind this point of view, is that once you assimilate it, it’s liberating. You learn the importance behind trusting yourself, like you well put it. You learn to enjoy, isntead of fear.

    This is the best attitude possible towards life. I don’t believe in long term plans. I believe in living your life to the fullest (with responsibility), and sometimes plans get in the way of that. Not knowing means growing. It’s a wonderful thing!

    Great post my man, you are great at relating your personal experience with value for the reader. I’m not even going to tell you to keep it up anymore…

    • Matt Reply

      @Carlos. Your support and encouragement over the past few months has been awesome. You don’t have to tell me to keep it up, I’m doing everything I can to keep it up every single day. I’m happy to share my personal experiences because I KNOW there are a lot of folks out there facing similar adversity. I’ve learned a lot from all of you, so it’s the least I can do to offer up a little ‘life education’ to my readers.

      Life IS like a video-game. I love that analogy. It’s all choices. When it comes to believing in fate or free will – I always answer that I believe in choice. We are constantly faced with choices in our life. Will I stay in Nashville and play it safe or move to Chicago and start the next chapter of my life? There’s no right or wrong, only choice – what I think is best for me, and that’s something that no one else can decide for me.

      I think I’m starting to shy away from the long-term mindset. Of course, there are plans for my future that I would like to see realized somewhere down the line, but I’m starting to really live in the moment – and by doing so, I’m making the most out of every single day.

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    Considering you an online friend outside of Twitter and your blog, I know that you are facing an enormous life change, and I believe that lots of good things will come out of it. Specially growth, you’ll grow and lear like crazy by it!

    When reading your post, I couldn’t help to think of two phrases I read once, and that have really changed the way I see life.

    “There are no mistakes”.
    “Life is a videogame”.

    When you think about it, there’s no safety or risk, no right or wrong, it’s just choices. It’s all just a big game that you get to live the way you want. The beauty behind this point of view, is that once you assimilate it, it’s liberating. You learn the importance behind trusting yourself, like you well put it. You learn to enjoy, isntead of fear.

    This is the best attitude possible towards life. I don’t believe in long term plans. I believe in living your life to the fullest (with responsibility), and sometimes plans get in the way of that. Not knowing means growing. It’s a wonderful thing!

    Great post my man, you are great at relating your personal experience with value for the reader. I’m not even going to tell you to keep it up anymore…

    • Matt Reply

      @Carlos. Your support and encouragement over the past few months has been awesome. You don’t have to tell me to keep it up, I’m doing everything I can to keep it up every single day. I’m happy to share my personal experiences because I KNOW there are a lot of folks out there facing similar adversity. I’ve learned a lot from all of you, so it’s the least I can do to offer up a little ‘life education’ to my readers.

      Life IS like a video-game. I love that analogy. It’s all choices. When it comes to believing in fate or free will – I always answer that I believe in choice. We are constantly faced with choices in our life. Will I stay in Nashville and play it safe or move to Chicago and start the next chapter of my life? There’s no right or wrong, only choice – what I think is best for me, and that’s something that no one else can decide for me.

      I think I’m starting to shy away from the long-term mindset. Of course, there are plans for my future that I would like to see realized somewhere down the line, but I’m starting to really live in the moment – and by doing so, I’m making the most out of every single day.

  • Grace Reply

    Matt as I’ve heard your journey and frustration along the way, I was also pleasantly surprised to hear you were taking the leap. You know my story, maybe I can be a bit of a testament that it is possible. My dad told me as I was taking a huge risk moving to Boulder without a job/house that, “The worst thing that can happen is that you fail. That you move back home. That you start again.”

    We’re so young and to be complacent and never take risks, seems out of the question. I know you’re strong and are going to take on Chicago with vigor. As I have said before, if you need any help or resources from your ‘online’ crew, never be afraid to reach out.

    I wish you the best of luck and I often say (this quote is a magnet on my fridge), “What are you waiting for?”

    • Matt Reply

      @Grace. You are a living, breathing testament of success. And by the way, I really need to plan a trip out to Boulder sometime in the near future – I’ve heard nothing but good things and according to virtually every survey – it is THE place to be for folks in our demographic.

      You know exactly what this is like – although you took it a step further and moved WAY out of your comfort zone – an entirely new place – and look where you are today. Working at a bad-ass company, loving life, and achieving great success in everything you do. I’ve been able to get where I am today because I do ask questions, I have reached out to many of you, and I continue to learn and draw inspiration from what many of you are doing.

      There’s a reason you and I are respected enough by our peers to be voted the top two Gen-Y blogs. Maybe, just maybe, it has something to do with our willingness to take risks and our outside the box thinking. Great minds think alike.

  • Grace Reply

    Matt as I’ve heard your journey and frustration along the way, I was also pleasantly surprised to hear you were taking the leap. You know my story, maybe I can be a bit of a testament that it is possible. My dad told me as I was taking a huge risk moving to Boulder without a job/house that, “The worst thing that can happen is that you fail. That you move back home. That you start again.”

    We’re so young and to be complacent and never take risks, seems out of the question. I know you’re strong and are going to take on Chicago with vigor. As I have said before, if you need any help or resources from your ‘online’ crew, never be afraid to reach out.

    I wish you the best of luck and I often say (this quote is a magnet on my fridge), “What are you waiting for?”

    • Matt Reply

      @Grace. You are a living, breathing testament of success. And by the way, I really need to plan a trip out to Boulder sometime in the near future – I’ve heard nothing but good things and according to virtually every survey – it is THE place to be for folks in our demographic.

      You know exactly what this is like – although you took it a step further and moved WAY out of your comfort zone – an entirely new place – and look where you are today. Working at a bad-ass company, loving life, and achieving great success in everything you do. I’ve been able to get where I am today because I do ask questions, I have reached out to many of you, and I continue to learn and draw inspiration from what many of you are doing.

      There’s a reason you and I are respected enough by our peers to be voted the top two Gen-Y blogs. Maybe, just maybe, it has something to do with our willingness to take risks and our outside the box thinking. Great minds think alike.

  • Lisa Reply

    Wow Matt, I knew you were moving to Chicago but I assumed it was because you had a job offer from one of the places you interviewed at.
    The fact that you are packing up your bags and moving with your fiance without anything lined up is so amazing. Seriously, you are going to grow and learn so much about yourself and about each other.

    You are a smart guy. Clearly, as evidenced from your recent Inconvenience series, you have a serious talent within you– the ability to unite people from all over the world and help encourage your peers to break from the predictable mold and carve out something new for themselves and their future by taking risks. You are going to do just that in Chicago– you will do great things!

    If anything else, I can say I can completely relate to what you are about to experience. I left everything and moved abroad…so terrifying but also completely liberating. I had (and still have) no plan. There have been setbacks and I still don’t know what will happen tomorrow, but at the end of the day, I am learning SO much about myself and others, all while creating something special for my future. You will do the same.

    You will experience such a roller coaster of emotions, but it will all be worth it. You may doubt yourself and your decision to move. You may miss your friends and family and toy with the idea of moving back. You may get lucky and find a job right away, or you may struggle and feel like giving up as the rejection letters roll in. Despite all of this, I can tell you it will be the best experience y
    that you and your fiance will ever endure. You will grow immensely, even more so than you have already, and you will inspire so many people.

    I am so excited for you! :) Best of luck!

    • Matt Reply

      Lisa. I was obviously hoping to have something lined up before the big move, but as you know, sometimes things just don’t go quite the way we want them to. It’s tough, but I’m expecting to become so much stronger through all of this.

      I couldn’t have summed up what I am trying to do here at Life Without Pants better than you just did. Not only do I love to write – I love bringing people together from different backgrounds and lifestyles into one common forum and encouraging discussion. You guys make this blog a success – I’ve had the pleasure of being able to sit back and watch the magic happen right before my eyes. Like I said above, I keep surprising myself.

      You’ve been there – you’re living in the moment as we speak, making things happen on the other side of the world. I just have to keep telling myself what you’ve said here. That through all the doubt, adversity, and confusion, I’m going to be growing my leaps and bounds – and hopefully, as I continue to write, continue to share my journey, my success and failures, and the things I’m learning along the way – you all will stick around and be inspired yourselves.

      Thank you Lisa. Really appreciate the support!

  • Lisa Reply

    Wow Matt, I knew you were moving to Chicago but I assumed it was because you had a job offer from one of the places you interviewed at.
    The fact that you are packing up your bags and moving with your fiance without anything lined up is so amazing. Seriously, you are going to grow and learn so much about yourself and about each other.

    You are a smart guy. Clearly, as evidenced from your recent Inconvenience series, you have a serious talent within you– the ability to unite people from all over the world and help encourage your peers to break from the predictable mold and carve out something new for themselves and their future by taking risks. You are going to do just that in Chicago– you will do great things!

    If anything else, I can say I can completely relate to what you are about to experience. I left everything and moved abroad…so terrifying but also completely liberating. I had (and still have) no plan. There have been setbacks and I still don’t know what will happen tomorrow, but at the end of the day, I am learning SO much about myself and others, all while creating something special for my future. You will do the same.

    You will experience such a roller coaster of emotions, but it will all be worth it. You may doubt yourself and your decision to move. You may miss your friends and family and toy with the idea of moving back. You may get lucky and find a job right away, or you may struggle and feel like giving up as the rejection letters roll in. Despite all of this, I can tell you it will be the best experience y
    that you and your fiance will ever endure. You will grow immensely, even more so than you have already, and you will inspire so many people.

    I am so excited for you! :) Best of luck!

    • Matt Reply

      Lisa. I was obviously hoping to have something lined up before the big move, but as you know, sometimes things just don’t go quite the way we want them to. It’s tough, but I’m expecting to become so much stronger through all of this.

      I couldn’t have summed up what I am trying to do here at Life Without Pants better than you just did. Not only do I love to write – I love bringing people together from different backgrounds and lifestyles into one common forum and encouraging discussion. You guys make this blog a success – I’ve had the pleasure of being able to sit back and watch the magic happen right before my eyes. Like I said above, I keep surprising myself.

      You’ve been there – you’re living in the moment as we speak, making things happen on the other side of the world. I just have to keep telling myself what you’ve said here. That through all the doubt, adversity, and confusion, I’m going to be growing my leaps and bounds – and hopefully, as I continue to write, continue to share my journey, my success and failures, and the things I’m learning along the way – you all will stick around and be inspired yourselves.

      Thank you Lisa. Really appreciate the support!

  • DrJohnDrozdal Reply

    Matt,

    As someone who has even more years on you than Elisa (let’s just say I have had what traditional astrologers refer to as my SECOND Saturn return and I have a decade birthday coming up that is … well let’s not go there), I offer a couple of thoughts.

    I had a coaching client a few years ago who called one day to cancel a session by saying, “Life just happened and it wasn’t on my planner!” Many have their lives so scheduled and so structured that there is no room for “life to happen”. Another way to reframe what you are doing is to view it as creating an opening for life to happen. Just follow the clues and you’ll find things will start to make sense.

    As scary as making a big change is, there are a lot of people that talk about making the change, but never do it because they either talk themselves out of it or people around them do. After my wife passed away, I made the the conscious decision that I wanted to try living in another part of the country. I packed up my worldly possessions, moved to New Mexico and then Colorado and spent a wonderful four years that I would have never experienced if I hadn’t taken the leap. I moved back to Minneapolis in January and felt totally renewed.

    In closing, I recommend that you take a look at the poem by Mary Oliver titled, “The Journey”. You’ll do fine!

    • Matt Reply

      “But little by little,
      as you left their voices behind,
      the stars began to burn
      through the sheets of clouds,
      and there was a new voice
      which you slowly
      recognized as your own,
      that kept you company
      as you strode deeper and deeper
      into the world,
      determined to do
      the only thing you could do–
      determined to save
      the only life you could save.”

      @John. You continue to inspire me sir. This poem really hit me – I feel like all of the fear I’ve had hit me all at once then faded away. I know it sounds dramatic but I’m serious. I really appreciate your wisdom and your ability to connect not only with me but others in my generation and demographic. You get it, you’ve been there, you’ve been through a lot and have come out on the other end with your head held high.

      I look forward to meeting you soon (hopefully). Any time you feel like journeying through the Chicago area, you know I’ll make time to meet up for a bite to eat and a cup of Joe. Cheers John!

  • DrJohnDrozdal Reply

    Matt,

    As someone who has even more years on you than Elisa (let’s just say I have had what traditional astrologers refer to as my SECOND Saturn return and I have a decade birthday coming up that is … well let’s not go there), I offer a couple of thoughts.

    I had a coaching client a few years ago who called one day to cancel a session by saying, “Life just happened and it wasn’t on my planner!” Many have their lives so scheduled and so structured that there is no room for “life to happen”. Another way to reframe what you are doing is to view it as creating an opening for life to happen. Just follow the clues and you’ll find things will start to make sense.

    As scary as making a big change is, there are a lot of people that talk about making the change, but never do it because they either talk themselves out of it or people around them do. After my wife passed away, I made the the conscious decision that I wanted to try living in another part of the country. I packed up my worldly possessions, moved to New Mexico and then Colorado and spent a wonderful four years that I would have never experienced if I hadn’t taken the leap. I moved back to Minneapolis in January and felt totally renewed.

    In closing, I recommend that you take a look at the poem by Mary Oliver titled, “The Journey”. You’ll do fine!

    • Matt Reply

      “But little by little,
      as you left their voices behind,
      the stars began to burn
      through the sheets of clouds,
      and there was a new voice
      which you slowly
      recognized as your own,
      that kept you company
      as you strode deeper and deeper
      into the world,
      determined to do
      the only thing you could do–
      determined to save
      the only life you could save.”

      @John. You continue to inspire me sir. This poem really hit me – I feel like all of the fear I’ve had hit me all at once then faded away. I know it sounds dramatic but I’m serious. I really appreciate your wisdom and your ability to connect not only with me but others in my generation and demographic. You get it, you’ve been there, you’ve been through a lot and have come out on the other end with your head held high.

      I look forward to meeting you soon (hopefully). Any time you feel like journeying through the Chicago area, you know I’ll make time to meet up for a bite to eat and a cup of Joe. Cheers John!

  • Ryan Stephens Reply

    I think every time I read your posts I find something else we have in common. From someone who’s been their (albeit I did have a job waiting for me), it IS scary as hell. There’s no two ways around it. There’s also this nervous apprehension, yet scintillating feeling of excitement as you drive cross country (I was by myself with my thoughts, I suspect you’ll have that fiance thing ;-) with you).

    I can’t tell you for certainty you’ll succeed (though I have no doubt), but what I can assure you is that you’ll learn a TON, and not just about whatever you get yourself into, but more about yourself than you ever fathomed.

    And I’ll leave you with this from Hugh MacLeod’s new book because I thought it was brilliant, “The price of being a sheep is BOREDOM. The price of being a wolf is loneliness. Choose one or the other with great care.”

    I think we’ve already decided, no?

    Best of luck to you Matt!

    • Matt Reply

      @Ryan. Can you go ahead and put together a ‘Summer Reading List’ for me? I feel like every time you leave a comment you share another book that I should be reading! :)

      I recommend to you a book called ‘The Lie’ by Chad Kultgen. If you can get through the vulgarity, the book takes an honest look at the ‘Lie’ of love, of life and living it to the fullest. It’s not the most optimistic of reads, but it makes you think about being a sheep vs. being a wolf, as you say.

      There’s a good mix of nervousness, fear, and excitement. It keeps me on my toes and keeps things interesting. Thank you for your vote of confidence, the continued wisdom, and your friendship. Much appreciated bro!

  • Ryan Stephens Reply

    I think every time I read your posts I find something else we have in common. From someone who’s been their (albeit I did have a job waiting for me), it IS scary as hell. There’s no two ways around it. There’s also this nervous apprehension, yet scintillating feeling of excitement as you drive cross country (I was by myself with my thoughts, I suspect you’ll have that fiance thing ;-) with you).

    I can’t tell you for certainty you’ll succeed (though I have no doubt), but what I can assure you is that you’ll learn a TON, and not just about whatever you get yourself into, but more about yourself than you ever fathomed.

    And I’ll leave you with this from Hugh MacLeod’s new book because I thought it was brilliant, “The price of being a sheep is BOREDOM. The price of being a wolf is loneliness. Choose one or the other with great care.”

    I think we’ve already decided, no?

    Best of luck to you Matt!

    • Matt Reply

      @Ryan. Can you go ahead and put together a ‘Summer Reading List’ for me? I feel like every time you leave a comment you share another book that I should be reading! :)

      I recommend to you a book called ‘The Lie’ by Chad Kultgen. If you can get through the vulgarity, the book takes an honest look at the ‘Lie’ of love, of life and living it to the fullest. It’s not the most optimistic of reads, but it makes you think about being a sheep vs. being a wolf, as you say.

      There’s a good mix of nervousness, fear, and excitement. It keeps me on my toes and keeps things interesting. Thank you for your vote of confidence, the continued wisdom, and your friendship. Much appreciated bro!

  • Ana from far away Reply

    Good Luck! I admire you for having the courage to leave everything behind and move forward. Just be positive, and happy no matter what and all good things will come to your life. I would be scared to… but that experience you are going to have is so exiting! Is now or never!

    • Matt Reply

      @Ana. That’s what I keep telling myself. ‘It’s now or never’. I don’t think there is ever a ‘right time’ for things like this – you just have to make it the right time, it’s up to you, in this case, up to me, to take the reigns and move forward. Thanks for the well wishes Ana, the hardest part is staying positive through adversity, but I also know that’s the most important thing I have to do.

  • Ana from far away Reply

    Good Luck! I admire you for having the courage to leave everything behind and move forward. Just be positive, and happy no matter what and all good things will come to your life. I would be scared to… but that experience you are going to have is so exiting! Is now or never!

    • Matt Reply

      @Ana. That’s what I keep telling myself. ‘It’s now or never’. I don’t think there is ever a ‘right time’ for things like this – you just have to make it the right time, it’s up to you, in this case, up to me, to take the reigns and move forward. Thanks for the well wishes Ana, the hardest part is staying positive through adversity, but I also know that’s the most important thing I have to do.

  • Kristina Reply

    Props to you, Matt, for doing what some of us *cough*me*cough* wish we had the guts to do. With great sacrifice, comes great reward…or so they say. We are only young once, we only live once. I say go for it. You can do it and you have a support team to lean on. Make sure to blog about it along the way!!! :)

    • Matt Reply

      You have the guts Kristina, and you’ll know when the time is right. Don’t doubt yourself (this coming from someone who goes back and forth doubting himself). I can guarantee there will be many-a-story to tell along the way. One of the things that keeps me going is knowing that this journey will provide me with a ton if writing inspiration. There’s no better story to tell than the one you’re actually out there living yourself.

  • Kristina Reply

    Props to you, Matt, for doing what some of us *cough*me*cough* wish we had the guts to do. With great sacrifice, comes great reward…or so they say. We are only young once, we only live once. I say go for it. You can do it and you have a support team to lean on. Make sure to blog about it along the way!!! :)

    • Matt Reply

      You have the guts Kristina, and you’ll know when the time is right. Don’t doubt yourself (this coming from someone who goes back and forth doubting himself). I can guarantee there will be many-a-story to tell along the way. One of the things that keeps me going is knowing that this journey will provide me with a ton if writing inspiration. There’s no better story to tell than the one you’re actually out there living yourself.

  • Kristina Summers Reply

    I am fairly new to your blog, so I can not claim to have followed your journey, however I can relate to the complete and total life change and what it can mean to both you and everyone around you. At 30 I have 3 children, been divorced and have changed careers at least twice. What I can say is that each time I have screwed up the courage to make a leap, it was totally worth it despite my fear. Maybe it is indeed a cliche, but the saying is true. Life is a journey not a destination. Good luck.

    • Matt Reply

      Thank you Kristina. Cliché’s are there for a reason, right?. You also bring up a great point. This leap of faith isn’t a self-centered endeavor. I’m not doing this without regard for the other people around me who care about me. Yes, I am doing this for the future of my fiancé and I, but as I said – Nashville is my home, and it’s never easy leaving that behind. My Mom and Dad, my friends, the coffee shop I go to on Saturday mornings, there are some amazing memories here. But I’m not ‘breaking away’ from the past (I think that might have been a poor choice of words above). My past will always be a part of who I am, this is simply Chapter 2 – the one where I move to a new place, make some new friends, and buy a heavier winter coat! :)

  • Kristina Summers Reply

    I am fairly new to your blog, so I can not claim to have followed your journey, however I can relate to the complete and total life change and what it can mean to both you and everyone around you. At 30 I have 3 children, been divorced and have changed careers at least twice. What I can say is that each time I have screwed up the courage to make a leap, it was totally worth it despite my fear. Maybe it is indeed a cliche, but the saying is true. Life is a journey not a destination. Good luck.

    • Matt Reply

      Thank you Kristina. Cliché’s are there for a reason, right?. You also bring up a great point. This leap of faith isn’t a self-centered endeavor. I’m not doing this without regard for the other people around me who care about me. Yes, I am doing this for the future of my fiancé and I, but as I said – Nashville is my home, and it’s never easy leaving that behind. My Mom and Dad, my friends, the coffee shop I go to on Saturday mornings, there are some amazing memories here. But I’m not ‘breaking away’ from the past (I think that might have been a poor choice of words above). My past will always be a part of who I am, this is simply Chapter 2 – the one where I move to a new place, make some new friends, and buy a heavier winter coat! :)

  • Adriana Reply

    Matt, best of luck to you! I am pasting a few quotes here that sum up what I like to live by. Hope it serves as inspiration to you and your fiancé during this scary but exciting move.

    To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.
    – Oscar Wilde

    Happiness is not a goal; it is a by-product.
    -Eleanor Roosevelt

    Adriana

    • Matt Reply

      @Adriana. Thank you for the well wishes and for sharing some words of wisdom. I think people get living and existing mixed up. We all exist, but it takes passion and motivation to really live. I’m one to live, and I think by doing this, throwing caution to the wind and being bold, I’m living life more than I ever have. It’s an overwhelmingly free-ing experience. I suggest everyone try it sometime.

  • Adriana Reply

    Matt, best of luck to you! I am pasting a few quotes here that sum up what I like to live by. Hope it serves as inspiration to you and your fiancé during this scary but exciting move.

    To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all.
    – Oscar Wilde

    Happiness is not a goal; it is a by-product.
    -Eleanor Roosevelt

    Adriana

    • Matt Reply

      @Adriana. Thank you for the well wishes and for sharing some words of wisdom. I think people get living and existing mixed up. We all exist, but it takes passion and motivation to really live. I’m one to live, and I think by doing this, throwing caution to the wind and being bold, I’m living life more than I ever have. It’s an overwhelmingly free-ing experience. I suggest everyone try it sometime.

  • C. Zimmermann Reply

    It’s good that you’re the kind of guy who likes to make a plan. When someone hires you, (and they will) that’s going to be important to them. Especially if you’re the kind of guy who’s ready with a Plan B when Plan A doesn’t hit the mark. But it’s just as important to know when the time is right to take a chance. One of my favorite movies is Joe vs the Volcano, and my favorite moment is when Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks take that leap of faith together and jump into the volcano. She says “Nobody knows anything, Joe. We’ll take this leap, and we’ll see. We’ll jump, and we’ll see. That’s life, right?” Best of luck to you.

    • Matt Reply

      Planning is great – I bank on the fact that I’m well-prepared for most situations. But sometimes, you can’t map it all out, you have to have a little faith and go with you gut – and that’s what I’m doing here. All I can say right now is ‘we’ll see’. The unknown is scary, but I have faith in myself and the support I have from those around me. That faith has me looking forward – starting at the horizon saying ‘I can’t wait to see where I end up’!

  • C. Zimmermann Reply

    It’s good that you’re the kind of guy who likes to make a plan. When someone hires you, (and they will) that’s going to be important to them. Especially if you’re the kind of guy who’s ready with a Plan B when Plan A doesn’t hit the mark. But it’s just as important to know when the time is right to take a chance. One of my favorite movies is Joe vs the Volcano, and my favorite moment is when Meg Ryan and Tom Hanks take that leap of faith together and jump into the volcano. She says “Nobody knows anything, Joe. We’ll take this leap, and we’ll see. We’ll jump, and we’ll see. That’s life, right?” Best of luck to you.

    • Matt Reply

      Planning is great – I bank on the fact that I’m well-prepared for most situations. But sometimes, you can’t map it all out, you have to have a little faith and go with you gut – and that’s what I’m doing here. All I can say right now is ‘we’ll see’. The unknown is scary, but I have faith in myself and the support I have from those around me. That faith has me looking forward – starting at the horizon saying ‘I can’t wait to see where I end up’!

  • Anita Lobo Reply

    Hi Matt!

    ‘I’m happy. I’m nervous and scared as hell. But I’m happy.’ – Sounds like the start of a roller coaster ride :)

    A wise friend once shared the secret to living a full life: is to willingly put ourselves through an experiment where we don’t know what the outcome will be. Quite akin to what you’re doing.

    You’re more well-prepared than most people and I wish you exciting times ahead! Live your dreams and be happy.

    Cheers,

    Anita Lobo

    • Matt Reply

      Ah, another cliché that happens to ring true. Life is like one big roller coaster, isn’t it. It’s like I’m finally coming off the Teacup and stepping up to the big (scary) rides. That sense of not knowing what to expect, but being excited about the results is exactly what I’m going through.

      Your wisdom never ceases to amaze Anita. I look forward to continuing to share in our wisdom in future endeavors. Thank you for the words of encouragement!

  • Anita Lobo Reply

    Hi Matt!

    ‘I’m happy. I’m nervous and scared as hell. But I’m happy.’ – Sounds like the start of a roller coaster ride :)

    A wise friend once shared the secret to living a full life: is to willingly put ourselves through an experiment where we don’t know what the outcome will be. Quite akin to what you’re doing.

    You’re more well-prepared than most people and I wish you exciting times ahead! Live your dreams and be happy.

    Cheers,

    Anita Lobo

    • Matt Reply

      Ah, another cliché that happens to ring true. Life is like one big roller coaster, isn’t it. It’s like I’m finally coming off the Teacup and stepping up to the big (scary) rides. That sense of not knowing what to expect, but being excited about the results is exactly what I’m going through.

      Your wisdom never ceases to amaze Anita. I look forward to continuing to share in our wisdom in future endeavors. Thank you for the words of encouragement!

  • Mandy Reply

    Matt–you know what they say about adversity and trials and tribulations…that the darkest hour is before dawn…

    It sounds like to me that you’re entering the darkest hour of indecision, fear and anxiety but you know that you’ll come out the other end stronger and more resilient than before. I’ve only known you for a really short while but I can see through your work here that you will find the way.

    Remember that you don’t walk your journey alone and that there are others who will be there to support you. When I first moved away from home, I cried for three months straight. It took a lot for me to break with my cultural traditions and defy my parents but it definitely opened my eyes and changed my perspective and life in a way that, while still isn’t fantastic, is different than before.

    And I’ll pass along the advice a friend of mine gave me: don’t have expectations but create your opportunity. It’s what you do that makes it worthwhile or not.

    Cheers, mate. You’ll do great. :)

    • Matt Reply

      I love that quote and I agree with it 100% – it is always darkest before the dawn. But the dawn always breaks. The sun always rises. The support I have from family and friends (for the most part) has been great. And talking through it all with you fine folks has been great. We shape our own life and how we want to live it. I realize I’m really putting myself out there with this decision, but I know that dawn will break before too long. Thanks, Mandy!

  • Mandy Reply

    Matt–you know what they say about adversity and trials and tribulations…that the darkest hour is before dawn…

    It sounds like to me that you’re entering the darkest hour of indecision, fear and anxiety but you know that you’ll come out the other end stronger and more resilient than before. I’ve only known you for a really short while but I can see through your work here that you will find the way.

    Remember that you don’t walk your journey alone and that there are others who will be there to support you. When I first moved away from home, I cried for three months straight. It took a lot for me to break with my cultural traditions and defy my parents but it definitely opened my eyes and changed my perspective and life in a way that, while still isn’t fantastic, is different than before.

    And I’ll pass along the advice a friend of mine gave me: don’t have expectations but create your opportunity. It’s what you do that makes it worthwhile or not.

    Cheers, mate. You’ll do great. :)

    • Matt Reply

      I love that quote and I agree with it 100% – it is always darkest before the dawn. But the dawn always breaks. The sun always rises. The support I have from family and friends (for the most part) has been great. And talking through it all with you fine folks has been great. We shape our own life and how we want to live it. I realize I’m really putting myself out there with this decision, but I know that dawn will break before too long. Thanks, Mandy!

  • Susan Pogorzelski Reply

    Matt,

    The journey you’re undertaking is one you’re going to remember for the rest of your life…I’m sure it’s a feeling of trepidation and excitement, of nervousness and a little bit of fear. But it should also be one of great courage and empowerment and pride. Because you’re taking that step and daring to follow through with something you want.

    I believe it’s true that you never know what you’re really capable of until you challenge yourself, and you can’t challenge yourself unless you try.

    And in the wise words of Coldplay, “if you never try you’ll never know.”

    Smart guys, them. ;)

    So proud of you, Matt — embrace this adventure and best of luck!

    (And great blog post!)

    • Matt Reply

      @Susan. Thank you so much – I really appreciate your wisdom through all this. And you’re right, this journey will live on in my memory forever. In fact, this blog post is one that I will bookmark – and one year, five years, ten years from now, I want to be able to come back here and look at it again and again – to see what I was thinking and to witness this overwhelming support from the online community (which was/is totally unexpected).

      So here’s to putting myself out there and trying. It may be a bumpy road but there is not a doubt in my mind that I’ll succeed.

  • Susan Pogorzelski Reply

    Matt,

    The journey you’re undertaking is one you’re going to remember for the rest of your life…I’m sure it’s a feeling of trepidation and excitement, of nervousness and a little bit of fear. But it should also be one of great courage and empowerment and pride. Because you’re taking that step and daring to follow through with something you want.

    I believe it’s true that you never know what you’re really capable of until you challenge yourself, and you can’t challenge yourself unless you try.

    And in the wise words of Coldplay, “if you never try you’ll never know.”

    Smart guys, them. ;)

    So proud of you, Matt — embrace this adventure and best of luck!

    (And great blog post!)

    • Matt Reply

      @Susan. Thank you so much – I really appreciate your wisdom through all this. And you’re right, this journey will live on in my memory forever. In fact, this blog post is one that I will bookmark – and one year, five years, ten years from now, I want to be able to come back here and look at it again and again – to see what I was thinking and to witness this overwhelming support from the online community (which was/is totally unexpected).

      So here’s to putting myself out there and trying. It may be a bumpy road but there is not a doubt in my mind that I’ll succeed.

  • julianisntdead Reply

    Haha, this is so strange to read from the other end of the spectrum. I feel like I have to be partially responsible for you as if you’ve somehow hopped on shotgun in my adventure. But really, you’re in a whole other adventure of your own. either way, it’ll be nice to have some war buddies to swap stories with in the midst of this crazy time.

    if it makes you feel any better, I don’t know where I’m living next week. I’m just taking a plane and then figuring it out when I get there. Haha. It’s pretty crazy. Also, you’ll soon realize that the story is the part worth telling. living it out is a whole other type of stress and joy. it’s worth it in a weird way. but while it happens, you sort of feel lifeless. as if the world is happening around you and your just a character in someone else’s important life story.

    i’m not sure how this is supposed to turn out as I have not reached the end. but I can guarantee you, the payoff is nothing close to what we could expect. but I’m glad you’re rockin the boat. Especially since you’ve been playing it safe so far. Tell you what, if nothign works out, I’ll take your job off yoru hands. haha. You’re going to regret that one first, guarantee it. :) but don’t worry about it. life is all about perspective. if you got fired, you’d be frustrated. but quitting feels productive. who knows. we’ll see how it rocks.

    • Matt Reply

      @Julian. I love your last point. Getting fired would suck but somehow quitting feels freeing and productive – like I’m making something of my life.

      Our adventures are different but similar – and your story has been and continues to be an inspiration for me. We may be pursuing different things in the end, but we’re both dreamers. We’re not merely existing, we’re LIVING – and that’s what life is really all about. It might not make sense – it might seem totally stupid and crazy, but you know what you’re doing – even if no one else does. The same can be said for me – I have people all around me telling me ‘no’ and calling me crazy but it doesn’t matter – it’s my life, and no one can take that away – I think you are feeling that ‘suck the marrow out of life’ attitude as well.

      We’ll have many a story to tell – that’s for sure. As I’m sure you can relate – times like these, moments of great adversity and change, they provide us with some of our greatest inspiration. It’s going to be a hell of a ride, I’m glad to have you to remind me that I’m only partially crazy – you, my good man, are totally insane. I love it!

  • julianisntdead Reply

    Haha, this is so strange to read from the other end of the spectrum. I feel like I have to be partially responsible for you as if you’ve somehow hopped on shotgun in my adventure. But really, you’re in a whole other adventure of your own. either way, it’ll be nice to have some war buddies to swap stories with in the midst of this crazy time.

    if it makes you feel any better, I don’t know where I’m living next week. I’m just taking a plane and then figuring it out when I get there. Haha. It’s pretty crazy. Also, you’ll soon realize that the story is the part worth telling. living it out is a whole other type of stress and joy. it’s worth it in a weird way. but while it happens, you sort of feel lifeless. as if the world is happening around you and your just a character in someone else’s important life story.

    i’m not sure how this is supposed to turn out as I have not reached the end. but I can guarantee you, the payoff is nothing close to what we could expect. but I’m glad you’re rockin the boat. Especially since you’ve been playing it safe so far. Tell you what, if nothign works out, I’ll take your job off yoru hands. haha. You’re going to regret that one first, guarantee it. :) but don’t worry about it. life is all about perspective. if you got fired, you’d be frustrated. but quitting feels productive. who knows. we’ll see how it rocks.

    • Matt Reply

      @Julian. I love your last point. Getting fired would suck but somehow quitting feels freeing and productive – like I’m making something of my life.

      Our adventures are different but similar – and your story has been and continues to be an inspiration for me. We may be pursuing different things in the end, but we’re both dreamers. We’re not merely existing, we’re LIVING – and that’s what life is really all about. It might not make sense – it might seem totally stupid and crazy, but you know what you’re doing – even if no one else does. The same can be said for me – I have people all around me telling me ‘no’ and calling me crazy but it doesn’t matter – it’s my life, and no one can take that away – I think you are feeling that ‘suck the marrow out of life’ attitude as well.

      We’ll have many a story to tell – that’s for sure. As I’m sure you can relate – times like these, moments of great adversity and change, they provide us with some of our greatest inspiration. It’s going to be a hell of a ride, I’m glad to have you to remind me that I’m only partially crazy – you, my good man, are totally insane. I love it!

  • Benjamin Reply

    Matt, this is amazing news, I was really excited when I saw the official “Matt is moving to Chicago” tweet. I am glad to hear that you have finally decided to take the plunge and move to the Chi! I know that you have been struggling to find a job, but it will be much easier when you are there all of the time. Network, network, network!

    It is very inspiring to hear your story, and I can not wait to hear updates. As others have said already, you will learn so many things about yourself that you realized before. You are taking a great leap and living with no regrets.

    As for networking, I seem to think a certain Bears vs. Browns football game on November 1st in Soldier field is a good time for some networking, me being from Cleveland and all. :-)

    Congratulations for figuring out exactly what you want and going for it. We are all behind you and wish you the best of luck. I declare this summer, “The Summer of Matt.”

    • Matt Reply

      @Ben. Haha, “The Summer of Matt” – hopefully mine will end up a little better than our good friend Mr. Costanza.

      I’m inspired that people are inspired by my leap of faith. It puts everything in perspective and lets me know that everyone doesn’t think I’m totally insane. Without turning this into a sappy diary, I will of course update throughout the journey, and hopefully will continue to inspire others who are wondering ‘what if’ to get out there and do something with their lives.

      Bears v. Browns – you buying tickets? Funds might be a little tight around November but if all else fails I see a cozy sports bar and a bucket of beers with our name on it. Although, I don’t see very high hopes for your Brownies.

  • Benjamin Reply

    Matt, this is amazing news, I was really excited when I saw the official “Matt is moving to Chicago” tweet. I am glad to hear that you have finally decided to take the plunge and move to the Chi! I know that you have been struggling to find a job, but it will be much easier when you are there all of the time. Network, network, network!

    It is very inspiring to hear your story, and I can not wait to hear updates. As others have said already, you will learn so many things about yourself that you realized before. You are taking a great leap and living with no regrets.

    As for networking, I seem to think a certain Bears vs. Browns football game on November 1st in Soldier field is a good time for some networking, me being from Cleveland and all. :-)

    Congratulations for figuring out exactly what you want and going for it. We are all behind you and wish you the best of luck. I declare this summer, “The Summer of Matt.”

    • Matt Reply

      @Ben. Haha, “The Summer of Matt” – hopefully mine will end up a little better than our good friend Mr. Costanza.

      I’m inspired that people are inspired by my leap of faith. It puts everything in perspective and lets me know that everyone doesn’t think I’m totally insane. Without turning this into a sappy diary, I will of course update throughout the journey, and hopefully will continue to inspire others who are wondering ‘what if’ to get out there and do something with their lives.

      Bears v. Browns – you buying tickets? Funds might be a little tight around November but if all else fails I see a cozy sports bar and a bucket of beers with our name on it. Although, I don’t see very high hopes for your Brownies.

  • Pritesh Reply

    Matt:

    Thanks for sending me a link for this post. I was away from Blogosphere for couple of weeks and had no idea what’s going on!

    Well, you wouldn’t know what’s going to happen down the link unless you walk on that line. And specially, you do not want to live with ‘What-if’ question your whole life. Personally, I have been into situation where I took the path without even having any plans. I have also been to the road where I planned my journey. So, I have experienced on both sides. From my experiences, both are the same thing. Honestly, I can’t tell you what is good because it depends on unique situation. It’s good to have everything planned out and sometimes it’s better to just take the journey and unfolds the cards without knowing what’s next. As long as you learn something out of your journey, as long as you know yourself better and decide where you want to be – you’ll be fine.

    From your post, I can see that you have known yourself better out of this life-changing experience. This is the best rewards you can get. Sometimes it takes life-span to know yourself and you are already on the right track.

    No matter which way you go, you have to believe in yourself and responsible for whatever decision you take. I am sure that you are going to do great things. It’s just the matter of time!

    Good luck, Matt.

    Cheers..
    Pritesh
    http://twitter.com/mehta1p

    • Matt Reply

      @Pritesh. It truly is the journey – not the destination – that matters most. I appreciate your kind words and well wishes here. I am getting to know myself in a whole new way. Looking at life through a different lens, taking a risk and really putting myself out there. There are undoubtedly going to be a few bumps in the road, but I remain confident in my abilities and vigilant as I keep moving, step by step, through this journey of life. All I can say to you and everyone else is ‘Never stop moving’. Because when you do, when you become content in your apathy, what are you living for?

  • Pritesh Reply

    Matt:

    Thanks for sending me a link for this post. I was away from Blogosphere for couple of weeks and had no idea what’s going on!

    Well, you wouldn’t know what’s going to happen down the link unless you walk on that line. And specially, you do not want to live with ‘What-if’ question your whole life. Personally, I have been into situation where I took the path without even having any plans. I have also been to the road where I planned my journey. So, I have experienced on both sides. From my experiences, both are the same thing. Honestly, I can’t tell you what is good because it depends on unique situation. It’s good to have everything planned out and sometimes it’s better to just take the journey and unfolds the cards without knowing what’s next. As long as you learn something out of your journey, as long as you know yourself better and decide where you want to be – you’ll be fine.

    From your post, I can see that you have known yourself better out of this life-changing experience. This is the best rewards you can get. Sometimes it takes life-span to know yourself and you are already on the right track.

    No matter which way you go, you have to believe in yourself and responsible for whatever decision you take. I am sure that you are going to do great things. It’s just the matter of time!

    Good luck, Matt.

    Cheers..
    Pritesh
    http://twitter.com/mehta1p

    • Matt Reply

      @Pritesh. It truly is the journey – not the destination – that matters most. I appreciate your kind words and well wishes here. I am getting to know myself in a whole new way. Looking at life through a different lens, taking a risk and really putting myself out there. There are undoubtedly going to be a few bumps in the road, but I remain confident in my abilities and vigilant as I keep moving, step by step, through this journey of life. All I can say to you and everyone else is ‘Never stop moving’. Because when you do, when you become content in your apathy, what are you living for?

  • Kenji Crosland Reply

    Congratulations on taking the leap! And thanks for having the courage to share your fears and uncertainties with us. Too often we see the results of people’s success and not the struggles they had to endure to achieve it.

    I’ve allowed fear to direct my career decisions for the longest time. The only thing that made me decide to make a change was when I was working as a head hunter and I met countless folks at the end of their careers who didn’t make that decision. Fear of a life wasted became much bigger to me than fear of a few uncomfortable and uncertain years.

    You’ve made the right choice. There’ll certainly be times when you’re going to doubt whether you did or not, but those will pass. Good luck!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks Kenji – this all went down about 6 months and it is wild to see how much I have grown and changed since then – this time in my life (when this was written) has really defined who I am today. Fear is a pretty powerful emotion that can completely consume us if we let it. Doubt will always be a part of every decision but it’s overcoming that fear and doubt that will set you above the rest.

      Cheers my friend – and Happy New Year!

      • Kenji Crosland Reply

        Glad to see that things are working out well. I didn’t notice the date on this one ’till after I left my comment. Happy new year to you as well!

  • Kenji Crosland Reply

    Congratulations on taking the leap! And thanks for having the courage to share your fears and uncertainties with us. Too often we see the results of people’s success and not the struggles they had to endure to achieve it.

    I’ve allowed fear to direct my career decisions for the longest time. The only thing that made me decide to make a change was when I was working as a head hunter and I met countless folks at the end of their careers who didn’t make that decision. Fear of a life wasted became much bigger to me than fear of a few uncomfortable and uncertain years.

    You’ve made the right choice. There’ll certainly be times when you’re going to doubt whether you did or not, but those will pass. Good luck!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks Kenji – this all went down about 6 months and it is wild to see how much I have grown and changed since then – this time in my life (when this was written) has really defined who I am today. Fear is a pretty powerful emotion that can completely consume us if we let it. Doubt will always be a part of every decision but it’s overcoming that fear and doubt that will set you above the rest.

      Cheers my friend – and Happy New Year!

      • Kenji Crosland Reply

        Glad to see that things are working out well. I didn’t notice the date on this one ’till after I left my comment. Happy new year to you as well!

  • Gina Z Reply

    Amazing stuff here, way to take the jump and go for your dreams. I have been on your site for literally 30 minutes perusing your goodies. Thank you so much for sharing. I am definitely on my path there and was lit up by a workshop that I recently attended. You and @LaraCasey should definitely connect, she is starting her national tour and you both are putting out some powerful things right now. I am SO on board and really want to inspire my readers as well. I can’t wait to write a post about your e-book here, cause it really works in with what I am going through right now.

    Again, here is a HUGE high five from a MN girl on taking that big step.

    WOOT!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi Gina! Thanks so much for stopping by – glad you stumbled across this post as it is literally one of my favorites I’ve written – and was written at a time where I had a LOT up in the air – change, transition, overcoming obstacles, frustration, fear – just to name a few of the things swirling around my head when I put this together. It’s amazing to sit back and read these posts and see just how far I’ve come in a short period of time. I can’t thank you enough for the support and am humbled by the fact that you would write up a piece about The Inconvenience of Change.

      I’ll def. reach out to Lara – checked out your site as well – your photography portfolio is amazing, and your attitude toward life is incredible. Hope you and I will be able to chat a lot more in the future. Don’t be a stranger!

  • Gina Z Reply

    Amazing stuff here, way to take the jump and go for your dreams. I have been on your site for literally 30 minutes perusing your goodies. Thank you so much for sharing. I am definitely on my path there and was lit up by a workshop that I recently attended. You and @LaraCasey should definitely connect, she is starting her national tour and you both are putting out some powerful things right now. I am SO on board and really want to inspire my readers as well. I can’t wait to write a post about your e-book here, cause it really works in with what I am going through right now.

    Again, here is a HUGE high five from a MN girl on taking that big step.

    WOOT!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi Gina! Thanks so much for stopping by – glad you stumbled across this post as it is literally one of my favorites I’ve written – and was written at a time where I had a LOT up in the air – change, transition, overcoming obstacles, frustration, fear – just to name a few of the things swirling around my head when I put this together. It’s amazing to sit back and read these posts and see just how far I’ve come in a short period of time. I can’t thank you enough for the support and am humbled by the fact that you would write up a piece about The Inconvenience of Change.

      I’ll def. reach out to Lara – checked out your site as well – your photography portfolio is amazing, and your attitude toward life is incredible. Hope you and I will be able to chat a lot more in the future. Don’t be a stranger!

  • Amy Reply

    Matt, thank you for this post. About a year ago I did almost exactly the same thing. My boyfriend got a job in Boulder, so we packed up and moved here from Alabama, where I’d spent my entire life (Southern folk represent!).

    I spent 2 months looking for a job before we left with no luck. My company in AL was wonderful and allowed me to work remotely for the first 4 months after I left. Working from home, alone, in a strange new place was not super fun, but it did make the landing a little softer.

    After my AL job ended, I picked up some freelance and part time work where I could. Some was amazing and opened my eyes to new concepts and skills, the rest were more like detention. I’m currently still in “detention” while looking for the next great opportunity. It’s been so frustrating to have not found any full-time work yet (my search is going on 14 months now). I’d say I’m discouraged, but that might be candy-coating it.

    On the bright side! I live in one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen, and I’ve met tons of happy, helpful, inspiring and inspired folks! And my boyfriend loves his job! I have so many reasons to be thankful it doesn’t make much sense to complain about being stuck in a professional rut. I’m taking time to nurture my life. Professional success will follow.

    I look forward to reading more about your journey!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi Amy – thanks for coming by and sharing your story – and I have NO DOUBT that you will find something great before you know it. It’s pretty damn difficult in this day and age to find something without settling – the key is to keep your options open and consider some opportunities and fields you may not have originally thought of. I went from working at a major ad agency to becoming the Internet Marketing Developer for a Pediatric Therapy Company – where I am today is never where I thought I would be – but it has been an outstanding opportunity and I’m learning a ton, meet some amazing people, and developing both personally and professionally along the way.

      Look forward to hearing about your future success!

  • Amy Reply

    Matt, thank you for this post. About a year ago I did almost exactly the same thing. My boyfriend got a job in Boulder, so we packed up and moved here from Alabama, where I’d spent my entire life (Southern folk represent!).

    I spent 2 months looking for a job before we left with no luck. My company in AL was wonderful and allowed me to work remotely for the first 4 months after I left. Working from home, alone, in a strange new place was not super fun, but it did make the landing a little softer.

    After my AL job ended, I picked up some freelance and part time work where I could. Some was amazing and opened my eyes to new concepts and skills, the rest were more like detention. I’m currently still in “detention” while looking for the next great opportunity. It’s been so frustrating to have not found any full-time work yet (my search is going on 14 months now). I’d say I’m discouraged, but that might be candy-coating it.

    On the bright side! I live in one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen, and I’ve met tons of happy, helpful, inspiring and inspired folks! And my boyfriend loves his job! I have so many reasons to be thankful it doesn’t make much sense to complain about being stuck in a professional rut. I’m taking time to nurture my life. Professional success will follow.

    I look forward to reading more about your journey!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi Amy – thanks for coming by and sharing your story – and I have NO DOUBT that you will find something great before you know it. It’s pretty damn difficult in this day and age to find something without settling – the key is to keep your options open and consider some opportunities and fields you may not have originally thought of. I went from working at a major ad agency to becoming the Internet Marketing Developer for a Pediatric Therapy Company – where I am today is never where I thought I would be – but it has been an outstanding opportunity and I’m learning a ton, meet some amazing people, and developing both personally and professionally along the way.

      Look forward to hearing about your future success!

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