in Philosophy

Searching for the meaning of life? Join the club.

Life is just a waking dream

6:30 am. Monday. May 17, 2008. I turn the alarm off after hitting snooze for the past half-hour. I ritualistically turn on the TV, tune to channel twenty-three. Saved by the Bell. I’ve seen this episode a million times but I sit up and watch it anyway. It’s the one where Zack dates the girl he meets through the ‘Teen Line’ who ends up being in a wheel chair. Zack, of course is a jerk about the whole wheelchair thing, but in the end he’s his charming self, gets the girl, roll credits.

Today is the first day of the rest of my life.

Life is good during this ‘morning-limbo’ – the period of time where I’m awake, but only in a physical sense. Mentally, I’m still dreaming, I’m still without responsibility. Then reality strikes. I climb out of bed and look around, I take a sip of water and look at my newly acquired college degree. I think back to my graduation on Saturday, reminiscing on how boring it was to sit through all those names being called. Then I think about the typical post-graduation family get-togethers – and being rewarded for finishing my college career with a nice little sum of money. I’d love to go buy a new XBOX game, but given my current financial situation, namely the debt I’ve incurred from my schooling, would prohibit that. In fact, I would likely never see a dime of those checks sitting on the dresser. I yawn and stretch, my mind shifts to today. I have to get up and go to my part-time job. Shit.

Seriously, this is my life?

I’m standing in the shower, water raining down,  and doubt consumes me. Up until now everything has been planned. I’ve followed the predetermined path that most of us do. We go to school with the intent of passing, moving onward through our academic career. We do good in high school (or at least try) so we can get into a good college. We do good in college so we can get a good job. And now, here I am, done with the prep-work, starting at the blank canvas that is my life.

What do I want to do with my life? What kind of job can I find? What do I even like doing? I’ve got a marketing degree – what will that get me? What did I even go to school for anyway? How am I going to survive on my own? Where will I be a year from now? Question after question goes flying through my head, and frustration is building because I can’t seem to come up with any answers.

______________________________________

Breathe, just breathe

We all go through this. These moments of doubt. Times in our lives when we lose track of who we are. We question our purpose and long to discover the meaning of (our) life. It’s the beautiful mess that is human existence. Maybe you recently graduated and are facing similar circumstances as I did only a year ago. Maybe you’re 40 years old, you’ve been in the workforce for years, established tenure with your company, but you find yourself just ‘going through the motions’ with no sense of purpose, wanting more for yourself but not knowing where to start. Maybe you have a family, kids, a mortgage, and you can’t afford to drop everything and say “To hell with it! I’m going to do what I want to do!

Whatever your situation is. Take a deep breath. It’s going to be OK. Your role in life doesn’t have to be clearly defined. Not now. Not ever.

You might be thinking, how can I, a 23 year old guy, be in any position to talk to you about life, self-doubt, and conquering the unknown? All I can say is that I’ve been there, I’m there every day, wondering what’s next, wondering where I want to go in life and how I’m going to get there. But here’s the thing, we all are. We’re all there, fighting the same struggle down in life’s trenches, storming the beaches of Normandy every single day, telling ourselves CARPE DIEM! but not even knowing what’s out there to be seized. We might have a plan, but we never really know where that will get us. We don’t know what’s next – and it’s scary, hell, it’s downright terrifying.

But there is light at the end of the dark unknown – you’ll find that light again and again. You’ll figure out the answers to your questions. I didn’t know what I wanted to do a year ago, and I still don’t. But I’m learning, I’m growing, I’m figuring out what I’m good at, what I like and don’t like. Little by little, I’m coming into my own. I’m becoming a more complete version of myself through each failure and obstacle. When I’m knocked down I get back up.

I realize that I’m not invincible.

Life’s a bitch. There are going to be those moments that downright suck. Something bad will happen, and when you think it can’t get any worse, it does. You are going to feel overwhelmed and vulnerable. Accept it. Understand that you’re not invincible. You’re not immune to hardships. They happen to the best of us, even when we don’t deserve it, life has a way of kicking us while we’re down. The response: get back up and kick life back even harder!

You don’t have to go at it alone. One of my most recent ‘revelations’ is in realizing that it is OK to reach out and lean on others from time to time. It’s not a sign of weakness to accept the graciousness of another. There are some amazing people in my life that are there for me, willing to be the hands that hold me up as I continue to ‘crowd-surf through life’.

So, you don’t know what you want to do? You’re unsure about your purpose? I’m here to tell you that it’s fine, you’ll get there, just keep moving. If we all knew the meaning of life, what would be the point in living it?

______________________________________

6:30 am. Monday. June 8, 2009. I turn the alarm off after hitting snooze for the past half-hour. I ritualistically turn on the TV, tune to channel twenty-three, Saved by the Bell – I’ve seen this episode a million times but I sit up and watch it anyway. It’s the one where Zack dates the girl he meets through the ‘Teen Line’ who ends up being in a wheel chair. Zack, of course is a jerk about the whole wheelchair thing, but in the end he’s his charming self, gets the girl, roll credits.

Today is the first day of the rest of my life…

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68 Comments

  1. Matt,

    I really enjoy your insights and you write well. And this post is no exception. I think you capture what many others are thinking and you give them a language to talk about it.

    I wanted to offer a few thoughts of my own. After all, I have had a few more decades to think about these questions!

    First, it is good to be asking the questions you are asking. And there will be times when it is absolutely essential to ask them. There is an event that traditional classical astrologers call “The Saturn Return” These are times in one’s life when the orbit of the planet Saturn returns to exactly the position it was in at the time of one’s birth. That happens at about age 29 and again sometime between the ages of 58 and 60. Those times are when we really want to ask “what do I want to do with my life”. And it is important that we develop our own answer – and not have someone else write our script.

    Second, as the lyrics from an old Beatles song said, “I’ll get by with a little help from my friends”. When we go through these identity quakes, it’s good to have friends.

    Third, there will be times when life is really tough. And we all get our turn at bat to deal with those times. At the end of 1999 my mother died, and then at the beginning of 2002 my wide passed away after a long illness – that period pretty much sucked. There were times that the best I could do was just get through the day. The good news is that we do get through these tough times and they can really deepen our understanding of life as we know it.

    You are already making a difference in the lives of the people with whom you have connected. Keep writing. Thanks.

    • John – thanks for coming by (as you said you would) and sharing some wisdom here – it’s good to have a mixed group of responders and not just a bunch of twenty-somethings running around questioning life when, in the grand scheme of things, we’re just starting to live it.

      There are those milestones where you’re forced to take a step back and say, ‘What now?’ – I’m going through that as we speak. As I wrote in the post, I’ve got a blank canvas laid out in front of me, I have the tools and instruments at my disposal to paint a masterpiece, but I’m not really sure where to begin, I don’t know where to lay the first stroke, so I’m sort of in that ‘about to take the plunge into the unknown’ phase – which I think a lot of us are. Coming out of college, facing a horrible economy, It’s clear that more and more people in my age group are being propelled into the unknown earlier in life, which is scary. We have something to fall back on, then all the sudden we’re on our own. It’s like throwing a kid into the deep end and making him learn to swim on his own. Not a bad thing, but downright terrifying to me, the little kid without his floaties on.

      We just have to keep moving – and not be afraid to lean on others who are willing to help. As Sam says below – accepting the graciousness of others is a sign of maturity and strength, not a display of weakness.

      We can all learn a lot from your story John – I look forward to getting to know each other better through continued dialogue here. Cheers!

  2. Matt,

    I really enjoy your insights and you write well. And this post is no exception. I think you capture what many others are thinking and you give them a language to talk about it.

    I wanted to offer a few thoughts of my own. After all, I have had a few more decades to think about these questions!

    First, it is good to be asking the questions you are asking. And there will be times when it is absolutely essential to ask them. There is an event that traditional classical astrologers call “The Saturn Return” These are times in one’s life when the orbit of the planet Saturn returns to exactly the position it was in at the time of one’s birth. That happens at about age 29 and again sometime between the ages of 58 and 60. Those times are when we really want to ask “what do I want to do with my life”. And it is important that we develop our own answer – and not have someone else write our script.

    Second, as the lyrics from an old Beatles song said, “I’ll get by with a little help from my friends”. When we go through these identity quakes, it’s good to have friends.

    Third, there will be times when life is really tough. And we all get our turn at bat to deal with those times. At the end of 1999 my mother died, and then at the beginning of 2002 my wide passed away after a long illness – that period pretty much sucked. There were times that the best I could do was just get through the day. The good news is that we do get through these tough times and they can really deepen our understanding of life as we know it.

    You are already making a difference in the lives of the people with whom you have connected. Keep writing. Thanks.

    • John – thanks for coming by (as you said you would) and sharing some wisdom here – it’s good to have a mixed group of responders and not just a bunch of twenty-somethings running around questioning life when, in the grand scheme of things, we’re just starting to live it.

      There are those milestones where you’re forced to take a step back and say, ‘What now?’ – I’m going through that as we speak. As I wrote in the post, I’ve got a blank canvas laid out in front of me, I have the tools and instruments at my disposal to paint a masterpiece, but I’m not really sure where to begin, I don’t know where to lay the first stroke, so I’m sort of in that ‘about to take the plunge into the unknown’ phase – which I think a lot of us are. Coming out of college, facing a horrible economy, It’s clear that more and more people in my age group are being propelled into the unknown earlier in life, which is scary. We have something to fall back on, then all the sudden we’re on our own. It’s like throwing a kid into the deep end and making him learn to swim on his own. Not a bad thing, but downright terrifying to me, the little kid without his floaties on.

      We just have to keep moving – and not be afraid to lean on others who are willing to help. As Sam says below – accepting the graciousness of others is a sign of maturity and strength, not a display of weakness.

      We can all learn a lot from your story John – I look forward to getting to know each other better through continued dialogue here. Cheers!

  3. Matt:

    Good to see yr post after such a long time. It’s been a great journey last month on CHANGE series and now here is another great post, which suits to every generation- Gen Y or Gen X (if there’s any!).

    We all go to a college to get a job later on. This is how we all have been brought up. It works for a few but not for others. Including me and others, we still don’t know what we are doing is really what we want to do. I always struggle with that and I ask hundreds of questions to myself. Sometimes I get answers but most of the time, path is still not clear. I always wonder what to do and few things I have analyzed are the same as you have written down here. It’s okay to just move on and find out your goals along with it. Slowly but surely, we all find out meaning of our lives and do what we really want to do.

    One thing I would like to add is no matter what you do, do it from your heart. Even if you don’t like your work, you can learn a thing or two about it. It’s always good to learn, even though it’s way out of your goal/dream. If you work as a pizza delivery guy/gal, you can learn how a small business works and how to improve it’s delivery model. If you work in a dollar store, you can learn to know how come they have amazing products in such a low rate. If you work in a dead-end office job, you can learn what NOT to do later on.

    No matter where you are or what you do, you can always learn something which will definitely help you to achieve your goals and fulfill your dreams.

    Life is a journey and you just have to move on.

    Cheers..
    Pritesh
    http://twitter.com/mehta1p

    • Pritesh –

      In case I haven’t said it before – I’m thrilled to have you as a ‘regular’ here. You’re always able to absorb and take in information while adding your own insight and follow up. Following your heart sounds so cliche but it’s almost always (if not always) the best practice.

      Second – learning through everything is so (so) important. I can’t stress enough that no matter how much your job sucks, no matter how dead-end you think your current path is – there is SOMETHING to be learned there (I wrote about this a while ago – check the post out here: http://www.lifewithoutpants.com/business/nobody-likes-a-quitter/). You’ll learn what you’re good at, what you’re not good at. How you tolerate monotonous work, good and bad ways to manage employees, etc. Even when I was working as a grocery bagger, I took something away and can say that I learned the value of communication and that one person, even the guy bagging your groceries, can have a lasting impact by providing added customer service (increases customer perception and value). One nice gesture can lead to repeat business – and it really doesn’t take a lot to impress someone by doing something unexpected.

      Great thoughts as always Pritesh – thanks as always for lending your voice to this discussion.

  4. Matt:

    Good to see yr post after such a long time. It’s been a great journey last month on CHANGE series and now here is another great post, which suits to every generation- Gen Y or Gen X (if there’s any!).

    We all go to a college to get a job later on. This is how we all have been brought up. It works for a few but not for others. Including me and others, we still don’t know what we are doing is really what we want to do. I always struggle with that and I ask hundreds of questions to myself. Sometimes I get answers but most of the time, path is still not clear. I always wonder what to do and few things I have analyzed are the same as you have written down here. It’s okay to just move on and find out your goals along with it. Slowly but surely, we all find out meaning of our lives and do what we really want to do.

    One thing I would like to add is no matter what you do, do it from your heart. Even if you don’t like your work, you can learn a thing or two about it. It’s always good to learn, even though it’s way out of your goal/dream. If you work as a pizza delivery guy/gal, you can learn how a small business works and how to improve it’s delivery model. If you work in a dollar store, you can learn to know how come they have amazing products in such a low rate. If you work in a dead-end office job, you can learn what NOT to do later on.

    No matter where you are or what you do, you can always learn something which will definitely help you to achieve your goals and fulfill your dreams.

    Life is a journey and you just have to move on.

    Cheers..
    Pritesh
    http://twitter.com/mehta1p

    • Pritesh –

      In case I haven’t said it before – I’m thrilled to have you as a ‘regular’ here. You’re always able to absorb and take in information while adding your own insight and follow up. Following your heart sounds so cliche but it’s almost always (if not always) the best practice.

      Second – learning through everything is so (so) important. I can’t stress enough that no matter how much your job sucks, no matter how dead-end you think your current path is – there is SOMETHING to be learned there (I wrote about this a while ago – check the post out here: http://www.lifewithoutpants.com/business/nobody-likes-a-quitter/). You’ll learn what you’re good at, what you’re not good at. How you tolerate monotonous work, good and bad ways to manage employees, etc. Even when I was working as a grocery bagger, I took something away and can say that I learned the value of communication and that one person, even the guy bagging your groceries, can have a lasting impact by providing added customer service (increases customer perception and value). One nice gesture can lead to repeat business – and it really doesn’t take a lot to impress someone by doing something unexpected.

      Great thoughts as always Pritesh – thanks as always for lending your voice to this discussion.

  5. Matt: First of all, I love that you watch Saved by the Bell in the morning! On a more serious note, thank you for sharing your perspective. I know you’ve been riding a roller coaster, especially recently, and I’m happy to see how much your outlook has changed. As I wrote about a few weeks ago, even when everything seems to be going wrong and you can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, it will get better. True, life may suck for a while, but you have to keep going. When you get knocked down, get back up and try again. What’s the alternative? Giving up? Not an option.

    I think one of the most important things you’ve realized is that you can’t go it alone. You’re right, it’s perfectly okay to ask for help and support from the people who care about you. “It’s not a sign of weakness to accept the graciousness of another,” in fact, it’s a sign of strength. Great post, Matt! Everything will be okay in the end, and if it’s not okay, it must not be the end.

    • A disclaimer of sorts: As un-optimistic as this post may have come across at first glance – I am actually in a very optimistic state-of-mind right now. There is a ton up in the air and I’m sitting here wondering ‘what’s next?’ But that isn’t to say I’m not excited about what the future will bring. I know there are speed bumps throughout our lives that are going to slow us down, sometimes almost to what feels like a complete stop. But we have to keep swimming against the current until eventually, the current is running with us.

      It’s those of us who can swim up shit’s creek without a paddle and live to tell the tale; the survivors, that become the leaders and the innovators of a generation. We’re the one’s that aren’t simply coasting through life – we’re dedicated to rising above the rest, and we’re OK with taking a step back if it means taking a giant leap in the right direction.

      As you said – the only other alternative is giving up – which is not an option. Accept that you’re not invincible and you’ll need some support, hold your head up, and keep moving. Thanks for sharing your wisdom Sam, always appreciated.

  6. Matt: First of all, I love that you watch Saved by the Bell in the morning! On a more serious note, thank you for sharing your perspective. I know you’ve been riding a roller coaster, especially recently, and I’m happy to see how much your outlook has changed. As I wrote about a few weeks ago, even when everything seems to be going wrong and you can’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, it will get better. True, life may suck for a while, but you have to keep going. When you get knocked down, get back up and try again. What’s the alternative? Giving up? Not an option.

    I think one of the most important things you’ve realized is that you can’t go it alone. You’re right, it’s perfectly okay to ask for help and support from the people who care about you. “It’s not a sign of weakness to accept the graciousness of another,” in fact, it’s a sign of strength. Great post, Matt! Everything will be okay in the end, and if it’s not okay, it must not be the end.

    • A disclaimer of sorts: As un-optimistic as this post may have come across at first glance – I am actually in a very optimistic state-of-mind right now. There is a ton up in the air and I’m sitting here wondering ‘what’s next?’ But that isn’t to say I’m not excited about what the future will bring. I know there are speed bumps throughout our lives that are going to slow us down, sometimes almost to what feels like a complete stop. But we have to keep swimming against the current until eventually, the current is running with us.

      It’s those of us who can swim up shit’s creek without a paddle and live to tell the tale; the survivors, that become the leaders and the innovators of a generation. We’re the one’s that aren’t simply coasting through life – we’re dedicated to rising above the rest, and we’re OK with taking a step back if it means taking a giant leap in the right direction.

      As you said – the only other alternative is giving up – which is not an option. Accept that you’re not invincible and you’ll need some support, hold your head up, and keep moving. Thanks for sharing your wisdom Sam, always appreciated.

  7. Questioning life… it seems that nowadays everybody is going through the same. Is good to know though, I really like reading your posts and to know other people´s points of views. When I started questioning my life (specifically this year), I thought that I was the problem, that I wasn’t being thankful for everything I had. But knowing that almost every single 20something year old is going through the same makes me feel a little better.

    I´m bored of being worried, of having high expectations about life, waiting for a job, or a phone call saying that I got that job that I want so bad. I admire people that one day they decide to go travel for a year around the world. This would be the perfect moment to do it, but I can´t seem to figure out how to get a large amount of money to do that. A whole year off, doing nothing but doing everything… hope I can soon.

    Also successful people in their 30´s that I know are questioning everything. Life goes to fast to spend all the time questioning everything. Some people say that you are not supposed to be worried about your future, and just enjoy the present. That´s what I´m trying to do every day, find joy in things that doesn’t make any sense right now. I think enjoying life is important; it might not be what we have dreamt about, but after all, if we keep trying and trying someday we will get what we deserve. As you said in your post “get back up and kick life back even harder!”… actually that might be the solution to everything.

    • Hola Ana! Thanks for coming by – hope you like what you see and I hope you’ll continue to come back from time to time. I love your writing over at ‘Something Good’.

      It really is good to know that we’re not alone in all this. My story might not be the most unique or the most exciting, but it’s something that almost everyone, if not all of us can relate to, regardless of where you are in life, you have questions, doubts, fears. The quest for the meaning of life is constantly ongoing, I hope that my life’s ‘meaning’ doesn’t end and isn’t clearly defined until I leave this place.

      Do you think it really comes down to money? They say that money can’t buy happiness – but it can do a lot. It can make things easier, it can allow us to quit a crummy job and start our own business, it can allow us to get away and travel the world, live in a foreign country. It can’t buy you love, but it can buy you damn near everything else, and make you pretty frickin’ happy (Feel free to disagree – I’m shooting from the hip here).

      For me, I desperately want to enjoy the present, but with the future looming, with unanswered questions abound, it’s hard to enjoy and live in the moment. I think a lot of people feel this way – and a lot of us can tell others to do that – but when you take a step back, are you really living for today, every day. Is that even possible when we are in these ‘transition’ phases?

      Here I am, asking more questions. But I will say that I enjoy my life, I try to find the good in everything and everyone. I don’t let my doubt and confusion consume me, and I know that things will work out – if I keep trying and doing my best, I know I will be successful in the end. When life kicks me down, I kick back pretty hard, and as you said, that might be the solution to it all…

  8. Questioning life… it seems that nowadays everybody is going through the same. Is good to know though, I really like reading your posts and to know other people´s points of views. When I started questioning my life (specifically this year), I thought that I was the problem, that I wasn’t being thankful for everything I had. But knowing that almost every single 20something year old is going through the same makes me feel a little better.

    I´m bored of being worried, of having high expectations about life, waiting for a job, or a phone call saying that I got that job that I want so bad. I admire people that one day they decide to go travel for a year around the world. This would be the perfect moment to do it, but I can´t seem to figure out how to get a large amount of money to do that. A whole year off, doing nothing but doing everything… hope I can soon.

    Also successful people in their 30´s that I know are questioning everything. Life goes to fast to spend all the time questioning everything. Some people say that you are not supposed to be worried about your future, and just enjoy the present. That´s what I´m trying to do every day, find joy in things that doesn’t make any sense right now. I think enjoying life is important; it might not be what we have dreamt about, but after all, if we keep trying and trying someday we will get what we deserve. As you said in your post “get back up and kick life back even harder!”… actually that might be the solution to everything.

    • Hola Ana! Thanks for coming by – hope you like what you see and I hope you’ll continue to come back from time to time. I love your writing over at ‘Something Good’.

      It really is good to know that we’re not alone in all this. My story might not be the most unique or the most exciting, but it’s something that almost everyone, if not all of us can relate to, regardless of where you are in life, you have questions, doubts, fears. The quest for the meaning of life is constantly ongoing, I hope that my life’s ‘meaning’ doesn’t end and isn’t clearly defined until I leave this place.

      Do you think it really comes down to money? They say that money can’t buy happiness – but it can do a lot. It can make things easier, it can allow us to quit a crummy job and start our own business, it can allow us to get away and travel the world, live in a foreign country. It can’t buy you love, but it can buy you damn near everything else, and make you pretty frickin’ happy (Feel free to disagree – I’m shooting from the hip here).

      For me, I desperately want to enjoy the present, but with the future looming, with unanswered questions abound, it’s hard to enjoy and live in the moment. I think a lot of people feel this way – and a lot of us can tell others to do that – but when you take a step back, are you really living for today, every day. Is that even possible when we are in these ‘transition’ phases?

      Here I am, asking more questions. But I will say that I enjoy my life, I try to find the good in everything and everyone. I don’t let my doubt and confusion consume me, and I know that things will work out – if I keep trying and doing my best, I know I will be successful in the end. When life kicks me down, I kick back pretty hard, and as you said, that might be the solution to it all…

  9. Matt – I just started following you a short while ago. Lack of years does not mean, a lack of wisdom. As the first poster stated you have put into words what many are feeling and thinking.

    The challenge was about change and we all pretty much agreed that change was difficult.

    Picking on a single comment and I understand that this is all figurative so…but I don’t really think that life is about kicking back hard, because if you kick too hard bad things happen…but when you get kicked it is how you respond to the kick. Do you do nothing, do you get back up, do you run away, do you retaliate or do you ask “why did you do that” (get more information). Different kicks require different responses, some of them must be well measured.

    It seems to me that life is about doing the right things for the right reasons and doing good. If more people did those simple things it would be a better place. I guess I am just naive, but we have to keep moving in the right direction

    But it seems to me that you already do that and will be successful.

    • Harold – thank you for coming by and adding to the discussion sir. I 100% agree with you here – it’s not about reacting aggresively or ‘kicking harder’ but instead, it’s about remaining a fighter through both the good times and the bad. Not giving up, continuing to push through, and staying optimistic.

      Of course, all of this is easier said than done. But as you said, one of the main themes we gathered from the Inconvenience of Change series was that it’s not so much how you bring about change, it’s how you deal with and react to the change that is inevitable.

      I sincerely believe that all people are inherently good and want to do good, bring good to others, etc. Yes, we sway away from that from time to time, but overall, we all strive to move in the same positive direction.

      Thank you for your thoughts here – much appreciated!

  10. Matt – I just started following you a short while ago. Lack of years does not mean, a lack of wisdom. As the first poster stated you have put into words what many are feeling and thinking.

    The challenge was about change and we all pretty much agreed that change was difficult.

    Picking on a single comment and I understand that this is all figurative so…but I don’t really think that life is about kicking back hard, because if you kick too hard bad things happen…but when you get kicked it is how you respond to the kick. Do you do nothing, do you get back up, do you run away, do you retaliate or do you ask “why did you do that” (get more information). Different kicks require different responses, some of them must be well measured.

    It seems to me that life is about doing the right things for the right reasons and doing good. If more people did those simple things it would be a better place. I guess I am just naive, but we have to keep moving in the right direction

    But it seems to me that you already do that and will be successful.

    • Harold – thank you for coming by and adding to the discussion sir. I 100% agree with you here – it’s not about reacting aggresively or ‘kicking harder’ but instead, it’s about remaining a fighter through both the good times and the bad. Not giving up, continuing to push through, and staying optimistic.

      Of course, all of this is easier said than done. But as you said, one of the main themes we gathered from the Inconvenience of Change series was that it’s not so much how you bring about change, it’s how you deal with and react to the change that is inevitable.

      I sincerely believe that all people are inherently good and want to do good, bring good to others, etc. Yes, we sway away from that from time to time, but overall, we all strive to move in the same positive direction.

      Thank you for your thoughts here – much appreciated!

  11. Matt:

    It´s not all about money of course, but as you said it definitely helps. I think it all comes down to the attitude you have… about the transition phase, we will always be in one (from kids to teenagers, teenagers to adults, adults to elders, etc). You never know what´s going to happen next, at this point you can basically do whatever you want with your life (there are always constraints though). So this is the time to try to succeed. We have a lot of chances to correct our mistakes, and these chances tend to disappear as we get older, or at least everything becomes more complicated.

    I agree with what Harold Shaw said in his comment. Responding to the kicks the right way, and being a person of good. We don’t know exactly what to do now, but going through the path of righteousness always has a good outcome (ok, I´m sounding too much like my mom…). All the morals and values are there as a guidance, and if we are lacking some of them we can always learn.

    • Nothing wrong with a little motherly wisdom. The path of righteousness is always a good thing.

      On the ‘money discussion’ – I was mostly playing the devil’s advocate there – but it’s something to think about. We hate to put so much emphasis on money (hell, I don’t care if I’m ever ‘rich’) but it sure would make a lot of things easier, eh?

      Attitude IS the most important thing, I agree. It’s the difference between success and failure, learning from mistakes or wallowing in them, coasting through a life of mediocrity or striving to be more. It’s all about attitude.

      Well said Ana.

  12. Matt:

    It´s not all about money of course, but as you said it definitely helps. I think it all comes down to the attitude you have… about the transition phase, we will always be in one (from kids to teenagers, teenagers to adults, adults to elders, etc). You never know what´s going to happen next, at this point you can basically do whatever you want with your life (there are always constraints though). So this is the time to try to succeed. We have a lot of chances to correct our mistakes, and these chances tend to disappear as we get older, or at least everything becomes more complicated.

    I agree with what Harold Shaw said in his comment. Responding to the kicks the right way, and being a person of good. We don’t know exactly what to do now, but going through the path of righteousness always has a good outcome (ok, I´m sounding too much like my mom…). All the morals and values are there as a guidance, and if we are lacking some of them we can always learn.

    • Nothing wrong with a little motherly wisdom. The path of righteousness is always a good thing.

      On the ‘money discussion’ – I was mostly playing the devil’s advocate there – but it’s something to think about. We hate to put so much emphasis on money (hell, I don’t care if I’m ever ‘rich’) but it sure would make a lot of things easier, eh?

      Attitude IS the most important thing, I agree. It’s the difference between success and failure, learning from mistakes or wallowing in them, coasting through a life of mediocrity or striving to be more. It’s all about attitude.

      Well said Ana.

  13. I love this post because so many people are going through this kind of transition right now. The realities that have surfaced in the past year or two have made life difficult for people around the world. What has made it especially difficult, though, is the fact that many people have worked so hard to get the job or situation that has been recently taken away.

    The one thing that helped me cope with the uncertainty is realizing that I am not in complete control of my future. Life is uncertain almost by definition and recent events have only confirmed this fact. By accepting the fact that we are not in control of keeping our current job or receiving the next job offer, we can embrace infinite possibilities for the future. Those who continue to be open to changes in their life will thrive in an uncertain future.

    • Benjamin – this post was fueled by a lot of things going on in my personal life, as well as what I’m seeing so many of you going through around me – we are definitely not alone in this ‘journey through the unknown’ and that alone provides me with some comfort.

      Accepting and embracing the fact that you’re not invincible and that, at times, accepting the help of others is inevitable is a big step. With that, there is no way we can control the outcome of every event. There are going to be times when you thought you nailed an interview, only to find out you didn’t get the job – times when you think a date went perfectly, only to never get a call back. What’s the moral? Keep your head up – as long as you tried, and did your best, you haven’t failed. There will be other interviews, other potential dates to swoon. Putting that into perspective is half the battle, but will keep you moving and help in maintaining your sanity.

      • That is a good point to make, the fact that “you have tried and done your best then you couldn’t have failed.” I think that is a value that goes against a lot of what people believe. For a long time, it was all about deliverables and statistics.

        Now with all of the hardship found lately, one of the good side effects could be that the focus has gone from statistics to the value of hard work, regardless of result. That is to say I feel people are starting to enjoy the journey more than the destination. This is an important shift in culture and values that I think will become even more important in the future.

        • Results are still important, no doubt about that, but there is a lot to be said for putting your best foot forward, giving it your all, and doing your best, regardless of the outcome. If you’ve done your best, isn’t that all you can do? If you want to live without doubt and regret, give something your all – I guarantee if you fail, there will still be disappointment, but you won’t have the ‘should have, could have, would have’ doubts swirling around.

  14. I love this post because so many people are going through this kind of transition right now. The realities that have surfaced in the past year or two have made life difficult for people around the world. What has made it especially difficult, though, is the fact that many people have worked so hard to get the job or situation that has been recently taken away.

    The one thing that helped me cope with the uncertainty is realizing that I am not in complete control of my future. Life is uncertain almost by definition and recent events have only confirmed this fact. By accepting the fact that we are not in control of keeping our current job or receiving the next job offer, we can embrace infinite possibilities for the future. Those who continue to be open to changes in their life will thrive in an uncertain future.

    • Benjamin – this post was fueled by a lot of things going on in my personal life, as well as what I’m seeing so many of you going through around me – we are definitely not alone in this ‘journey through the unknown’ and that alone provides me with some comfort.

      Accepting and embracing the fact that you’re not invincible and that, at times, accepting the help of others is inevitable is a big step. With that, there is no way we can control the outcome of every event. There are going to be times when you thought you nailed an interview, only to find out you didn’t get the job – times when you think a date went perfectly, only to never get a call back. What’s the moral? Keep your head up – as long as you tried, and did your best, you haven’t failed. There will be other interviews, other potential dates to swoon. Putting that into perspective is half the battle, but will keep you moving and help in maintaining your sanity.

      • That is a good point to make, the fact that “you have tried and done your best then you couldn’t have failed.” I think that is a value that goes against a lot of what people believe. For a long time, it was all about deliverables and statistics.

        Now with all of the hardship found lately, one of the good side effects could be that the focus has gone from statistics to the value of hard work, regardless of result. That is to say I feel people are starting to enjoy the journey more than the destination. This is an important shift in culture and values that I think will become even more important in the future.

        • Results are still important, no doubt about that, but there is a lot to be said for putting your best foot forward, giving it your all, and doing your best, regardless of the outcome. If you’ve done your best, isn’t that all you can do? If you want to live without doubt and regret, give something your all – I guarantee if you fail, there will still be disappointment, but you won’t have the ‘should have, could have, would have’ doubts swirling around.

  15. This entire line of discussion reminds me of two movies you may have seen and I recommend you do if you haven’t, especially if you’re visiting doubt in your life: Office Space and American Beauty.

    Office Space (if you haven’t seen it) takes a comical approach to the “life is at a dead end” condition, and leaves you smiling.

    American Beauty is made of the very same melancholy many of us feel when faced with the task of life.

    Some people look at their life as a gift. Not me. For years I’ve asked why I was given life, by no choice of my current mind forced to live years on earth sifting through circumstantial decisions, societal programming, and all the other bunk we face. Seriously, why bother?

    Seems like a right and natural, even necessary, question. These “why” moments guide us to the answers, if we let them–the answers to how we’re going to spend our time here, how we’re going to survive, and on what level we’ll find enjoyment and freedom in life. Through these checkpoints, we build the motivation to discover possibilities that life’s mysteries present.

    For me, this means finding something that makes me feel good about living. Love makes me feel good. Loving people, loving learning, loving music, loving martial arts, loving the world’s beauty. The journey of life comes in finding these loves, whatever yours may be, and living in them each day after–and if you’re like me, it helps to accept but totally bypass any bullshit humanity has created. This freedom gives me both reason to “bother” with life and reason to be thankful for my experience here.

    When stuck in the well-worn groove of habit and routine, or when clarity is muddled by changing circumstances, I can return to these loves to show me freedom and happiness.

    Like both movies’ protagonists discover, life is better when you like it.

    • Chelsie – in response to you I leave you with an excerpt from a guest-post I had a few months ago: http://smallhandsbigideas.com/generation-y/what-inspires-you-guest-post-xi-matt-cheuvront/

      You’ll see that not only is American Beauty one of my favorite movies – it’s philosophical outlook in like are relate-able to all of us. What’s the point in life if we’re not really LIVING it!

      ‘I am reminded of one of my favorite movies, American Beauty (which if you haven’t seen it I strongly recommend – it will change your perspective on a lot of things). The story tells the tale of Lester Burnham, a husband in a loveless marriage, a father of a daughter who hates him, a man with nothing to live for – going through the motions without ever asking ‘why’? But finally, something clicks, he realizes that in order to make his life worth living, he has to LIVE. He says, “It’s a great thing when you realize you still have the ability to surprise yourself.” – think about that for a second. The ability to surprise yourself, the concept of exceeding your own expectations; it’s a pretty incredible thing.

      That’s what inspires me – striving to do more, to be more, to inspire, educate, enlighten, and entertain others. Of course, my inspiration comes from everywhere – teachers, coworkers, friends, family, peers, fellow bloggers and writers – we’re all inspired by what’s around us, but sometimes we forget how much we can inspire ourselves. Divinity comes from within, and the path to enlightenment is an inward journey. Strive to be better than you think you can be. You’ll end up not only inspiring yourself; you’ll inspire everyone around you.’

  16. This entire line of discussion reminds me of two movies you may have seen and I recommend you do if you haven’t, especially if you’re visiting doubt in your life: Office Space and American Beauty.

    Office Space (if you haven’t seen it) takes a comical approach to the “life is at a dead end” condition, and leaves you smiling.

    American Beauty is made of the very same melancholy many of us feel when faced with the task of life.

    Some people look at their life as a gift. Not me. For years I’ve asked why I was given life, by no choice of my current mind forced to live years on earth sifting through circumstantial decisions, societal programming, and all the other bunk we face. Seriously, why bother?

    Seems like a right and natural, even necessary, question. These “why” moments guide us to the answers, if we let them–the answers to how we’re going to spend our time here, how we’re going to survive, and on what level we’ll find enjoyment and freedom in life. Through these checkpoints, we build the motivation to discover possibilities that life’s mysteries present.

    For me, this means finding something that makes me feel good about living. Love makes me feel good. Loving people, loving learning, loving music, loving martial arts, loving the world’s beauty. The journey of life comes in finding these loves, whatever yours may be, and living in them each day after–and if you’re like me, it helps to accept but totally bypass any bullshit humanity has created. This freedom gives me both reason to “bother” with life and reason to be thankful for my experience here.

    When stuck in the well-worn groove of habit and routine, or when clarity is muddled by changing circumstances, I can return to these loves to show me freedom and happiness.

    Like both movies’ protagonists discover, life is better when you like it.

    • Chelsie – in response to you I leave you with an excerpt from a guest-post I had a few months ago: http://smallhandsbigideas.com/generation-y/what-inspires-you-guest-post-xi-matt-cheuvront/

      You’ll see that not only is American Beauty one of my favorite movies – it’s philosophical outlook in like are relate-able to all of us. What’s the point in life if we’re not really LIVING it!

      ‘I am reminded of one of my favorite movies, American Beauty (which if you haven’t seen it I strongly recommend – it will change your perspective on a lot of things). The story tells the tale of Lester Burnham, a husband in a loveless marriage, a father of a daughter who hates him, a man with nothing to live for – going through the motions without ever asking ‘why’? But finally, something clicks, he realizes that in order to make his life worth living, he has to LIVE. He says, “It’s a great thing when you realize you still have the ability to surprise yourself.” – think about that for a second. The ability to surprise yourself, the concept of exceeding your own expectations; it’s a pretty incredible thing.

      That’s what inspires me – striving to do more, to be more, to inspire, educate, enlighten, and entertain others. Of course, my inspiration comes from everywhere – teachers, coworkers, friends, family, peers, fellow bloggers and writers – we’re all inspired by what’s around us, but sometimes we forget how much we can inspire ourselves. Divinity comes from within, and the path to enlightenment is an inward journey. Strive to be better than you think you can be. You’ll end up not only inspiring yourself; you’ll inspire everyone around you.’

  17. It’s funny how comforting morning reruns can be in times of uncertainty. For me it’s the Angel double feature on TNT. Gotta have my vampire drama every morning. (I have to say I freaked out a little the past couple days when they replaced it with The Closer, as much as I love Kyra Sedgewick.)
    You’re right about the fact that we all go through what you’re describing. I can’t tell you how many times I have re-invented myself. I thought that this time, going back to school with all the experience I have, after graduation I would sail right into the perfect job. But in this economy, with a year left to go, I’m not so sure. You are unbelievably astute for someone who has barely begun this journey into the unknown. It’s true, the light will go out time and time again, and each time you will find a way to re-light it and follow it down another path. The important thing is to connect with the people in your life who make it special, and they will sustain you in times of doubt. There’s always a silver lining. Sometimes it just takes awhile to see it.

    • Heh, yeah, morning reruns can be comforting. Well, sometimes. Watching a bikini scene from Saved By The Bell when you’re older can make you almost make you feel like a child molester. That’s hot.

      Good post, dude. You drew me in real good.

      • Saved by the Bell is pretty wholesome – through and through – now, what the actors went on to afterward (ehem Showgirls) is an entirely different story. Thanks for coming by – glad you liked the post. I have to ask, what exactly IS an ‘A-Hole Guru?’

    • Cathy – thanks so much for coming by and adding your insight. I think we could do an entire psychological study on the ‘comfort’ reruns can provide. I always tell my fiance, I just feel ‘incomplete’ if I don’t watch a little Saved by the Bell in the morning, or Seinfeld in the evening – and I think there’s more to it than it just being part of my ‘routine’. There has to be some reason those shows are still shown again and again, every single day.

      It’s also important to get some wisdom from someone who’s been there. I know my life experience is limited and I’m sort of speaking out of character here, but from my personal experience and what I witness in those around me, the path of going through the unknown and ‘finding oneself’ can be seen in throughout all stages of life.

      I appreciate the accolades and kind words. Sometimes I feel that I have a much older, wiser soul in this 23 year old body of mine (not a bad thing, right?) I hope you will come back from time to time and become a regular reader of Life Without Pants!

      • I find many old souls in 20-something bodies. Likewise I find many children inhabiting the bodies of middle-aged men. (Talk about feeling like a child-molester…) A little Zack and Kelly never hurt anyone.

  18. It’s funny how comforting morning reruns can be in times of uncertainty. For me it’s the Angel double feature on TNT. Gotta have my vampire drama every morning. (I have to say I freaked out a little the past couple days when they replaced it with The Closer, as much as I love Kyra Sedgewick.)
    You’re right about the fact that we all go through what you’re describing. I can’t tell you how many times I have re-invented myself. I thought that this time, going back to school with all the experience I have, after graduation I would sail right into the perfect job. But in this economy, with a year left to go, I’m not so sure. You are unbelievably astute for someone who has barely begun this journey into the unknown. It’s true, the light will go out time and time again, and each time you will find a way to re-light it and follow it down another path. The important thing is to connect with the people in your life who make it special, and they will sustain you in times of doubt. There’s always a silver lining. Sometimes it just takes awhile to see it.

    • Heh, yeah, morning reruns can be comforting. Well, sometimes. Watching a bikini scene from Saved By The Bell when you’re older can make you almost make you feel like a child molester. That’s hot.

      Good post, dude. You drew me in real good.

      • Saved by the Bell is pretty wholesome – through and through – now, what the actors went on to afterward (ehem Showgirls) is an entirely different story. Thanks for coming by – glad you liked the post. I have to ask, what exactly IS an ‘A-Hole Guru?’

    • Cathy – thanks so much for coming by and adding your insight. I think we could do an entire psychological study on the ‘comfort’ reruns can provide. I always tell my fiance, I just feel ‘incomplete’ if I don’t watch a little Saved by the Bell in the morning, or Seinfeld in the evening – and I think there’s more to it than it just being part of my ‘routine’. There has to be some reason those shows are still shown again and again, every single day.

      It’s also important to get some wisdom from someone who’s been there. I know my life experience is limited and I’m sort of speaking out of character here, but from my personal experience and what I witness in those around me, the path of going through the unknown and ‘finding oneself’ can be seen in throughout all stages of life.

      I appreciate the accolades and kind words. Sometimes I feel that I have a much older, wiser soul in this 23 year old body of mine (not a bad thing, right?) I hope you will come back from time to time and become a regular reader of Life Without Pants!

      • I find many old souls in 20-something bodies. Likewise I find many children inhabiting the bodies of middle-aged men. (Talk about feeling like a child-molester…) A little Zack and Kelly never hurt anyone.

  19. Matt. Just discovered your blog. Love it. Honest, funny, and insightful. I feel like we’re on a similar path. I’m at the tail end of trying to get my first book published, walking in complete unknowns, changing, dying, then living, then dying again…

    And because so many insightful things have already been said, as a die-hard Saved by the Bell fan, I leave you this recent clip from Jimmy Fallon’s attempt to re-unite SBTB. http://www.latenightwithjimmyfallon.com/video/clips/saved-by-the-bell-reunion-update-3-6809/1121321/.

    (I knew all the questions before Zack did)

    • Paul. Glad to have you here my man. Any Saved by the Bell junkie is automatically good in my book. Although, I think we might have to initiate some sort of Saved by the Bell trivia throw down. Mr. Belding (Dennis Haskins) came to my college a few years back and I’m proud to say I won his little trivia challenge. I’ve got his signed SBTB cast photo in my office to prove it. I love what Jimmy Fallon is doing – it’s amazing to me how little Mark Paul has changed over the years. I love the ‘Stansbury material’ comment he makes during the interview. Classic.

      Congrats to you – it sounds like you are working on some pretty amazing things. I’m working on a book myself (slowly but surely). I think we all go through phases of ‘living’ and ‘dying’ then being reborn. This is a period of rebirth, not that I necessarily was dead before, but I see this period of my life as somewhat of a spiritual awakening!

      Thanks again for stumbling through this neck of the woods. I hope you’ll continue to come back again and again!

      • Matt I don’t know how you have time for any SBTB with all the great blogs, let alone all the reply’s you do to others comments. You make every one feel very important who takes time to leave a message on your site. I need to do a much better job of that myself, so I thank you for your example.

        And thanks for downloading a chapter from my book. (All download info comes to me, so sorry it’s creepy that I know this). Who am I? What do I do? Who is God? The books spans a deep shaking, stripping time when all the amazing answers I had to all three, were quickly thrown in the fire. So kudos to you and your writing your own story. I know it’s going to be a good one.

        And OK. Let’s do this. I’ll start with an easy one. What does A.C. stand for? Bonus: What two other things does A.C. say it stands for, in two separate episodes?

      • First. You’re gonna’ have to do better than that. A.C. ‘Albert Clifford’ Slater – also known as ‘Abnormally Cruel’ (in the class ring buying episode) and ‘Absolutely Charmed’ (in the Fake ID episode). I’m telling you man – I’ve got my Saved by the Bell trivia down.

        To your other point – I’m not sure how I make time for all of this myself – but I really place a lot of value on the community involvement here. Stay tuned tomorrow, I’m actually crafting a post about this exact subject.

        I’m looking forward to reading the chapter from your book. I’m actually working on one that is somewhat similar aptly titled ‘Life Without Pants’ (go figure).

        I leave you with two questions to ponder:

        What tickets were the ‘gang’ trying to buy in the ‘mall’ episode?

        What is the name of the clothing store Kelly works at in the ‘Christmas Mall’ episode?

  20. Matt. Just discovered your blog. Love it. Honest, funny, and insightful. I feel like we’re on a similar path. I’m at the tail end of trying to get my first book published, walking in complete unknowns, changing, dying, then living, then dying again…

    And because so many insightful things have already been said, as a die-hard Saved by the Bell fan, I leave you this recent clip from Jimmy Fallon’s attempt to re-unite SBTB. http://www.latenightwithjimmyfallon.com/video/clips/saved-by-the-bell-reunion-update-3-6809/1121321/.

    (I knew all the questions before Zack did)

    • Paul. Glad to have you here my man. Any Saved by the Bell junkie is automatically good in my book. Although, I think we might have to initiate some sort of Saved by the Bell trivia throw down. Mr. Belding (Dennis Haskins) came to my college a few years back and I’m proud to say I won his little trivia challenge. I’ve got his signed SBTB cast photo in my office to prove it. I love what Jimmy Fallon is doing – it’s amazing to me how little Mark Paul has changed over the years. I love the ‘Stansbury material’ comment he makes during the interview. Classic.

      Congrats to you – it sounds like you are working on some pretty amazing things. I’m working on a book myself (slowly but surely). I think we all go through phases of ‘living’ and ‘dying’ then being reborn. This is a period of rebirth, not that I necessarily was dead before, but I see this period of my life as somewhat of a spiritual awakening!

      Thanks again for stumbling through this neck of the woods. I hope you’ll continue to come back again and again!

      • Matt I don’t know how you have time for any SBTB with all the great blogs, let alone all the reply’s you do to others comments. You make every one feel very important who takes time to leave a message on your site. I need to do a much better job of that myself, so I thank you for your example.

        And thanks for downloading a chapter from my book. (All download info comes to me, so sorry it’s creepy that I know this). Who am I? What do I do? Who is God? The books spans a deep shaking, stripping time when all the amazing answers I had to all three, were quickly thrown in the fire. So kudos to you and your writing your own story. I know it’s going to be a good one.

        And OK. Let’s do this. I’ll start with an easy one. What does A.C. stand for? Bonus: What two other things does A.C. say it stands for, in two separate episodes?

      • First. You’re gonna’ have to do better than that. A.C. ‘Albert Clifford’ Slater – also known as ‘Abnormally Cruel’ (in the class ring buying episode) and ‘Absolutely Charmed’ (in the Fake ID episode). I’m telling you man – I’ve got my Saved by the Bell trivia down.

        To your other point – I’m not sure how I make time for all of this myself – but I really place a lot of value on the community involvement here. Stay tuned tomorrow, I’m actually crafting a post about this exact subject.

        I’m looking forward to reading the chapter from your book. I’m actually working on one that is somewhat similar aptly titled ‘Life Without Pants’ (go figure).

        I leave you with two questions to ponder:

        What tickets were the ‘gang’ trying to buy in the ‘mall’ episode?

        What is the name of the clothing store Kelly works at in the ‘Christmas Mall’ episode?

  21. Ah, I love this. It’s right up my alley. The gang is after U2 tickets. 90s TV show characters always seemed to be finding random bags of money people had somehow managed to misplace. I don’t know how it became a common theme, but I’ll have to keep a more careful watch for abandoned moneybags at the mall.

    As for the store Kelly works at…wasn’t it something like Moody’s department store? I think it was a men’s clothing shop.

    Bring on the SbTB challenge!

    • Nice. The U2 one was a little easier. And you’re right – almost every 90’s sitcom has a ‘finding a bag of money’ episode. I’m pretty impressed you got Moody’s Store for Men. Nicely done indeed. I know the two questions you posed below, but I’m going to let someone else take a crack at them!

      (Loving how somehow this thread has turned into a SbtB trivia throwdown!)

  22. Ah, I love this. It’s right up my alley. The gang is after U2 tickets. 90s TV show characters always seemed to be finding random bags of money people had somehow managed to misplace. I don’t know how it became a common theme, but I’ll have to keep a more careful watch for abandoned moneybags at the mall.

    As for the store Kelly works at…wasn’t it something like Moody’s department store? I think it was a men’s clothing shop.

    Bring on the SbTB challenge!

    • Nice. The U2 one was a little easier. And you’re right – almost every 90’s sitcom has a ‘finding a bag of money’ episode. I’m pretty impressed you got Moody’s Store for Men. Nicely done indeed. I know the two questions you posed below, but I’m going to let someone else take a crack at them!

      (Loving how somehow this thread has turned into a SbtB trivia throwdown!)

  23. Okay, here are two more to ponder:

    1.What’s the name of the Russian exchange student who is supposed to play Screech in the chess game?

    2. Where does the gang go for Jessie’s dad’s wedding?

  24. Okay, here are two more to ponder:

    1.What’s the name of the Russian exchange student who is supposed to play Screech in the chess game?

    2. Where does the gang go for Jessie’s dad’s wedding?

  25. @Matt well done my friend. I applaud that you knew both renditions of A.C. and from what episodes! Geesh, that wasn’t an easy one. At least so I thought.

    @Mara, nice. You got U2 and Moody’s before I could get there. I love the Moody’s Christmas episode. Especially when it starts snowing in the hospital with the kids. Why and how is it snowing? I would, and still, ask that question.

    As for your two questions Mara. Good ones…

    1. Breshnev sp? I think is the Valley chess player.

    Spinoff Question: What was the name of the magazine the girl from Valley said she was representing? And if you know her name too because I can’t and it’s driving me crazy.

    2. Palm Springs is Jessie’s dad’s wedding.

    My question is tri-fold: What is the name of the product the gang designs and sales for their business class? What was the name of the spin-off product? Then as well, what did the other groups propose for their products?

    • “This is Melvin Moody, and I’m in a bad moody…I mean mood!” (When he calls the cops thinking that homeless chick stole the suit).

      @Paul. I seriously LOL’ed at work while reading your comment about it snowing in the hospital. I vividly remember that little kid in the hospital saying ‘It never snows in Los Angeles’. How long did it take for the hospital to rig the cieling with snow machines?

      I’ll leave your first question to someone else, but I can dominate the second one:

      Friendship Bracelets + Buddy Bands (hey, they work!) = Love Cuffs.

      As for the other groups, I remember there was the ‘Pocket protector protector’ and that fold-up surfboard made out of cardboard.

      • Haha…Matt you definitely got me going with the Moody line! Love it. How the Saved by the Bell writers came up with such witty lines, I haven’t the faintest? Ha.

        The line that goes down as one of my favorites is from the illustrious Lisa Turtle, “If you don’t get rid of Linda, I’m going to throw her out the ‘winda’. I chuckle sheepishly just writing it now.

        And right on with your answer. Thought I might get you with the pocket protector protector and fold up board, but seriously, who can forget inventions like that.

        All right Matt, I know we could do SBTB triv all month and that’s really not the point. So I’ll shoot with my favorite stumper, off-the-wall, question.

        In the opening credits that they used the most with the theme song. (Not the one where they listed Ed Alonzo). In those credits, I believe it’s the very last shot, the gang does a group high five. I’m trying to remember what episode it’s from, I think maybe oil spill. Anyway, one member misses all the hands and their hand goes all the way through. (no cheating) Who was this person?

  26. @Matt well done my friend. I applaud that you knew both renditions of A.C. and from what episodes! Geesh, that wasn’t an easy one. At least so I thought.

    @Mara, nice. You got U2 and Moody’s before I could get there. I love the Moody’s Christmas episode. Especially when it starts snowing in the hospital with the kids. Why and how is it snowing? I would, and still, ask that question.

    As for your two questions Mara. Good ones…

    1. Breshnev sp? I think is the Valley chess player.

    Spinoff Question: What was the name of the magazine the girl from Valley said she was representing? And if you know her name too because I can’t and it’s driving me crazy.

    2. Palm Springs is Jessie’s dad’s wedding.

    My question is tri-fold: What is the name of the product the gang designs and sales for their business class? What was the name of the spin-off product? Then as well, what did the other groups propose for their products?

    • “This is Melvin Moody, and I’m in a bad moody…I mean mood!” (When he calls the cops thinking that homeless chick stole the suit).

      @Paul. I seriously LOL’ed at work while reading your comment about it snowing in the hospital. I vividly remember that little kid in the hospital saying ‘It never snows in Los Angeles’. How long did it take for the hospital to rig the cieling with snow machines?

      I’ll leave your first question to someone else, but I can dominate the second one:

      Friendship Bracelets + Buddy Bands (hey, they work!) = Love Cuffs.

      As for the other groups, I remember there was the ‘Pocket protector protector’ and that fold-up surfboard made out of cardboard.

      • Haha…Matt you definitely got me going with the Moody line! Love it. How the Saved by the Bell writers came up with such witty lines, I haven’t the faintest? Ha.

        The line that goes down as one of my favorites is from the illustrious Lisa Turtle, “If you don’t get rid of Linda, I’m going to throw her out the ‘winda’. I chuckle sheepishly just writing it now.

        And right on with your answer. Thought I might get you with the pocket protector protector and fold up board, but seriously, who can forget inventions like that.

        All right Matt, I know we could do SBTB triv all month and that’s really not the point. So I’ll shoot with my favorite stumper, off-the-wall, question.

        In the opening credits that they used the most with the theme song. (Not the one where they listed Ed Alonzo). In those credits, I believe it’s the very last shot, the gang does a group high five. I’m trying to remember what episode it’s from, I think maybe oil spill. Anyway, one member misses all the hands and their hand goes all the way through. (no cheating) Who was this person?