“Nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else”

Do you feel it? That collective Gen Y voice telling you that in order to be happy you have to take a huge risk – that you MUST break away from the corporate world, that entrepreneurship is the way of enlightenment and by doing anything else, you’re settling for less than your worth.

We are so anxious (including myself) to preach that work/life balance is a myth – and the only way is to integrate the two into one happy passionate lifestyle where you absolutely love what you do every single day.

My question: Do you need to LOVE your job to be happy? To me, love is a strong word – a word that shouldn’t even be used for your work. Love your spouse, love your kids, love your dog; A job? That doesn’t require love. It requires commitment, dedication, hard work, maybe even passion – but not love. If you like you’re job – if you’re committed to doing good work, the rest will fall into place, and it won’t feel like “work”.

“I am learning all the time. The tombstone will be my diploma.”

Growth is all that matters. If you’re growing and learning in everything you do, then you’re moving in the right direction, you’re taking steps toward where you ultimately want to be. If you’re not – then get out and find something that will help you grow (or change your attitude).

Attitude is an extremely powerful thing – some would say it’s everything. If you keep telling yourself that you’re stuck in a rut with no way out, you’ll ultimately always hold yourself back. But if your attitude is that you aren’t putting anything off – that you’re working your way toward achieving your goals and dreams, then you WILL get there. Keep working, continue networking and meeting new people, use the tools around you to your advantage, write, communicate, and continually shape and mold your reputation.

I’m not ready for the destination – I’m too young, too inexperienced, and interested in too many different things to settle down and focus on one. The destination is the end and I’m only a few steps from the starting line. Enjoy the journey.

Save your love for what really matters. When I move on from this life and leave this world, I’d much rather be remembered as a loving husband, an admirable father, and a good man before people say I was a hard worker and a successful entrepreneur. Welcome your career as a part of your life, but don’t let it BE your life. Let life be about living.

Join the conversation! 111 Comments

  1. Love this part: “Growth is all that matters. If you’re growing and learning in everything you do, then you’re moving in the right direction, you’re taking steps toward where you ultimately want to be.” – One of the best life philosophies, in my opinion.

    Reply
    • Life’s all about growth and learning. If you’re at the point where you’re not continuing to evolve and develop, you need to shake off whatever is holding you back and move on – start something new, and reinvent yourself. If you’re not learning, you’re not living.

      Reply
    • I like that part too. In a way it solidifies a gut feeling I’ve been struggling with for a while now, in the fact that I don’t love my job, and while I know that “love” isn’t necessarily a feeling you look for in a job, I also acknowledge that I have no passion for it either. It’s not where I want to end up, and I don’t see it getting me there either. I don’t feel that I’m moving in the right direction, but I know that I’m growing and learning because figuring out how to deal with that situation is going to shape me into the person I’m going to become next. The only problem now is figuring out what lies between here and there…

      Reply
      • I hear you Megan – but you have the right attitude here. Don’t worry so much about the destination, take things in stride. But, if you feel your in a dead end situation, don’t dwell on it. The economy is tough but their are opportunities out there. I’ve had both good and bad jobs early on in my career-life and I firmly believe life is too short to stick something out for the sake of doing it. Learn from every experience, but keep your legs moving if you aren’t satisfied with where you are. Thanks for the comment!

        Reply
  2. Love this part: “Growth is all that matters. If you’re growing and learning in everything you do, then you’re moving in the right direction, you’re taking steps toward where you ultimately want to be.” – One of the best life philosophies, in my opinion.

    Reply
    • Life’s all about growth and learning. If you’re at the point where you’re not continuing to evolve and develop, you need to shake off whatever is holding you back and move on – start something new, and reinvent yourself. If you’re not learning, you’re not living.

      Reply
    • I like that part too. In a way it solidifies a gut feeling I’ve been struggling with for a while now, in the fact that I don’t love my job, and while I know that “love” isn’t necessarily a feeling you look for in a job, I also acknowledge that I have no passion for it either. It’s not where I want to end up, and I don’t see it getting me there either. I don’t feel that I’m moving in the right direction, but I know that I’m growing and learning because figuring out how to deal with that situation is going to shape me into the person I’m going to become next. The only problem now is figuring out what lies between here and there…

      Reply
      • I hear you Megan – but you have the right attitude here. Don’t worry so much about the destination, take things in stride. But, if you feel your in a dead end situation, don’t dwell on it. The economy is tough but their are opportunities out there. I’ve had both good and bad jobs early on in my career-life and I firmly believe life is too short to stick something out for the sake of doing it. Learn from every experience, but keep your legs moving if you aren’t satisfied with where you are. Thanks for the comment!

        Reply
  3. Hey Matt – I hear ya, but I think there needs to be some level of connecting with the work you do. If you spend most of your waking hours punching a clock, playing solitaire or hiding from your boss, then your life is not about growth, its about survival. With love, not everyday is the best day in the world, but you know that you are working on something special that when you wake up, you are ready to give it go and do the best you can.

    Not everyone is fortunate to do the stuff they love (or even like), but if you are smart enough to read a site like yours, you have the opportunity to do something about the way you feel when you wake up. You have the opportunity to network and find something you like, you can explore, research, blog, and educate yourself on things that will make you happy. In the end you are growing, like you said, but yea, I do need to have a connection with what I do (and I work both for myself and for a company). As soon as it doesn’t fit my agenda, I bounce. Luckily, I found projects that do align with the stuff I like.

    Reply
    • Believe me when I say that I 100% agree you have to be committed and connected to the work you do to get anything out of it. If you’re not interested, you clearly aren’t growing or learning much of anything.

      But to that point – I think we (collectively) are quick to write off a less-than-ideal work experience as a waste. It comes back to attitude. For example, I worked at a large advertising firm before I moved here to Chicago – hated it – hated the managerial approach and monotonous work schedule. But I still learned how to operate in a business setting, and most importantly, I learned about what I DIDN’T want to do with my life. I grew from the experience, and have since moved on to bigger and better things, using my experience there as leverage.

      There is something to be learned from every experience. I use the word “love” sparingly because I think it deserves a deeper meaning than what you do from nine to five.

      Thanks for the comment Greg, great thoughts!

      Reply
  4. Hey Matt – I hear ya, but I think there needs to be some level of connecting with the work you do. If you spend most of your waking hours punching a clock, playing solitaire or hiding from your boss, then your life is not about growth, its about survival. With love, not everyday is the best day in the world, but you know that you are working on something special that when you wake up, you are ready to give it go and do the best you can.

    Not everyone is fortunate to do the stuff they love (or even like), but if you are smart enough to read a site like yours, you have the opportunity to do something about the way you feel when you wake up. You have the opportunity to network and find something you like, you can explore, research, blog, and educate yourself on things that will make you happy. In the end you are growing, like you said, but yea, I do need to have a connection with what I do (and I work both for myself and for a company). As soon as it doesn’t fit my agenda, I bounce. Luckily, I found projects that do align with the stuff I like.

    Reply
    • Believe me when I say that I 100% agree you have to be committed and connected to the work you do to get anything out of it. If you’re not interested, you clearly aren’t growing or learning much of anything.

      But to that point – I think we (collectively) are quick to write off a less-than-ideal work experience as a waste. It comes back to attitude. For example, I worked at a large advertising firm before I moved here to Chicago – hated it – hated the managerial approach and monotonous work schedule. But I still learned how to operate in a business setting, and most importantly, I learned about what I DIDN’T want to do with my life. I grew from the experience, and have since moved on to bigger and better things, using my experience there as leverage.

      There is something to be learned from every experience. I use the word “love” sparingly because I think it deserves a deeper meaning than what you do from nine to five.

      Thanks for the comment Greg, great thoughts!

      Reply
  5. I think that you should love you’re job.

    Loving your spouse requires commitment, dedication and hard work…
    Loving your kids requires commitment, dedication and hard work…
    Even loving a pet requires commitment, dedication and hard work…

    So if those are the things that will determine your happiness and success at your job, I think that you should absolutely be able to and *should* love your job.

    And I think that love is part of the journey and part of living your fullest life (my Oprah moment). If you don’t look forward to waking up and going to work every day, then maybe you’re in the wrong field?

    I absolutely 100% agree that I never want to be defined by my job and that when I leave this world I’d like to be remembered by my family and friends as someone who was there for them and someone who lived life with passion.

    But at the same time, I know that I’m young enough to make a career change if I stop loving it, and if that means that I decided to go back to school to find something I love more or move down to Florida and become a dolphin trainer, then so be it :)

    “in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make…” so why not find something you love and let that love/happiness be magnified in every other part of your life?

    Great post! :D
    -@goktgo

    Reply
    • I like your way of thinking here Katie – but I think the commitment, dedication, and hard work you put into your personal life is much different from the career world. We may be running around semantics of the word “love” but I don’t think one can or should love their job as they do their spouse/kids/even pet (I love my dog).

      With that being said – waking up and enjoying what you do is the key to happiness. I don’t think you should completely separate work and life – the two don’t have to be exclusive, but to reject LIFE in favor of work? Well, that’s just nuts!

      Reply
  6. I think that you should love you’re job.

    Loving your spouse requires commitment, dedication and hard work…
    Loving your kids requires commitment, dedication and hard work…
    Even loving a pet requires commitment, dedication and hard work…

    So if those are the things that will determine your happiness and success at your job, I think that you should absolutely be able to and *should* love your job.

    And I think that love is part of the journey and part of living your fullest life (my Oprah moment). If you don’t look forward to waking up and going to work every day, then maybe you’re in the wrong field?

    I absolutely 100% agree that I never want to be defined by my job and that when I leave this world I’d like to be remembered by my family and friends as someone who was there for them and someone who lived life with passion.

    But at the same time, I know that I’m young enough to make a career change if I stop loving it, and if that means that I decided to go back to school to find something I love more or move down to Florida and become a dolphin trainer, then so be it :)

    “in the end the love you take is equal to the love you make…” so why not find something you love and let that love/happiness be magnified in every other part of your life?

    Great post! :D
    -@goktgo

    Reply
    • I like your way of thinking here Katie – but I think the commitment, dedication, and hard work you put into your personal life is much different from the career world. We may be running around semantics of the word “love” but I don’t think one can or should love their job as they do their spouse/kids/even pet (I love my dog).

      With that being said – waking up and enjoying what you do is the key to happiness. I don’t think you should completely separate work and life – the two don’t have to be exclusive, but to reject LIFE in favor of work? Well, that’s just nuts!

      Reply
  7. You absolutely can still be happy without loving your job. Or even liking it.

    BUT, there is nothing wrong with loving your job. You can love it. I love mine. The thing about love is that it has no limits. Just because you love your job doesn’t mean that it has to take away from your love for your wife. Those are two different types of love.

    Perhaps I don’t understand what’s wrong with being defined as a hardworker who serves people in this world. Not everyone will be a husband, not everyone will be a father. Let’s remember that we all have different roads.

    Reply
  8. You absolutely can still be happy without loving your job. Or even liking it.

    BUT, there is nothing wrong with loving your job. You can love it. I love mine. The thing about love is that it has no limits. Just because you love your job doesn’t mean that it has to take away from your love for your wife. Those are two different types of love.

    Perhaps I don’t understand what’s wrong with being defined as a hardworker who serves people in this world. Not everyone will be a husband, not everyone will be a father. Let’s remember that we all have different roads.

    Reply
  9. I think the idea of ‘loving’ your job is somewhat misleading. I attribute love to a person, something with emotion and feeling. A job certainly isn’t that. I think you shouldn’t loathe your job, but outside of that it’s just a means to an end. I tolerate my current job, and I enjoy the freelance work I do, but I LOVE my wife, son, and family. Different worlds.

    Reply
  10. I think the idea of ‘loving’ your job is somewhat misleading. I attribute love to a person, something with emotion and feeling. A job certainly isn’t that. I think you shouldn’t loathe your job, but outside of that it’s just a means to an end. I tolerate my current job, and I enjoy the freelance work I do, but I LOVE my wife, son, and family. Different worlds.

    Reply
  11. I was JUST talking about this with a friend who is job searching and coming up with no luck. He mentioned to me that he DOESN’T want a job he isn’t happy at and won’t settle. I looked at him and clucked my tongue, “You Gen Yer, you.” I understand that, I feel the same way, but sometimes it’s just the beginning and experience is important.

    I say, “Wouldn’t you rather HAVE a job, where you can learn what you like (or don’t like), get experience but then also leave work and enjoy your life outside of work. Be in a cool city, hang out with your friends, etc.” Your life is more than your work. We’re going to have many jobs, no need to be in love with this one here and now. It is a strong word and this Matt, is a very good post and argument. I will probably be piggybacking on it as I just had this conversation with my friend last night.

    Reply
    • I completely agree with your viewpoint here. To think that you are going to love every job you’ll ever have is, in a word, naive. But, to think every job is an opportunity to learn and grow, to gain experience, and to, as you said, learn what you like (and don’t like) – that is entirely conceivable and is the attitude that all of us should have.

      I’ve said before that “settling is for suckers” – and I think it is, to an extent. If you’re settling into a situation that isn’t helping you grow, then you are a sucker. You should never become content for the sake of being content. Keep learning and moving until you find something that you can be happy with, that you are passionate about and committed to. When work is an enjoyable part of your life, you’re able to love those other parts of living that much more.

      Piggyback all you want Grace – I would love to hear more thoughts on this topic. It’s one of those conversations that “needs to be had”.

      Reply
  12. I was JUST talking about this with a friend who is job searching and coming up with no luck. He mentioned to me that he DOESN’T want a job he isn’t happy at and won’t settle. I looked at him and clucked my tongue, “You Gen Yer, you.” I understand that, I feel the same way, but sometimes it’s just the beginning and experience is important.

    I say, “Wouldn’t you rather HAVE a job, where you can learn what you like (or don’t like), get experience but then also leave work and enjoy your life outside of work. Be in a cool city, hang out with your friends, etc.” Your life is more than your work. We’re going to have many jobs, no need to be in love with this one here and now. It is a strong word and this Matt, is a very good post and argument. I will probably be piggybacking on it as I just had this conversation with my friend last night.

    Reply
    • I completely agree with your viewpoint here. To think that you are going to love every job you’ll ever have is, in a word, naive. But, to think every job is an opportunity to learn and grow, to gain experience, and to, as you said, learn what you like (and don’t like) – that is entirely conceivable and is the attitude that all of us should have.

      I’ve said before that “settling is for suckers” – and I think it is, to an extent. If you’re settling into a situation that isn’t helping you grow, then you are a sucker. You should never become content for the sake of being content. Keep learning and moving until you find something that you can be happy with, that you are passionate about and committed to. When work is an enjoyable part of your life, you’re able to love those other parts of living that much more.

      Piggyback all you want Grace – I would love to hear more thoughts on this topic. It’s one of those conversations that “needs to be had”.

      Reply
  13. Matt: I agree that we don’t necessarily need to love our job to be happy. There does seem to be this great movement towards Gen Y entrepreneurship, and the general feeling that we shouldn’t settle. But, we’re young, and many of us don’t know what we want to do the rest of our lives yet, and that’s okay. The other thing is that many of us graduated in the middle of a recession, and that changes the game completely. How many of us are doing something we never thought we’d be doing? Journalism major working in marketing at an online ad network, yeah that’s me. So, loving our jobs might be an unrealistic goal right now. But, that doesn’t mean we should do something we hate either.

    I also agree with your hesitation in using the word “love” to describe a job.I think a better term is passionate. If you truly believe in what you’re doing, and really want to see it succeed, chances are that you’ll not only do a better job, but be a generally happier person too. I think finding a job that we’re passionate about is definitely a great goal to have, but we have to be realistic about the time table. Great post, love the discussion!

    Reply
    • I agree with you here Sam – and to expand, I think doing some things you never thought you would be doing is not only a sign of the economic times, but it also shows our willingness to adapt to what live throws at us. I NEVER expected to be working for a Pediatric Therapy office in Chicago – and when I tell people I usually get a blank stare, but I absolutely love it. It’s giving me the opportunity to really become the “expert” amongst my team and do what I do, learning so much along the way. I’m getting the hands on experience from ground zero that I would never receive at a mega-agency.

      Keeping an open mind, whether, wherever in life you may be, will get you far.

      Reply
  14. Matt: I agree that we don’t necessarily need to love our job to be happy. There does seem to be this great movement towards Gen Y entrepreneurship, and the general feeling that we shouldn’t settle. But, we’re young, and many of us don’t know what we want to do the rest of our lives yet, and that’s okay. The other thing is that many of us graduated in the middle of a recession, and that changes the game completely. How many of us are doing something we never thought we’d be doing? Journalism major working in marketing at an online ad network, yeah that’s me. So, loving our jobs might be an unrealistic goal right now. But, that doesn’t mean we should do something we hate either.

    I also agree with your hesitation in using the word “love” to describe a job.I think a better term is passionate. If you truly believe in what you’re doing, and really want to see it succeed, chances are that you’ll not only do a better job, but be a generally happier person too. I think finding a job that we’re passionate about is definitely a great goal to have, but we have to be realistic about the time table. Great post, love the discussion!

    Reply
    • I agree with you here Sam – and to expand, I think doing some things you never thought you would be doing is not only a sign of the economic times, but it also shows our willingness to adapt to what live throws at us. I NEVER expected to be working for a Pediatric Therapy office in Chicago – and when I tell people I usually get a blank stare, but I absolutely love it. It’s giving me the opportunity to really become the “expert” amongst my team and do what I do, learning so much along the way. I’m getting the hands on experience from ground zero that I would never receive at a mega-agency.

      Keeping an open mind, whether, wherever in life you may be, will get you far.

      Reply
  15. @nashvilleben,

    “You absolutely can still be happy without loving your job. Or even liking it.”

    Perhaps you don’t have to love your job, but you do have to like it in order to be happy in your life. As Matt suggests, a job can be your life or be part of your life. Either way, it’s a contributing factor to your overall happiness. If you go to work and don’t like it, not only are you unhappy when you are working but you also dread work when you’re not working.

    Reply
    • perhaps, but that’s not necessarily always the case. that’s like saying you have to like everything about life in order to be happy.

      [many] ‘happy people’ are happy because they look at life optimisticly, not because they like every aspect of their lives.

      jobs are [usually] only temporary and as long as you have your mind set on that, you can get through a job you don’t like and still be happy at the same time.

      just my opinion based upon my life’s experiences.

      Reply
  16. @nashvilleben,

    “You absolutely can still be happy without loving your job. Or even liking it.”

    Perhaps you don’t have to love your job, but you do have to like it in order to be happy in your life. As Matt suggests, a job can be your life or be part of your life. Either way, it’s a contributing factor to your overall happiness. If you go to work and don’t like it, not only are you unhappy when you are working but you also dread work when you’re not working.

    Reply
    • perhaps, but that’s not necessarily always the case. that’s like saying you have to like everything about life in order to be happy.

      [many] ‘happy people’ are happy because they look at life optimisticly, not because they like every aspect of their lives.

      jobs are [usually] only temporary and as long as you have your mind set on that, you can get through a job you don’t like and still be happy at the same time.

      just my opinion based upon my life’s experiences.

      Reply
  17. I used to say of family (that you’re born into) that you’ll always have to love them, it doesn’t mean you’ll always have to like them. :)

    You can’t love your job because love is reciprocal. As eloquently stated in the cinematic masterpiece Fever Pitch: “You love the Red Sox, but have they ever loved you back?” Ok, that isn’t work or a job but you get the idea.

    I agree immensely with Sam on her substitution of the word “passion.” I DO believe that you have to be passionate about the work you are doing. For the majority of time we spend in an office (if you are just going through the motions) or the amount of yourself you pour into work (if you believe in it a little more) or the sacrifices/scariness/thrills of starting your own business (if you believe a whole lot) you HAVE to be passionate about SOMETHING or else you are just unhappy for a big chunk of life.

    As you stated, life is about living. It’s far too short to spend so much of it someplace that you loathe.

    Reply
    • I love that point as well Elisa. “You can’t love a job because love is reciprocal” – I couldn’t have said it better myself. Unlike people you love, jobs are always replaceable (and I’m sure your employer feels the same about you. If you’re not replaceable, you’re not promotable – another conversation for another time, perhaps? :)

      Reply
      • I disagree that love is only love when it’s reciprocal.
        A boy loves a girl, but they break up because she doesn’t love him back.
        A parent loves a child before a child even knows what love is.
        God loves his people even if they don’t love him back.
        I love my job whether or not my employer wants to keep me or not.
        Being ‘in love’ is what’s reciprocal, but love itself is an action. A way of doing, not a way of being.

        Reply
        • I would look at those points a little differently.

          In the first there was a reciprocity, if not love. If there was no reciprocity, I’d argue he probably didn’t have love as much as infautation and adoration.
          In the last, comparing divine love with humanistic love is like comparing apples and oranges because they are both fruits.

          As for the child, there I would argue might be a legitimate argument against the reciprocity of love and instead the beauty of it. I think babies DO love their parents, even before they know fully what the action is. You see it in a child that will bawl hysterically and suddenly stop and smile and laugh and love when held in the arms of their parent. Yet at the same time I know very few parents who would ever NOT love their children, no matter what the child would do. Hrmm…it’s an interesting thought to ponder…

          Reply
          • I think you hit the nail on the head Elisa!! [Especially in regards to divine/humanistic love.]
            We are writing of very different kinds of love throughout. The English language falls short by only offering us one word to describe so much, don’t you think?

            Reply
  18. I used to say of family (that you’re born into) that you’ll always have to love them, it doesn’t mean you’ll always have to like them. :)

    You can’t love your job because love is reciprocal. As eloquently stated in the cinematic masterpiece Fever Pitch: “You love the Red Sox, but have they ever loved you back?” Ok, that isn’t work or a job but you get the idea.

    I agree immensely with Sam on her substitution of the word “passion.” I DO believe that you have to be passionate about the work you are doing. For the majority of time we spend in an office (if you are just going through the motions) or the amount of yourself you pour into work (if you believe in it a little more) or the sacrifices/scariness/thrills of starting your own business (if you believe a whole lot) you HAVE to be passionate about SOMETHING or else you are just unhappy for a big chunk of life.

    As you stated, life is about living. It’s far too short to spend so much of it someplace that you loathe.

    Reply
    • I love that point as well Elisa. “You can’t love a job because love is reciprocal” – I couldn’t have said it better myself. Unlike people you love, jobs are always replaceable (and I’m sure your employer feels the same about you. If you’re not replaceable, you’re not promotable – another conversation for another time, perhaps? :)

      Reply
      • I disagree that love is only love when it’s reciprocal.
        A boy loves a girl, but they break up because she doesn’t love him back.
        A parent loves a child before a child even knows what love is.
        God loves his people even if they don’t love him back.
        I love my job whether or not my employer wants to keep me or not.
        Being ‘in love’ is what’s reciprocal, but love itself is an action. A way of doing, not a way of being.

        Reply
        • I would look at those points a little differently.

          In the first there was a reciprocity, if not love. If there was no reciprocity, I’d argue he probably didn’t have love as much as infautation and adoration.
          In the last, comparing divine love with humanistic love is like comparing apples and oranges because they are both fruits.

          As for the child, there I would argue might be a legitimate argument against the reciprocity of love and instead the beauty of it. I think babies DO love their parents, even before they know fully what the action is. You see it in a child that will bawl hysterically and suddenly stop and smile and laugh and love when held in the arms of their parent. Yet at the same time I know very few parents who would ever NOT love their children, no matter what the child would do. Hrmm…it’s an interesting thought to ponder…

          Reply
          • I think you hit the nail on the head Elisa!! [Especially in regards to divine/humanistic love.]
            We are writing of very different kinds of love throughout. The English language falls short by only offering us one word to describe so much, don’t you think?

            Reply
  19. I used to say I “loved” my job until I gave birth to my son and I discovered what the word can truly mean. Now, although I feel fulfilled by and greatly enjoy my job, it is not the same “love” that I know is possible…for me. That said, the word will mean something different for everyone depending on personality, age, & experience. Life is certainly too short to waste it being miserable 9-12 hours per day at any job or in any relationship.

    Reply
  20. I used to say I “loved” my job until I gave birth to my son and I discovered what the word can truly mean. Now, although I feel fulfilled by and greatly enjoy my job, it is not the same “love” that I know is possible…for me. That said, the word will mean something different for everyone depending on personality, age, & experience. Life is certainly too short to waste it being miserable 9-12 hours per day at any job or in any relationship.

    Reply
  21. I really appreciate this post, Matt, because I hear from so many of my friends who have seemingly wonderful jobs that they are actually miserable, unfulfilled and questioning their lives. I think it is absolutely essential to be passionate about what you do, and perhaps love isn’t the most appropriate term but you nailed it right on the head when you said that nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else.

    Thank you for this one!

    Reply
    • No problem Lindsey. I think a lot of us trick ourselves into thinking that we love, or at least like a job that we actually can’t stand. The mind has a funny way of fooling itself – especially when we think we’re stuck and can’t do any better. If you can’t wake up in the morning and, for the most part, look forward to your daily grind, then you’re probably doing something wrong. Your job, like everything else, will have it’s good days and bad – but when the bad starts to outweigh the good – it’s time to start making some changes.

      Reply
  22. I really appreciate this post, Matt, because I hear from so many of my friends who have seemingly wonderful jobs that they are actually miserable, unfulfilled and questioning their lives. I think it is absolutely essential to be passionate about what you do, and perhaps love isn’t the most appropriate term but you nailed it right on the head when you said that nothing is work unless you’d rather be doing something else.

    Thank you for this one!

    Reply
    • No problem Lindsey. I think a lot of us trick ourselves into thinking that we love, or at least like a job that we actually can’t stand. The mind has a funny way of fooling itself – especially when we think we’re stuck and can’t do any better. If you can’t wake up in the morning and, for the most part, look forward to your daily grind, then you’re probably doing something wrong. Your job, like everything else, will have it’s good days and bad – but when the bad starts to outweigh the good – it’s time to start making some changes.

      Reply
  23. No matter how much (most) people love their job, there are many times that they’d rather not be working. Would rather be out on a sail boat, hiking, fishing, playing catch with their kids, or watching a game on TV. LIfe is not about work. Unfortunately, many positive experiences in life need some level of financial backing, this is where work comes into play.

    Work in my opinion has three levels of satisfaction:

    First Level – Extreme Employee Disengagement
    In this level someone absolutely hates their job. For whatever reason it causes so much stress that they bring that stress home with them. It saddens me when I hear of this because most people let work affect their outside activities, personal relationships, and overall stress and happiness level.

    Second Level – Normal Engagement
    Employees may not love their job, have the most passion, but they do their job and have no problem working hard. I see most people in this category. Maybe people go through up and down periods of satisfaction, but overall things are pretty good. They are able to enjoy outside activities with family and friends and overall work does not affect them much outside of being at work.

    Third Level – Extreme Employee Engagement
    Employees here have extreme passion, and commitment with work. If they don’t love what they do, then they feel taht hard work = success in life. While most of these people leave work without stress, many bring work home with them even when they really don’t have to. Doing so can sometimes affect relationships, and general life activities. Passion for this person = work.

    I think possibly the most successful people are a mix of level 2 and level 3. Knowing when to step back and enjoy life is critical to overall happiness. Also important is to realize when one must work extra hard, commit more time, and put some other things on hold for a bit. Anyone in level 1 needs to seriously look for another company, opportunity, or career path.

    Great post.

    Reply
    • Great thoughts here Rich (I’m pretty sure you comandeered and epic post within a post) – I think you’re right on having a balance between two and three. You want a job that you can feel 100% committed to – something that you aren’t always approaching with one foot out the door toward something new. But you also have to no when to break away and live your life from time to time. It’s not healthy to let work RUN your life – it should be a part of it, a successful and thriving part of it, but not IT. Well said here Rich.

      Reply
  24. No matter how much (most) people love their job, there are many times that they’d rather not be working. Would rather be out on a sail boat, hiking, fishing, playing catch with their kids, or watching a game on TV. LIfe is not about work. Unfortunately, many positive experiences in life need some level of financial backing, this is where work comes into play.

    Work in my opinion has three levels of satisfaction:

    First Level – Extreme Employee Disengagement
    In this level someone absolutely hates their job. For whatever reason it causes so much stress that they bring that stress home with them. It saddens me when I hear of this because most people let work affect their outside activities, personal relationships, and overall stress and happiness level.

    Second Level – Normal Engagement
    Employees may not love their job, have the most passion, but they do their job and have no problem working hard. I see most people in this category. Maybe people go through up and down periods of satisfaction, but overall things are pretty good. They are able to enjoy outside activities with family and friends and overall work does not affect them much outside of being at work.

    Third Level – Extreme Employee Engagement
    Employees here have extreme passion, and commitment with work. If they don’t love what they do, then they feel taht hard work = success in life. While most of these people leave work without stress, many bring work home with them even when they really don’t have to. Doing so can sometimes affect relationships, and general life activities. Passion for this person = work.

    I think possibly the most successful people are a mix of level 2 and level 3. Knowing when to step back and enjoy life is critical to overall happiness. Also important is to realize when one must work extra hard, commit more time, and put some other things on hold for a bit. Anyone in level 1 needs to seriously look for another company, opportunity, or career path.

    Great post.

    Reply
    • Great thoughts here Rich (I’m pretty sure you comandeered and epic post within a post) – I think you’re right on having a balance between two and three. You want a job that you can feel 100% committed to – something that you aren’t always approaching with one foot out the door toward something new. But you also have to no when to break away and live your life from time to time. It’s not healthy to let work RUN your life – it should be a part of it, a successful and thriving part of it, but not IT. Well said here Rich.

      Reply
  25. Hey Matt, great article!

    I’m currently working towards starting my own online business and getting myself out there. To be honest, this process really sucks. It seems like I can put in a ton of hours in writing blog posts, stumbling, tweeting, etc. but it’ll only put a small dent in my progress. But still, working towards a greater good is something I like doing. Hopefully in a couple of years, I’ll be able to see the fruits of my labor, instead of busying myself looking at fluctuating subscriber numbers and writing content few people ever see.

    Reply
    • John – seriously man, just keep doing it. I know it seems like the wheels may be spinning round and round while you’re sitting in neutral. But all of the things you are doing WILL PAY OFF if you remain committed. It won’t happen overnight – but use me as a case study. I started this back in February and already, it has become such an incredible, thriving, interactive community. I still have a LONG way to go and I still hustle every day at making this community better and better, but it’s all through hard work. AND, even more importantly, it’s led to some amazing opportunities from a business-perspective. Don’t give up and don’t give in. Keep moving forward and you’ll get there!

      Reply
  26. Hey Matt, great article!

    I’m currently working towards starting my own online business and getting myself out there. To be honest, this process really sucks. It seems like I can put in a ton of hours in writing blog posts, stumbling, tweeting, etc. but it’ll only put a small dent in my progress. But still, working towards a greater good is something I like doing. Hopefully in a couple of years, I’ll be able to see the fruits of my labor, instead of busying myself looking at fluctuating subscriber numbers and writing content few people ever see.

    Reply
    • John – seriously man, just keep doing it. I know it seems like the wheels may be spinning round and round while you’re sitting in neutral. But all of the things you are doing WILL PAY OFF if you remain committed. It won’t happen overnight – but use me as a case study. I started this back in February and already, it has become such an incredible, thriving, interactive community. I still have a LONG way to go and I still hustle every day at making this community better and better, but it’s all through hard work. AND, even more importantly, it’s led to some amazing opportunities from a business-perspective. Don’t give up and don’t give in. Keep moving forward and you’ll get there!

      Reply
  27. Hi Matt,

    I understand what you are saying about reserving “love” for the really important things but I am of the mindset that life and work can be intertwined to the point that there is barely a distinction. In other words, I think it’s possible for your “work” to also be a pleasurable part of your life. And it follows that if you love your life, you could also love your work…

    Paul

    Reply
    • I see what you’re saying – believe me – I do, and maybe (most likely) some of my perspective is based on my lack of work experience as a 23 year old – but while I do think work and life can and should go hand in hand – I do still see a job, any job, in a different light than my other relationships as an individual. Maybe you can “luv” (L-U-V) your job and “LOVE” other things. I think you still have to be able leave work and allow yourself to be free of your career responsibilities from time to time.

      Reply
  28. Hi Matt,

    I understand what you are saying about reserving “love” for the really important things but I am of the mindset that life and work can be intertwined to the point that there is barely a distinction. In other words, I think it’s possible for your “work” to also be a pleasurable part of your life. And it follows that if you love your life, you could also love your work…

    Paul

    Reply
    • I see what you’re saying – believe me – I do, and maybe (most likely) some of my perspective is based on my lack of work experience as a 23 year old – but while I do think work and life can and should go hand in hand – I do still see a job, any job, in a different light than my other relationships as an individual. Maybe you can “luv” (L-U-V) your job and “LOVE” other things. I think you still have to be able leave work and allow yourself to be free of your career responsibilities from time to time.

      Reply
  29. I like the little discussions this thread has created. Lots of ideas and perspectives floating about.

    I think love is a strong word to use, especially if you’re putting loving your wife and your kids on the same level of means as when you say you love your job. But I know people that would say they love their job (myself included) and although the heavy word of love is tossed in there, I think the context can put it on a lighter level.

    The actual “love” you have for your jobI think has to do with if you’re happy at your job at a given time. If you feel you’re growing, like you mentioned, even if you know you might not be at this job you “love” forever, it’s still the right fit for you at that point. On hot days I love ice-cream. In winter, not so much.
    If you feel like you’re growing, not just spinning your wheels, and feel like you’re doing good work or making progress on a professional or personal front, then I think you’ve got the right to throw the L-word down without hesitation.

    Reply
  30. “Love your spouse, love your kids, love your dog; A job? That doesn’t require love. It requires commitment, dedication, hard work, maybe even passion – but not love.”

    I’ve never thought of it that way. I was one to say “oh you have to love your job”. Now it hit me, you are right all the way. I need to show this to my boss and see what he has to say about it. :) This is a great post. Man you ROCKt!

    Reply
    • Thanks Cheila! I would LOVE for you to show this to your boss – and if you actually do – you are required to report his response back to us! I’d be interested to say what someone in more of a managerial role would have to say about this.

      Reply
  31. I like the little discussions this thread has created. Lots of ideas and perspectives floating about.

    I think love is a strong word to use, especially if you’re putting loving your wife and your kids on the same level of means as when you say you love your job. But I know people that would say they love their job (myself included) and although the heavy word of love is tossed in there, I think the context can put it on a lighter level.

    The actual “love” you have for your jobI think has to do with if you’re happy at your job at a given time. If you feel you’re growing, like you mentioned, even if you know you might not be at this job you “love” forever, it’s still the right fit for you at that point. On hot days I love ice-cream. In winter, not so much.
    If you feel like you’re growing, not just spinning your wheels, and feel like you’re doing good work or making progress on a professional or personal front, then I think you’ve got the right to throw the L-word down without hesitation.

    Reply
  32. “Love your spouse, love your kids, love your dog; A job? That doesn’t require love. It requires commitment, dedication, hard work, maybe even passion – but not love.”

    I’ve never thought of it that way. I was one to say “oh you have to love your job”. Now it hit me, you are right all the way. I need to show this to my boss and see what he has to say about it. :) This is a great post. Man you ROCKt!

    Reply
    • Thanks Cheila! I would LOVE for you to show this to your boss – and if you actually do – you are required to report his response back to us! I’d be interested to say what someone in more of a managerial role would have to say about this.

      Reply
  33. I’ll admit: I didn’t take the time to read the above commentary. Sorry, info overload :P. But if you don’t mind, I’ll drop my 2 cents and be on my way.
    Love is effervescent. Not heavy. Not demanding. Not controlling. So why not love whatever it is you’re doing, whatever it is you’re being, whoever it is you’re with at the moment of that doing/being/togetherness? Then there’s no need to compartmentalize life-to say, I love my job, or I love my kids. Of course you do. It’s inherent.

    I like everything in my life to flow together, to be one. Love speaks of compassion, of unity, of growth. If all I do savors strongly of love, there are no worries of specifying what I’m known as in life, or what my roles are. As I lovingly desire to propitiate love, it shows in my passion, my attitude, my respect, my commitment, and overall in my choices. In closing, I don’t have to save the term “love” for anything in particular, because it’s already apart of everything I do. Hope that makes some sense :)

    Reply
  34. I’ll admit: I didn’t take the time to read the above commentary. Sorry, info overload :P. But if you don’t mind, I’ll drop my 2 cents and be on my way.
    Love is effervescent. Not heavy. Not demanding. Not controlling. So why not love whatever it is you’re doing, whatever it is you’re being, whoever it is you’re with at the moment of that doing/being/togetherness? Then there’s no need to compartmentalize life-to say, I love my job, or I love my kids. Of course you do. It’s inherent.

    I like everything in my life to flow together, to be one. Love speaks of compassion, of unity, of growth. If all I do savors strongly of love, there are no worries of specifying what I’m known as in life, or what my roles are. As I lovingly desire to propitiate love, it shows in my passion, my attitude, my respect, my commitment, and overall in my choices. In closing, I don’t have to save the term “love” for anything in particular, because it’s already apart of everything I do. Hope that makes some sense :)

    Reply
  35. I like what I do at work – most days. I know I’m not changing the world. But I love my life, and I would never be defined by my career. My identity is not wrapped up in it, and I thik that’s a good thing.

    Reply
    • I agree – it seems like you’ve got your head on straight Paul. Knowing that your career and professional success isn’t what will ultimately define you is half the battle. Like you, most days, I like what I do very much, we all have our bad days, and there are other ways, outside of the nine to five, that we can spend our time striving to change the world!

      Reply
  36. I like what I do at work – most days. I know I’m not changing the world. But I love my life, and I would never be defined by my career. My identity is not wrapped up in it, and I thik that’s a good thing.

    Reply
    • I agree – it seems like you’ve got your head on straight Paul. Knowing that your career and professional success isn’t what will ultimately define you is half the battle. Like you, most days, I like what I do very much, we all have our bad days, and there are other ways, outside of the nine to five, that we can spend our time striving to change the world!

      Reply
  37. This is a great post, Matt! I think that as Gen-Y’ers (and I’m straddling the GenX/Y border) we feel a sense of entitlement in terms of work. Often, if we don’t love it, we feel we must move on. Like you said, we don’t want to settle. I think there are fantastic elements to this mindset–no one should “settle” for a job they hate–it’s forward thinking and proactive to feel the need to reach professional goals.

    However, the flip side to not settling is that if we don’t “feel” good about our jobs, we have the tendency to want to leave immediately. I will tell you something I’ve learned–life is not about always acting according to our “feelings.” They are fickle in work, and in our personal lives, and often there is learning involved even in the worst job situations.

    When I think of the luxury many of us have in terms of education, job opportunities, etc., I think the bottom line is that we need to be incredibly thankful for what we have. Many of our friends and family have been hit hard by the recession, and the economy is only now starting to bounce back. (And I won’t even get started on the way things go in developing nations, or during the industrial revolution.)

    Work is important to like, and to strive to be great at, but your priorities in terms of family, and personal life are dead on. Love those roles–the one’s that you’ll really be remembered for. Your kids won’t care if you had a “great” job. They’ll care whether you spent time with them.

    Reply
    • It’s a balance-beam Bryna – you want your kids to remember that you always spent time with them, but even after having kids, their are goals you still want to meet and exceed for your own personal growth. It doesn’t stop when you have a family (might be speaking out of turn as I am not there yet).

      While I don’t think you should ever settle, I also don’t think you should be grateful just to be grateful. Yes, there are so many out there who have it SO much worse than we do – real struggles that I will never have to face in my life – but we have the opportunity to do as much with our lives as we make for ourselves (something not everyone has the privilege of doing) – so if nothing else – we should be thankful of that, that we are the masters of our own career destiny.

      Great thoughts Bryna – thanks for sharing your insight!

      Reply
  38. This is a great post, Matt! I think that as Gen-Y’ers (and I’m straddling the GenX/Y border) we feel a sense of entitlement in terms of work. Often, if we don’t love it, we feel we must move on. Like you said, we don’t want to settle. I think there are fantastic elements to this mindset–no one should “settle” for a job they hate–it’s forward thinking and proactive to feel the need to reach professional goals.

    However, the flip side to not settling is that if we don’t “feel” good about our jobs, we have the tendency to want to leave immediately. I will tell you something I’ve learned–life is not about always acting according to our “feelings.” They are fickle in work, and in our personal lives, and often there is learning involved even in the worst job situations.

    When I think of the luxury many of us have in terms of education, job opportunities, etc., I think the bottom line is that we need to be incredibly thankful for what we have. Many of our friends and family have been hit hard by the recession, and the economy is only now starting to bounce back. (And I won’t even get started on the way things go in developing nations, or during the industrial revolution.)

    Work is important to like, and to strive to be great at, but your priorities in terms of family, and personal life are dead on. Love those roles–the one’s that you’ll really be remembered for. Your kids won’t care if you had a “great” job. They’ll care whether you spent time with them.

    Reply
    • It’s a balance-beam Bryna – you want your kids to remember that you always spent time with them, but even after having kids, their are goals you still want to meet and exceed for your own personal growth. It doesn’t stop when you have a family (might be speaking out of turn as I am not there yet).

      While I don’t think you should ever settle, I also don’t think you should be grateful just to be grateful. Yes, there are so many out there who have it SO much worse than we do – real struggles that I will never have to face in my life – but we have the opportunity to do as much with our lives as we make for ourselves (something not everyone has the privilege of doing) – so if nothing else – we should be thankful of that, that we are the masters of our own career destiny.

      Great thoughts Bryna – thanks for sharing your insight!

      Reply
  39. I think this is a great post and something that isn’t discussed nearly enough. I think some of us tend to place too much emphasis on finding/keeping the “perfect” job. In my experience, this adds unnecessary pressure to an already stressful time. I think the best thing we can do is slow down, relax, and let it work itself out. Without that self imposed added pressure of finding the “perfect” job, we are able to see more clearly and really figure it out over time. We need to continue learning and moving forward, like Matt says, but I think we also need to have a little patience.

    Reply
    • YES! Spot on Michelle – sometimes we just need to RELAX and realize that virtually nothing is going to perfect 100% of the time. At any job, even the ones you “love” – there are going to be stressful/bad days, ups and downs, bumps in the road. Embrace that diversity and you’ll be well on your way in the pursuit of happiness!

      Reply
  40. I think this is a great post and something that isn’t discussed nearly enough. I think some of us tend to place too much emphasis on finding/keeping the “perfect” job. In my experience, this adds unnecessary pressure to an already stressful time. I think the best thing we can do is slow down, relax, and let it work itself out. Without that self imposed added pressure of finding the “perfect” job, we are able to see more clearly and really figure it out over time. We need to continue learning and moving forward, like Matt says, but I think we also need to have a little patience.

    Reply
    • YES! Spot on Michelle – sometimes we just need to RELAX and realize that virtually nothing is going to perfect 100% of the time. At any job, even the ones you “love” – there are going to be stressful/bad days, ups and downs, bumps in the road. Embrace that diversity and you’ll be well on your way in the pursuit of happiness!

      Reply
  41. None of us want to be “that person” that always complains about his or her job. The truth is I think almost everyone will be frustrated or complain about their job at some point. I DO want to love my job, but I don’t always have to LIKE it. This is an important point to keep in mind.

    Reply
    • GREAT point Cassie – You want to love your job, but on a day-to-day basis, you’re not always going to like it – a job is still going to be “just a job” from time to time. Thanks for sharing your perspective here – good stuff!

      Reply
    • I couldn’t agree with you more, Cassie. I’ve been teaching (and part of the administration of a school) for the past 15 years of my life (Right out of College, no wait, in fact it was during my last term!) and although I understand you point, I must say that in my chosen profession it does require love (and luckily it it reciprocated!) to be able to understand your students better and have an appreciation of what they are doing. Without it I don’t think I would’ve been able to withstand all the pressure and trials that have come my way.

      Don’t get me wrong. I’ve reached the point wherein I want to find the right people to pass on my work to because I am starting to feel tired of it all but then just when you’re thinking that, a student would come along and smile at you or hug you…Just like how your babies erase all of the weariness when you hug them, knowing that you are doing something that impacts the lives of hundreds of children is inspiration enough and motivates you to keep on working.

      If you love what you do, then you shouldn’t have too much to complain about. In my experience, teachers who are not passionate about teaching will not be able to stand the demands of the job without complaining about it. They usually stay for 3 years, doing nothing but complain for the last year. Those who love teaching get to stay 5 years or longer and these are the ones who are willing to overlook some of the problems because they believe these are insignificant compared to the bigger picture…being able to affect lives.

      I guess working without loving your job is possible but then it’s just work, you’re just doing your job. Teaching requires love, patience, understanding and appreciation..just like any relationship and it also needs a nurturing heart. Teaching is a calling…

      Reply
      • Beautifully written Vivian – and you’ll get no argument from me. I think this goes perfectly with the idea of LOVING your job even when you may not necessarily LIKE it. Teaching is a skill, an art, a passion. It’s something I am interested in myself (on some level) in my future. Being able to have a positive impact on so many others has to be extremely rewarding. I have the utmost respect and admiration for what you do.

        I have the pleasure of working in the healthcare industry as we speak (Pediatric Therapy) and while I do not work directly with children, it’s very rewarding to be a part of an organization who is committed to helping children and restoring happiness to families. Thank you for coming by to share your perspective Vivan!

        Reply
  42. None of us want to be “that person” that always complains about his or her job. The truth is I think almost everyone will be frustrated or complain about their job at some point. I DO want to love my job, but I don’t always have to LIKE it. This is an important point to keep in mind.

    Reply
    • GREAT point Cassie – You want to love your job, but on a day-to-day basis, you’re not always going to like it – a job is still going to be “just a job” from time to time. Thanks for sharing your perspective here – good stuff!

      Reply
    • I couldn’t agree with you more, Cassie. I’ve been teaching (and part of the administration of a school) for the past 15 years of my life (Right out of College, no wait, in fact it was during my last term!) and although I understand you point, I must say that in my chosen profession it does require love (and luckily it it reciprocated!) to be able to understand your students better and have an appreciation of what they are doing. Without it I don’t think I would’ve been able to withstand all the pressure and trials that have come my way.

      Don’t get me wrong. I’ve reached the point wherein I want to find the right people to pass on my work to because I am starting to feel tired of it all but then just when you’re thinking that, a student would come along and smile at you or hug you…Just like how your babies erase all of the weariness when you hug them, knowing that you are doing something that impacts the lives of hundreds of children is inspiration enough and motivates you to keep on working.

      If you love what you do, then you shouldn’t have too much to complain about. In my experience, teachers who are not passionate about teaching will not be able to stand the demands of the job without complaining about it. They usually stay for 3 years, doing nothing but complain for the last year. Those who love teaching get to stay 5 years or longer and these are the ones who are willing to overlook some of the problems because they believe these are insignificant compared to the bigger picture…being able to affect lives.

      I guess working without loving your job is possible but then it’s just work, you’re just doing your job. Teaching requires love, patience, understanding and appreciation..just like any relationship and it also needs a nurturing heart. Teaching is a calling…

      Reply
      • Beautifully written Vivian – and you’ll get no argument from me. I think this goes perfectly with the idea of LOVING your job even when you may not necessarily LIKE it. Teaching is a skill, an art, a passion. It’s something I am interested in myself (on some level) in my future. Being able to have a positive impact on so many others has to be extremely rewarding. I have the utmost respect and admiration for what you do.

        I have the pleasure of working in the healthcare industry as we speak (Pediatric Therapy) and while I do not work directly with children, it’s very rewarding to be a part of an organization who is committed to helping children and restoring happiness to families. Thank you for coming by to share your perspective Vivan!

        Reply
  43. I’ve had this epiphany for myself a couple of years ago, but the feeling of not progressing fast enough always catches up to me. It’s nice to be reminded of this by our network of bloggers every once in a while =) Thanks Matt.

    Reply
    • I’m probably about as impatient as they come – I have to really force myself to take a step back, then take another one, and realize that each step, each job – both good and bad – is leading to something – but that nothing, ever, is going to be perfect 100% of the time. As Cassie said above, you can love your job, but you’re not always going to LIKE it. Roll with the punches, have a little faith, and take things one step at a time (with the occasional giant leap for mankind).

      Reply
  44. I’ve had this epiphany for myself a couple of years ago, but the feeling of not progressing fast enough always catches up to me. It’s nice to be reminded of this by our network of bloggers every once in a while =) Thanks Matt.

    Reply
    • I’m probably about as impatient as they come – I have to really force myself to take a step back, then take another one, and realize that each step, each job – both good and bad – is leading to something – but that nothing, ever, is going to be perfect 100% of the time. As Cassie said above, you can love your job, but you’re not always going to LIKE it. Roll with the punches, have a little faith, and take things one step at a time (with the occasional giant leap for mankind).

      Reply
  45. Great post, Matt!

    I recently received some great advice on this subject that I’d like to share: “You need to think of it [your job & life in general] in terms of joy. What you’re doing may not always make you happy, but it should always bring you joy.”

    Thanks,

    Tom O’Keefe
    @TomOKeefe1

    Reply
  46. Great post, Matt!

    I recently received some great advice on this subject that I’d like to share: “You need to think of it [your job & life in general] in terms of joy. What you’re doing may not always make you happy, but it should always bring you joy.”

    Thanks,

    Tom O’Keefe
    @TomOKeefe1

    Reply
  47. Our personal definitions of success for own lives is the very fiber of our personal identity, self esteem, happiness and motivation in life. I learned a long time ago that my self imposed measures of success were either milestones and markers on the upward path of life, or could work just the opposite and be the albatross or Millstone around my own neck.

    Having a realistic professional definition of success is important. Career goals and plans are very nessasary, but we are not just made of “WHAT” we do. It may sound silly but if “all” you are to yourself is “WHAT” you do, your professional accomplishments, who are you, when you are doing nothing?

    I think as most people mature we are prominently driven by “WHO” we feel we are, or are becoming. Moral values, spirituality, being happy, become more “important”. Personal success is about happiness and fulfillment in life. Not what you “do” for a living, not how big your house is, not what kind of car you drive, not what neighborhood you live in. As you get older you learn the importance of feeding your personal goals as primary in life. Nurturing your own soul, not just your pocket book or wallet.

    For those of you who are just starting out in the workforce, my best recommendation is to find that thing in life that you can “DO” that not only feeds your wallet, but also feeds your soul, find that thing which makes you happy and accomplished by your own measure of personal success, and do it on purpose!

    Reply
    • Wise words Kevin – thanks for coming by and sharing. The main takeaway here is that money is not and will not ever be the end-all-be-all for me. I would MUCH rather do something for less money and be more personally fulfilled. There isn’t a goal in my head that says I have to make six figures to be happy – I’d like to live comfortably – but wealth will never trump personal happiness.

      Reply
  48. Our personal definitions of success for own lives is the very fiber of our personal identity, self esteem, happiness and motivation in life. I learned a long time ago that my self imposed measures of success were either milestones and markers on the upward path of life, or could work just the opposite and be the albatross or Millstone around my own neck.

    Having a realistic professional definition of success is important. Career goals and plans are very nessasary, but we are not just made of “WHAT” we do. It may sound silly but if “all” you are to yourself is “WHAT” you do, your professional accomplishments, who are you, when you are doing nothing?

    I think as most people mature we are prominently driven by “WHO” we feel we are, or are becoming. Moral values, spirituality, being happy, become more “important”. Personal success is about happiness and fulfillment in life. Not what you “do” for a living, not how big your house is, not what kind of car you drive, not what neighborhood you live in. As you get older you learn the importance of feeding your personal goals as primary in life. Nurturing your own soul, not just your pocket book or wallet.

    For those of you who are just starting out in the workforce, my best recommendation is to find that thing in life that you can “DO” that not only feeds your wallet, but also feeds your soul, find that thing which makes you happy and accomplished by your own measure of personal success, and do it on purpose!

    Reply
    • Wise words Kevin – thanks for coming by and sharing. The main takeaway here is that money is not and will not ever be the end-all-be-all for me. I would MUCH rather do something for less money and be more personally fulfilled. There isn’t a goal in my head that says I have to make six figures to be happy – I’d like to live comfortably – but wealth will never trump personal happiness.

      Reply
  49. I don't think it's necessary to love your job. I do how ever think it's vital to have passion for it otherwise what's the point of doing it? We only get one life. why would we want to spend the majority of it a job that we don't have passion for. I honestly think that no one should actually love their job. There was a comment early on that love should be exclusive for family and friends, the people in your life and I couldn't agree more. A job isn't something that will love you back and most American corporations care more about the company than the people who run it. Which that in in itself boggles my mind since it's the people who run the company… But that's a whole different topic…

    Have passion for your job because you have to do it everyday.
    Love you family and friends, they are what matters most.

    And that's my opinion, which really, means nothing :)

    @jessicahannon

    Reply
  50. A lot of these emotions that tell us we need to LOVE our job has been enforced by American culture. I'm fortunate to have friends who live all over the world and the work/life balance is totally different there – so much so that they are REQUIRED to take their vacation time, and they get MUCH more of it than we do here in the states. We've been taught since a VERY early age that being professionally successful is the end all be all of living.

    So, at some point we have to make a decision, do we let work consume us, or do we, at the end of the day, understand and appreciate that it's “just a job”. I've gone down the path of the latter. I LOVE what I do, even when I don't like it every single day – and I'm extremely passionate about it – but it's a totally different kind of love. The REAL kind of love in our lives isn't a one way street – as you said – a job doesn't love you back – that kind of love has to be reserved for what really matters in life, your family and friends, the ones that will always be there.

    All of our opinions don't mean anything in the grand scheme of things, but I very much agree with your thoughts here. Thanks for coming by and sharing a few words :)

    Reply
  51. Well , the view of the passage is totally correct ,your details is really reasonable and you guy give us valuable informative post, I totally agree the standpoint of upstairs. I often surfing on this forum when I m free and I find there are so much good information we can learn in this forum! http://likeblackhulks.com/

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  52. “I’m not ready for the destination – I’m too young, too inexperienced, and interested in too many different things to settle down and focus on one.” I said something VERY similar to this the other day. It’s very refreshing to see that sentiment elsewhere. Just discovered your site recently and really enjoying digging through it! I’m inspired…

    Reply
  53. Hey Matt, Interesting perspective. It makes sense but need expansion. I’ve been on this planet for over 50 years and I’ve been an entrepreneur for most of them. The current downturn has hit me so hard that it is threatening to wipe out everything I have built up. I have fellow who works for me that leads a very simple life. He has several small sources of income that together give him diversity and safety. He’s often out kayaking or relaxing with a book by mid afternoon. He had some weaknesses in his game like lack of a retirement savings plan and emergency funds but I’ve helped him to remedy this. Out of all this I’ve developed an entirely new way of approaching life and I’m making changes. You can check it out if you like at http://www.EasyMoneyEasyLife.com. You’re absolutely right on one thing though. Money and business does not define you as a success. The people and experiences in your life do. nnThanks again MattnnArchien

    Reply
  54. Hurrah! After all I got a website from where I be able to really obtain useful data concerning my study
    and knowledge.

    Reply
  55. Great blog right here! Also your website so much up very fast!
    What web host are you the usage of? Can I get your affiliate hyperlink for your host?
    I want my website loaded up as fast as yours lol

    Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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Philosophy