On How I Stopped Holding Myself Back and Where I Am Today

60 days ago I had a job at a respectable ad agency, a two-bedroom apartment, and a semi-comfortable way of life. 60 days later I’ve gotten engaged, quit my job, packed my bags, and moved to Chicago without a plan. Talk about big changes. It’s funny how much you really MOVE when you start trying – how much you surprise yourself when you dare to be different.

Throughout this journey, a lot of you have stopped and asked me how it’s going, if I had any regrets, and if, looking back, I would have done anything differently. I’ve also learned that a lot of you are in the same boat I was – feeling trapped, wanting to take a leap of faith but being held back by your own fear and doubt. I wanted to take some time to give you a personal update on how things have gone for me over these past 60 days, the challenges I’ve had to overcome, and how empowered you feel when you stop trying and start doing.

Overcoming the “I can’t” dilemma

As my fiance can attest to, I was scared shitless to make this leap of faith. To quit my job with essentially no money, nothing else lined up, and no idea of what I would be doing once I got here. I spent many sleepless night battling my own fear – a fear that had dominated my decision-making time and time again in the past – that fear of failure whose grasp is all too powerful and all too familiar.

I took a step back and really looked at where my life was going if I remained on the same path – and all I could think of is ‘nowhere’. While preaching about the power of change and overcoming it’s inconvenience here, I found myself victim to the cautionary lifestyle I was inspiring all of you to break free from. Putting things into perspective, I realized that even if I tried and failed, I would, worst case scenario, be no worse off than my current state. As cliche’ as it may sound, I had an epiphany. When you realize that the only thing holding you back is yourself, that you have to do what’s best for you, regardless of what some people may think – you’re able to take ownership of your own life and can take that first step.

The no-money mindset

Realistically and financially speaking, this move made absolutely no sense. I’m 23 years old with one whole year of ‘real world’ experience under my belt and barely enough money to last me a couple months. From the outside looking in, I probably look absolutely bat-shit insane. But odds are, you’re probably in the same boat. Ask yourself this: When WILL be the right time to make the move? When WILL you have enough money? 6 months? A year? Several years? Will there ever be a right time? Maybe today is that day. With a little initiative and creativity you can find some work out there to sustain while you make the transition. Social media is a freelancer’s dream. Money may be a contributing factor to your obstacles, but should never be the only thing holding you back.

Finding a job in a recession

You don’t need me to tell you that these are extremely trying times in our nation’s economy. The bottom line? Jobs are at a premium. But with that being said, they ARE out there. No matter how bad the economy gets, there will always be someone out there who needs someone like you. Today it has become all the more important to showcase your outstanding qualities, define your personal brand, and tell people not only who you are, but more importantly what you can do for them.

We’ve all heard the concept of “It’s not what you do but who you know” – and in times like these, it is absolutely true. Network, network, network! Get on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn – start a blog if you haven’t already – reach out to people who can help you – learn from those who have come before you. The days of scouring job boards in hopes of finding your dream gig are long gone – that’s what everyone else is doing. You have to be different, you have to get creative in your approach. While everyone is storming the front door, focus on picking the lock and sneaking in the back. I’ve tried both approaches, and ultimately have had much more success when I had an “in” – the challenge is figuring out what exactly that is for you.

Overcoming failure and knowing disappointment is inevitable

When I made the decision to quit my job and move to Chicago – I knew there was going to be a difficult road ahead. Accepting that it wont be easy is half the battle. Leaving my Mom and Dad was one of the hardest things I’ve ever done – leaving 23 years of my life behind me in Nashville was tough, because it’s all I’ve ever known. In Nashville, I felt like I was somebody – here in Chicago, I’m a very small fish in a large pond.

I sent out a countless number of resumes without ever hearing anything back. I went through many interviews only to get the generic rejection email. I spent night after night lying in bed wondering if I had made a huge mistake. But now, I look back – and all of those failures – all of those disappointments – they all made me who I am right now: someone who has grown exponentially within the past year of his life. To think that I was just graduating college a little over a year ago boggles my mind.

I would love to be able to tell you that my confidence has been unwavering through all this – but I’m a terrible liar. I’ve doubted myself time and time again – but each time, I’ve persevered and have been able to restore and build that confidence within myself. Today, I understand that insanity and brilliance go hand in hand – and as crazy as all this might have been, I know I’m doing the right thing. To hell with what everyone else tells you not to do – you’re the one in the drivers seat.

Settling is for suckers

If you’ve gone through anything like I have, you can relate to that overwhelming feeling of desperation; “I have to take whatever job I can get”. Employers out there are throwing out low-ball offers to young twenty-somethings because they “can” – they think they have the leverage. If you won’t take the $25,000 salary – someone else out there in the overflowing talent pool who’s more desperate will.

But I see the tables turning – fewer Gen Y’ers are desperate nowadays. Why? Because we can make it on our own. Why do you think there are so may startup companies popping up everywhere? We’re tired of “Corporate America”, we’re tired of being treated like an employee and not as a human being. We’re less willing to settle for ANY job.

In my case, through freelance and contract work – I was able to sustain (and get some very valuable experience) until I found a great job – one that was worth holding out for. In my time of ‘desperation’ I actually turned down a few job offers. The moral? You don’t have to settle – and shouldn’t. Call it the over-entitled Gen Y mentality speaking, but you’re better than that.

To be continued

This is less about me and more about you. My story isn’t anything to write home about – and this is only the beginning of a long road ahead. But what I hope it shows is what can be done will be done. I try to keep from getting too personal here as I don’t want this to turn into a diary, but if you’re interested in witnessing the evolution of a man, stay tuned – it’s going to be an exciting ride.


144 Responses
  • Kimberley Mosher Reply

    Reading this post was like looking in a mirror, as I am also 23, left a paying job 60 days ago to move across Canada, not for a fiancee, but for family and to start a new chapter of my life. Anyone reading this post should be inspired to say “why not?” more often; as frightening as unemployment or any other selfinflicted hardship is, you will never know what is possible or what you are capable of untill you try. Thank you for sharing your personal story, as it reminds me that I’ve made the right decision to fly by the seat of my pants and find out what I truly want to do while living in a place I truly want to be!

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks Kimberly (and welcome – first time here, eh?) Where I was and where I am today – they feel worlds apart. a few months ago I felt like I was getting too content with my discomfort – that I had sort of just ‘bought’ into the daily routine that wasn’t really getting me anywhere. I knew something had to change and sometimes it’s best to just rip it off like a band-aid. As I said above, even though it’s a personal journey I’m sharing, it’s less about me and more about you – if I can act as an example and help inspire a few people to say ‘why not’ and go for it – that’s all the fulfillment (and more) I could ever ask for.

    • Andy R. Racer Reply

      I wish you the best with all that you do and will do.

      Godspeed,

      Andy R. Racer

    • Mike Goodwin Reply

      Hi I found your story so similar to my life. I have always been a caretaker which means I take care of everybody else and put my dreams on the back burner. I can move now nothing is holding me back. I am the only one doing that. I am unhappy where I am in life. I need a change I have been inspired by you wish me luck thank you

  • Kimberley Mosher Reply

    Reading this post was like looking in a mirror, as I am also 23, left a paying job 60 days ago to move across Canada, not for a fiancee, but for family and to start a new chapter of my life. Anyone reading this post should be inspired to say “why not?” more often; as frightening as unemployment or any other selfinflicted hardship is, you will never know what is possible or what you are capable of untill you try. Thank you for sharing your personal story, as it reminds me that I’ve made the right decision to fly by the seat of my pants and find out what I truly want to do while living in a place I truly want to be!

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks Kimberly (and welcome – first time here, eh?) Where I was and where I am today – they feel worlds apart. a few months ago I felt like I was getting too content with my discomfort – that I had sort of just ‘bought’ into the daily routine that wasn’t really getting me anywhere. I knew something had to change and sometimes it’s best to just rip it off like a band-aid. As I said above, even though it’s a personal journey I’m sharing, it’s less about me and more about you – if I can act as an example and help inspire a few people to say ‘why not’ and go for it – that’s all the fulfillment (and more) I could ever ask for.

  • Joanie Reply

    Wow it’s amazing how this post is re-running in other people’s lives across the world, me also 23! have just closed a chapter on my student life and now exploring further avenues, wanting to change patterns, and find a path that will give me some meaning but I’m not exactly sure where that path is yet, and I don’t want to settle for a mediocre path. Sometimes we need to be reminded that the risks that we have made in life whether successful or not were more rewarding than staying in a place that we are use to. So I would like to thank you for this post, it will be something that I will help me in future decisions. I wish you all the best for your new move.

    • Matt Reply

      Joanie – thanks for coming by and sharing your thoughts. Through my experiences – I’ve seen so many people who are in a similar situation as me – change is inconvenient, so much so that there was an entire month of posts dedicated to that exact topic back in May. Overcoming the fear of failure and self doubt is some of the hardest work we’ll ever have to do. But there is power in numbers, and much to be learned from one another as we embark on our individual journeys. Thank you very much for the kind words and well wishes – I wish you the best of luck as well. Cheers!

  • Joanie Reply

    Wow it’s amazing how this post is re-running in other people’s lives across the world, me also 23! have just closed a chapter on my student life and now exploring further avenues, wanting to change patterns, and find a path that will give me some meaning but I’m not exactly sure where that path is yet, and I don’t want to settle for a mediocre path. Sometimes we need to be reminded that the risks that we have made in life whether successful or not were more rewarding than staying in a place that we are use to. So I would like to thank you for this post, it will be something that I will help me in future decisions. I wish you all the best for your new move.

    • Matt Reply

      Joanie – thanks for coming by and sharing your thoughts. Through my experiences – I’ve seen so many people who are in a similar situation as me – change is inconvenient, so much so that there was an entire month of posts dedicated to that exact topic back in May. Overcoming the fear of failure and self doubt is some of the hardest work we’ll ever have to do. But there is power in numbers, and much to be learned from one another as we embark on our individual journeys. Thank you very much for the kind words and well wishes – I wish you the best of luck as well. Cheers!

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    Get ready to me asking you a lot of questions next year man. I can already relate to all this, even before actually moving to Perth.
    What can one say? These life decisions are not for everyone, fear rules most people’s minds.
    Moving has to be one of the best ways to feel alive, the thrill, the rush, it’s just priceless, whatever the so-called “mistakes” are.
    Keep your remarkable life going Matt, you’re a deeply supported.

    • Matt Reply

      The support from you, everyone else here, and many others has been overwhelming, to say the least. To have so many complete strangers rally behind me means two things. One: I must be doing something worth rallying behind and two: my story must be extremely relate-able for many of you out there. I know that these are struggles and obstacles all of us are striving to overcome. Instead of being controlled by my mistakes – I use them as motivation to do and be more. Thanks, as always, for your support, encouragement, and friendship Carlos. Much appreciated!

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    Get ready to me asking you a lot of questions next year man. I can already relate to all this, even before actually moving to Perth.
    What can one say? These life decisions are not for everyone, fear rules most people’s minds.
    Moving has to be one of the best ways to feel alive, the thrill, the rush, it’s just priceless, whatever the so-called “mistakes” are.
    Keep your remarkable life going Matt, you’re a deeply supported.

    • Matt Reply

      The support from you, everyone else here, and many others has been overwhelming, to say the least. To have so many complete strangers rally behind me means two things. One: I must be doing something worth rallying behind and two: my story must be extremely relate-able for many of you out there. I know that these are struggles and obstacles all of us are striving to overcome. Instead of being controlled by my mistakes – I use them as motivation to do and be more. Thanks, as always, for your support, encouragement, and friendship Carlos. Much appreciated!

  • Stuart Foster Reply

    Chicago is an awesome place (and one I desperately want to get back to). I also threw caution to the wind and flew out there with a backpack and little else. Unfortunately, it ended up not working out. However, it taught me a lot about myself, and what I want in life.

    I want to succeed. I don’t know what that looks like yet or how it will come about…but I know it will happen. I just need to take solace in the fact that the economy isn’t important. The only things that do matter? The opportunities that you seek out.

    • Matt Reply

      We’ll have to chat sometime Stuart – I didn’t know about your move out to Chicago. I think you are already on a great path to success Stuart – whatever that means to you specifically – but you are doing big things on the web as we speak. You’re mindset is spot on, you cant linger on the fact that the economy is in shambles – you have to maintain that there are opportunities out there, and while it may be much more difficult to find them – you WILL find them.

  • Stuart Foster Reply

    Chicago is an awesome place (and one I desperately want to get back to). I also threw caution to the wind and flew out there with a backpack and little else. Unfortunately, it ended up not working out. However, it taught me a lot about myself, and what I want in life.

    I want to succeed. I don’t know what that looks like yet or how it will come about…but I know it will happen. I just need to take solace in the fact that the economy isn’t important. The only things that do matter? The opportunities that you seek out.

    • Matt Reply

      We’ll have to chat sometime Stuart – I didn’t know about your move out to Chicago. I think you are already on a great path to success Stuart – whatever that means to you specifically – but you are doing big things on the web as we speak. You’re mindset is spot on, you cant linger on the fact that the economy is in shambles – you have to maintain that there are opportunities out there, and while it may be much more difficult to find them – you WILL find them.

  • Preston Reply

    I can say, I too am in a somewhat similar position. 22, with 2 solid internships of experiance, and uncertainty rapidly approaching at the end of this summer when my current position is set to either continue, or not. But one thing is pretty certain: that I’m determained to make a move by fall. Decidedly a move in living location, but still not so clear as to whether it’s going to be into another position, exploring new oppertunities, or starting something up on my own. It’s not an entirely inconvenient change because it’s welcomed and exciting, but that’s not to say it’s going to be ANY kind of easy.

    Networking fellow Gen-Yers and reading posts like this (and posts from the commenter above me) about people my age and in similar situations really gives me some reassurance that my sense of urgency and wanting to move forward (sometimes with no-so-solid footing) is not something I’m alone on. And that these kinds of risks are sometimes worth taking.

    • Matt Reply

      Yes, even the changes we are willing to make are usually not any easier. You are not alone – and there will be a lot of people around you doing the same thing. That’s one thing that eased my stress – looking at the others who took the leap before me and learning from their successes and failures. It’s an ongoing evolution and I am by no means at the end of the road – but taking the first step, getting myself here, finding a job – those were my top priorities. I’ve done that now, my feet are somewhat firm, and I’m ready to take the next step forward.

  • Preston Reply

    I can say, I too am in a somewhat similar position. 22, with 2 solid internships of experiance, and uncertainty rapidly approaching at the end of this summer when my current position is set to either continue, or not. But one thing is pretty certain: that I’m determained to make a move by fall. Decidedly a move in living location, but still not so clear as to whether it’s going to be into another position, exploring new oppertunities, or starting something up on my own. It’s not an entirely inconvenient change because it’s welcomed and exciting, but that’s not to say it’s going to be ANY kind of easy.

    Networking fellow Gen-Yers and reading posts like this (and posts from the commenter above me) about people my age and in similar situations really gives me some reassurance that my sense of urgency and wanting to move forward (sometimes with no-so-solid footing) is not something I’m alone on. And that these kinds of risks are sometimes worth taking.

    • Matt Reply

      Yes, even the changes we are willing to make are usually not any easier. You are not alone – and there will be a lot of people around you doing the same thing. That’s one thing that eased my stress – looking at the others who took the leap before me and learning from their successes and failures. It’s an ongoing evolution and I am by no means at the end of the road – but taking the first step, getting myself here, finding a job – those were my top priorities. I’ve done that now, my feet are somewhat firm, and I’m ready to take the next step forward.

  • Grace Reply

    I can’t wait to hear more of the journey. You are right to point out that our generation in particular, has this power to step out alone and MAKE IT HAPPEN. That’s pretty exciting stuff.

    I feel your pain and understand that confidence is compromised. Fear was just a part of my everyday life, but I began to trust, work hard and believe in myself. Then I realized fear kept me going. Fear drove me to network and interview more and probably led me to my job. If we can turn around fear, make it a catalyst, turn it into adrenaline and power…then you can find success. Congratulations, Matt! Can’t wait to hear more :)

    • Matt Reply

      Grace – when I spoke above about following in others footsteps – you were one of the people I was talking about. You took a huge cross-country leap of faith, and look at where you are today. It’s a testament to what taking a risk can lead to. When you trust and believe in yourself, your potential is limitless. We (you and I) have used that fear as motivation to persevere and push onward – it’s a pretty powerful thing, when fear is staring you in the face and you’re able to overcome and make things happen. Good for you, good for me, we’re making fear our bitch – I feel like this reply deserves a high-five moment to cap it off. Virtual high five to you Grace!

  • Grace Reply

    I can’t wait to hear more of the journey. You are right to point out that our generation in particular, has this power to step out alone and MAKE IT HAPPEN. That’s pretty exciting stuff.

    I feel your pain and understand that confidence is compromised. Fear was just a part of my everyday life, but I began to trust, work hard and believe in myself. Then I realized fear kept me going. Fear drove me to network and interview more and probably led me to my job. If we can turn around fear, make it a catalyst, turn it into adrenaline and power…then you can find success. Congratulations, Matt! Can’t wait to hear more :)

    • Matt Reply

      Grace – when I spoke above about following in others footsteps – you were one of the people I was talking about. You took a huge cross-country leap of faith, and look at where you are today. It’s a testament to what taking a risk can lead to. When you trust and believe in yourself, your potential is limitless. We (you and I) have used that fear as motivation to persevere and push onward – it’s a pretty powerful thing, when fear is staring you in the face and you’re able to overcome and make things happen. Good for you, good for me, we’re making fear our bitch – I feel like this reply deserves a high-five moment to cap it off. Virtual high five to you Grace!

  • Valerie M Reply

    Very moving post. I like the sentiment that there’s never going to be the right time to do anything.. so you might as well do it now.

    • Matt Reply

      Exactly Valerie – sometimes there never is a ‘right time’. You have to tell yourself that now is just as good a time as any. It might be easier said then done, but we are the masters of our own destiny, and sometimes have to be reminded of that.

  • Valerie M Reply

    Very moving post. I like the sentiment that there’s never going to be the right time to do anything.. so you might as well do it now.

    • Matt Reply

      Exactly Valerie – sometimes there never is a ‘right time’. You have to tell yourself that now is just as good a time as any. It might be easier said then done, but we are the masters of our own destiny, and sometimes have to be reminded of that.

  • Chelsie Reply

    I think we could survive life on Yoda quotes. I feel ya Matt, honestly. We tie our own ropes with self-doubt and fearful second guessing. You know I’m writing a blog of my own, as well as recording music and teaching karate. I feel confident in some areas more than others, even though my ability in each is worthy of AT LEAST my own confidence. I should feel that way. And we all should feel that way about our potential, otherwise, we live in a mental world of fails consoled by thoughts of “at least I tried”, even though we never had a backbone strong enough for success in the first place.

    Ability is charged by confidence, which turns our potential energy into the kinetic, change-inducing kind. if it doesn’t feel like what you’ve got is worth a damn, then maybe an identity re-evaluation is in order (and I’m so talking to the mirror right now). Settling really IS for suckers. You have what you need. Do it. After all, the only way to live is to live, moment by moment, day by day, and know that our actions AND thoughts are fully conscious choices made by US, with our knowledge of the past and hopes for the future. We have complete capability to direct life where we’d like to be living-geographically, emotionally/mentally, situationally. There truly is no “try” in existence. We either do it, or we don’t. If we fail at something, it’s not because we tried and failed, it’s because we chose a thought or action that inhibited our endeavor. And that’s ok, because it’s apart of the experience, and we learn an important lesson from those off-choices: what not to do.
    And through it all, we’re creating our life, engaging in what we appreciate, changing what we don’t. Living.

    • Matt Reply

      Your thoughts and words continue to inspire me Chelsie. And you’re right – we either do it, or we don’t – We write our own story – and in the end, everything comes down to choice. Will you choose to grab the reigns and run your own life or will you fall victim to ‘reality’? I’ve experience what the latter feels like and will choose the former every step of the way moving forward.

  • Chelsie Reply

    I think we could survive life on Yoda quotes. I feel ya Matt, honestly. We tie our own ropes with self-doubt and fearful second guessing. You know I’m writing a blog of my own, as well as recording music and teaching karate. I feel confident in some areas more than others, even though my ability in each is worthy of AT LEAST my own confidence. I should feel that way. And we all should feel that way about our potential, otherwise, we live in a mental world of fails consoled by thoughts of “at least I tried”, even though we never had a backbone strong enough for success in the first place.

    Ability is charged by confidence, which turns our potential energy into the kinetic, change-inducing kind. if it doesn’t feel like what you’ve got is worth a damn, then maybe an identity re-evaluation is in order (and I’m so talking to the mirror right now). Settling really IS for suckers. You have what you need. Do it. After all, the only way to live is to live, moment by moment, day by day, and know that our actions AND thoughts are fully conscious choices made by US, with our knowledge of the past and hopes for the future. We have complete capability to direct life where we’d like to be living-geographically, emotionally/mentally, situationally. There truly is no “try” in existence. We either do it, or we don’t. If we fail at something, it’s not because we tried and failed, it’s because we chose a thought or action that inhibited our endeavor. And that’s ok, because it’s apart of the experience, and we learn an important lesson from those off-choices: what not to do.
    And through it all, we’re creating our life, engaging in what we appreciate, changing what we don’t. Living.

    • Matt Reply

      Your thoughts and words continue to inspire me Chelsie. And you’re right – we either do it, or we don’t – We write our own story – and in the end, everything comes down to choice. Will you choose to grab the reigns and run your own life or will you fall victim to ‘reality’? I’ve experience what the latter feels like and will choose the former every step of the way moving forward.

  • Tony Ruiz Reply

    That is exciting man! I’m glad you went out there and took some chances. I’m one year away from graduation and different thoughts of what I’m going to do after graduation linger in my mind everyday. I have options and I know I just need to choose a path and run with it. Looking forward on hearing how your journey unfolds.

    • Matt Reply

      Whatever the path is – make sure you’re choosing the one FOR YOU – not one that others are pushing you to walk down. Even if it means disappointing some people – do a lot of thinking over the next year and figure out what you want to do – or what path you should go down to best achieve personal success. The offer is on the table – if you ever need a hand through your journey, don’t hesitate to get in touch with me.

  • Tony Ruiz Reply

    That is exciting man! I’m glad you went out there and took some chances. I’m one year away from graduation and different thoughts of what I’m going to do after graduation linger in my mind everyday. I have options and I know I just need to choose a path and run with it. Looking forward on hearing how your journey unfolds.

    • Matt Reply

      Whatever the path is – make sure you’re choosing the one FOR YOU – not one that others are pushing you to walk down. Even if it means disappointing some people – do a lot of thinking over the next year and figure out what you want to do – or what path you should go down to best achieve personal success. The offer is on the table – if you ever need a hand through your journey, don’t hesitate to get in touch with me.

  • David Cain Reply

    I think this is awesome. The older I get the more I realize that it’s actually security that is so dangerous. Same job, same activities, same routine… it’s too risky for someone with an adventurous mind.

    And you’re not alone. I think a lot of us Gen-Y-ers are fed up with the conformist lifestyles we’ve been prescribed, and I see a lot more people doing what you’re doing. I’m in the same boat. I ditched my job and booked a flight to New Zealand for this fall. I have a few months’ worth of money and no prospects at this point. Feels great.

    Good for you, I bet this turns out to be the best decision you ever made.

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks David – I couldn’t have said it any better myself. Security is something we all strive for, but it’s also an incredibly terrifying state of mind to be in. I’ve spoke to the point of being TOO content with where you are – I strive to do more, be more, achieve new things, and challenge myself in new ways. Life is about moving, not standing still – I believe and live within that mantra every day of my life.

  • David Cain Reply

    I think this is awesome. The older I get the more I realize that it’s actually security that is so dangerous. Same job, same activities, same routine… it’s too risky for someone with an adventurous mind.

    And you’re not alone. I think a lot of us Gen-Y-ers are fed up with the conformist lifestyles we’ve been prescribed, and I see a lot more people doing what you’re doing. I’m in the same boat. I ditched my job and booked a flight to New Zealand for this fall. I have a few months’ worth of money and no prospects at this point. Feels great.

    Good for you, I bet this turns out to be the best decision you ever made.

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks David – I couldn’t have said it any better myself. Security is something we all strive for, but it’s also an incredibly terrifying state of mind to be in. I’ve spoke to the point of being TOO content with where you are – I strive to do more, be more, achieve new things, and challenge myself in new ways. Life is about moving, not standing still – I believe and live within that mantra every day of my life.

  • Kerri Reply

    I just realized something screwy happened with my comment above! Let me repost:

    It’s funny. I ask myself those questions all the time, except instead of being about money and financial security, they’re about having a baby: When WILL be the right time to (have a baby)? When WILL you have enough money (to have a baby)? ? 6 months? A year? Several years? Will there ever be a right time (to have a baby)? Maybe today is that day. (DEAR GOD, I HOPE NOT.)

    The point is, it’s the same set of questions that can really be applied to anything in your life that you’re kind of/sort of afraid of doing/getting on with. Good luck with everything!

    • Matt Reply

      Great point Kerri – you’ve illustrated that these questions apply to whatever might be going on in our life. When is the right time to have a baby, when is the right time to quit my job, move to another city, buy a new pair of socks. Whatever it is, it’s not all about cause and effect, it’s about choices (Full disclosure: I was going to quote The Matrix here but I’ll keep my nerdiness at bay, for now). Thanks for adding to the discussion, I hope you’ll continue to contribute to the community here over time. Cheers!

  • Kerri Reply

    I just realized something screwy happened with my comment above! Let me repost:

    It’s funny. I ask myself those questions all the time, except instead of being about money and financial security, they’re about having a baby: When WILL be the right time to (have a baby)? When WILL you have enough money (to have a baby)? ? 6 months? A year? Several years? Will there ever be a right time (to have a baby)? Maybe today is that day. (DEAR GOD, I HOPE NOT.)

    The point is, it’s the same set of questions that can really be applied to anything in your life that you’re kind of/sort of afraid of doing/getting on with. Good luck with everything!

    • Matt Reply

      Great point Kerri – you’ve illustrated that these questions apply to whatever might be going on in our life. When is the right time to have a baby, when is the right time to quit my job, move to another city, buy a new pair of socks. Whatever it is, it’s not all about cause and effect, it’s about choices (Full disclosure: I was going to quote The Matrix here but I’ll keep my nerdiness at bay, for now). Thanks for adding to the discussion, I hope you’ll continue to contribute to the community here over time. Cheers!

  • Jamie Reply

    I agree especially about the not settling. I had two job offers thrown at me but turned down both. Yeah, I have no job now and that means no money but I refuse to settle. I know what I’m worth and I think that makes a huge difference.

    • Matt Reply

      It does make a huge difference Jamie – and I think that companies are starting to get that. They’re realizing that we aren’t willing to take ANYTHING that comes our way – knowing you’re worth and believing in it may mean turning down some opportunities even in times of desperation, but at the end of the day, you’ll know that you haven’t settled – and ultimately – you’ll end up where you want to be.

  • Jamie Reply

    I agree especially about the not settling. I had two job offers thrown at me but turned down both. Yeah, I have no job now and that means no money but I refuse to settle. I know what I’m worth and I think that makes a huge difference.

    • Matt Reply

      It does make a huge difference Jamie – and I think that companies are starting to get that. They’re realizing that we aren’t willing to take ANYTHING that comes our way – knowing you’re worth and believing in it may mean turning down some opportunities even in times of desperation, but at the end of the day, you’ll know that you haven’t settled – and ultimately – you’ll end up where you want to be.

  • Jenny Blake Reply

    Matt – you are amazing. I think I had inklings that you had recently made major changes in your life, but didn’t realize how many all at once. Isn’t it crazy how when we get the guts to do something big, it gives us courage and crazy momentum in all these other areas too? I was grinning from ear-to-ear when I read this post – I am so happy for you, and it is awesome to see you taking such a big leap without having all of the answers in front of you. As my friend once told me, “Destiny rolls out the red carpet – you just have to take the first step.” Major kudos, and even though you don’t want this blog to turn into a journal, do keep us posted on everything. It’s inspiring!

    • Matt Reply

      Jenny – what can I say? Thanks so much for the kind words – I will definitely continue to share my story as it pans out, but not because my life is so interesting – rather because there are SO MANY other people our age going through the exact same things. It helps to be able to relate to someone else who’s ‘been there’. It’s crazy, scary, and totally awesome all at the same time – there are highs and lows, but I couldn’t be happier about where I am and where I’m heading.

  • Jenny Blake Reply

    Matt – you are amazing. I think I had inklings that you had recently made major changes in your life, but didn’t realize how many all at once. Isn’t it crazy how when we get the guts to do something big, it gives us courage and crazy momentum in all these other areas too? I was grinning from ear-to-ear when I read this post – I am so happy for you, and it is awesome to see you taking such a big leap without having all of the answers in front of you. As my friend once told me, “Destiny rolls out the red carpet – you just have to take the first step.” Major kudos, and even though you don’t want this blog to turn into a journal, do keep us posted on everything. It’s inspiring!

    • Matt Reply

      Jenny – what can I say? Thanks so much for the kind words – I will definitely continue to share my story as it pans out, but not because my life is so interesting – rather because there are SO MANY other people our age going through the exact same things. It helps to be able to relate to someone else who’s ‘been there’. It’s crazy, scary, and totally awesome all at the same time – there are highs and lows, but I couldn’t be happier about where I am and where I’m heading.

  • Mark Lewis Reply

    I can relate to this post very much. During my college years I broke free from the norm and traveled as much as I could. It was an exciting time in my life filled with change and learning around every corner. I too took financial leaps of faith and broke free from the boundaries of my self-made bubble.

    What I’d really like to point out is the effect this has had later in my life. An accident eight years ago when I was 22 resulted in my quadriplegia. Admittedly, like you, there were times of weakness but the experiences I had during my college years prepared me for such a drastic change. Instead of focusing on the past I looked to the future and saw change and learning around every corner. This was fun once before, what makes this time around any different.

    • Matt Reply

      Mark – your story is extremely inspiring – life has thrown a lot your way yet you haven’t stopped moving, stopped learning, or stopped growing, it’s a testament to your personal drive and perseverance. Traveling is something I wish I would have done more during college – and it’s something I still wish I could do today – hopefully in the not too distant future I can make that a reality and take yet another leap of faith in that direction. As you said, these life experiences are supposed to be fun – a repetitive never-ending kind of fun, no matter how hard it may seem. A positive and optimistic outlook can go a long, long way.

  • Mark Lewis Reply

    I can relate to this post very much. During my college years I broke free from the norm and traveled as much as I could. It was an exciting time in my life filled with change and learning around every corner. I too took financial leaps of faith and broke free from the boundaries of my self-made bubble.

    What I’d really like to point out is the effect this has had later in my life. An accident eight years ago when I was 22 resulted in my quadriplegia. Admittedly, like you, there were times of weakness but the experiences I had during my college years prepared me for such a drastic change. Instead of focusing on the past I looked to the future and saw change and learning around every corner. This was fun once before, what makes this time around any different.

    • Matt Reply

      Mark – your story is extremely inspiring – life has thrown a lot your way yet you haven’t stopped moving, stopped learning, or stopped growing, it’s a testament to your personal drive and perseverance. Traveling is something I wish I would have done more during college – and it’s something I still wish I could do today – hopefully in the not too distant future I can make that a reality and take yet another leap of faith in that direction. As you said, these life experiences are supposed to be fun – a repetitive never-ending kind of fun, no matter how hard it may seem. A positive and optimistic outlook can go a long, long way.

  • Maggie Reply

    Matt thank you so much for sharing this! I know we were discussing this a little bit ago and haven’t had the chance to elaborate much, but I had a feeling we were on the same page. Sometimes fear and the unknown NEEDS to be the driving force in our life to find out what we’re made of.

    I’m looking forward to hearing more about your story :-)

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks Maggie – I’ll be sure to keep you and everyone else in the loop as the story unfolds. The unknown that lies ahead is one of the most terrifying obstacles we ever have to overcome, but the greater the obstacle, the more rewarding it is to overcome. Everything up until now is only the beginning – even though I look back and feel a little old, I’m constantly reminded about how much I have in front of me – I can’t wait!

  • Maggie Reply

    Matt thank you so much for sharing this! I know we were discussing this a little bit ago and haven’t had the chance to elaborate much, but I had a feeling we were on the same page. Sometimes fear and the unknown NEEDS to be the driving force in our life to find out what we’re made of.

    I’m looking forward to hearing more about your story :-)

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks Maggie – I’ll be sure to keep you and everyone else in the loop as the story unfolds. The unknown that lies ahead is one of the most terrifying obstacles we ever have to overcome, but the greater the obstacle, the more rewarding it is to overcome. Everything up until now is only the beginning – even though I look back and feel a little old, I’m constantly reminded about how much I have in front of me – I can’t wait!

  • Teresa Basich Reply

    Well, first, congratulations. :) It sounds like you’ve had a whirlwind couple months and have found more than a job and a new home — seems like you’ve found a little bit more of yourself!

    I think leaps of faith are incredibly bold and, while I can’t see myself taking one as big as yours any time soon, I have a huge amount of respect for people who do. The risks we take offer moments that define us and teach us new things about ourselves. Thank you for practicing what you preach and being a great role model for all recent grads looking to make a big move…and, really, for anyone at any age looking to make great changes in their life.

    Good luck (and have fun!) digging into this next phase of your life!

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks for the well wishes Teresa – I have found out a LOT about myself in the past few months. If you would have asked me at the beginning of the year that this is where I would be standing in August, I would have thought you were crazy. It’s amazing how fast things start moving when you gain a little momentum.

      Am I a role model? I’m not so sure – but I will continue to lead by example, when I succeed and even when I stumble and fall – the best way to learn is to learn from one another.

  • Teresa Basich Reply

    Well, first, congratulations. :) It sounds like you’ve had a whirlwind couple months and have found more than a job and a new home — seems like you’ve found a little bit more of yourself!

    I think leaps of faith are incredibly bold and, while I can’t see myself taking one as big as yours any time soon, I have a huge amount of respect for people who do. The risks we take offer moments that define us and teach us new things about ourselves. Thank you for practicing what you preach and being a great role model for all recent grads looking to make a big move…and, really, for anyone at any age looking to make great changes in their life.

    Good luck (and have fun!) digging into this next phase of your life!

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks for the well wishes Teresa – I have found out a LOT about myself in the past few months. If you would have asked me at the beginning of the year that this is where I would be standing in August, I would have thought you were crazy. It’s amazing how fast things start moving when you gain a little momentum.

      Am I a role model? I’m not so sure – but I will continue to lead by example, when I succeed and even when I stumble and fall – the best way to learn is to learn from one another.

  • Nancy Reply

    Hey – I am 45 and going through the same thing! Creative people are going to always be looking for challenge and blank canvas to express their skills. Go for it and wish me luck on my changes as well.

  • Nancy Reply

    Hey – I am 45 and going through the same thing! Creative people are going to always be looking for challenge and blank canvas to express their skills. Go for it and wish me luck on my changes as well.

  • Marcos Salazar Reply

    Awesome blog post. Thanks for being so honest in sharing the psychological evolution that you went through to make your decisions. And congrats on listening to your inner-signals and going with what you felt was right. We often don’t do that enough. Life is all about experiences and often time people prevent themselves from experiencing all life has to offer because of fear. But the content of those experiences make up the quality of your life so why not just go for it and take the risk? You gotta take that risk…=)

    • Matt Reply

      It’s true – we often are afraid to follow what our heart tells us is best – but nine times out of 10, following your gut is the best thing to do. Fear is self-created, it’s there to hold us back, to lower our self esteem, to challenge our confidence and ability – those who are able to not ignore it, but use it as motivational fuel (tackling fuel for you Waterboy fans) will be most successful.

  • Marcos Salazar Reply

    Awesome blog post. Thanks for being so honest in sharing the psychological evolution that you went through to make your decisions. And congrats on listening to your inner-signals and going with what you felt was right. We often don’t do that enough. Life is all about experiences and often time people prevent themselves from experiencing all life has to offer because of fear. But the content of those experiences make up the quality of your life so why not just go for it and take the risk? You gotta take that risk…=)

    • Matt Reply

      It’s true – we often are afraid to follow what our heart tells us is best – but nine times out of 10, following your gut is the best thing to do. Fear is self-created, it’s there to hold us back, to lower our self esteem, to challenge our confidence and ability – those who are able to not ignore it, but use it as motivational fuel (tackling fuel for you Waterboy fans) will be most successful.

  • floreta Reply

    very insightful and thought provoking post. thank you. i applied this to my life and it gave me the nice little ‘hoorah!’ shove in the right direction as i prepare to take a leap of faith of my own.

    • Matt Reply

      I wish you luck as you look to take your own leap – I’m glad this post could give you a push in the right direction. Cheers!

  • floreta Reply

    very insightful and thought provoking post. thank you. i applied this to my life and it gave me the nice little ‘hoorah!’ shove in the right direction as i prepare to take a leap of faith of my own.

    • Matt Reply

      I wish you luck as you look to take your own leap – I’m glad this post could give you a push in the right direction. Cheers!

  • amber Reply

    I really love that you posted this, mostly because it’s always nice to know there are others out there who share the same views, experiences and philosophies in life. When I was 23, i too left a new career after one year with a corporate company where i spent day after day in a cubical. I left my small town, my world, the mental security of everyday being surrounded by all things familair. For me, I knew I had to test myself if i really wanted to face my fears and anexities and truly become the person I am meant to become. Leading up to the decision to move over 900 miles from the comfort of home, there were a lot of changes that took place in my family life and caused me to realize the impermanence of all things, change is inevitable and that life doesn’t really follow any plan blah blah, but I knew that if I wanted to venture out and change my environment I basically just had to do it. I realized there never is a right time, however, there can be a “too late”. I decided I had to put myself out there in every way emotionally, professionally, financially and just do it. I’ve had this motto since then, a quote i saw somewhere, “Jump … and develop your wings on the way down.” So I did and still am.
    It will be 2 full years in November since i moved from a small town in MD to Tampa, FL. Everyday is a challenge, I question the decision at least once a week, the economy has only gotten worse, job interviews have been slim to none and i’m waitressing in order to pay off the college degree that hangs above my computer. But usually I realize how much I have grown as a person, i’ve overcome shyness issues and learned to tune out the internal critic that lives inside and creates self-doubt, i’ve learned not to worry and stress myself to death about things i have no control over, i’ve learned not to be so controlling and to be more carefree, to enjoy the little things like reading a good book, taking my dog to the beach, hugging my boyfriend after he’s been out of town working for weeks to support us, i’ve met people i never would have if I hadn’t moved and learned the value of good friendships. And most of all i’ve leanred that it’s not easy, life that is. Just because I made the decision to move doesn’t mean overnight all my hopes and dreams will miraculously come true. I have to keep learning, take one day at a time and work for my goals. Starting a new chapter is just that, it’s a start, you gotta fill in the pages after that and we all know any good story, any great character has to overcome A LOT of conflict before the resolution.
    So would I change my spontanious choice to leave security behind in search of a new horizon …. nope.

    • Matt Reply

      Amber – thank you for sharing your story here. It’s a clear example of how much you accomplish when you start trying. My opinion? As long as your learning, your living – You only fail when you don’t try, when you tell yourself you can’t when you really can, when you let fear and doubt consume you. As long as your moving, whether it be baby steps or giant leaps of faith – as long as you keep moving forward you’ll never live the ‘what if?’ lifestyle. Thanks again – and I hope you’ll become a regular read here and share your insight and experiences in further conversations.

  • amber Reply

    I really love that you posted this, mostly because it’s always nice to know there are others out there who share the same views, experiences and philosophies in life. When I was 23, i too left a new career after one year with a corporate company where i spent day after day in a cubical. I left my small town, my world, the mental security of everyday being surrounded by all things familair. For me, I knew I had to test myself if i really wanted to face my fears and anexities and truly become the person I am meant to become. Leading up to the decision to move over 900 miles from the comfort of home, there were a lot of changes that took place in my family life and caused me to realize the impermanence of all things, change is inevitable and that life doesn’t really follow any plan blah blah, but I knew that if I wanted to venture out and change my environment I basically just had to do it. I realized there never is a right time, however, there can be a “too late”. I decided I had to put myself out there in every way emotionally, professionally, financially and just do it. I’ve had this motto since then, a quote i saw somewhere, “Jump … and develop your wings on the way down.” So I did and still am.
    It will be 2 full years in November since i moved from a small town in MD to Tampa, FL. Everyday is a challenge, I question the decision at least once a week, the economy has only gotten worse, job interviews have been slim to none and i’m waitressing in order to pay off the college degree that hangs above my computer. But usually I realize how much I have grown as a person, i’ve overcome shyness issues and learned to tune out the internal critic that lives inside and creates self-doubt, i’ve learned not to worry and stress myself to death about things i have no control over, i’ve learned not to be so controlling and to be more carefree, to enjoy the little things like reading a good book, taking my dog to the beach, hugging my boyfriend after he’s been out of town working for weeks to support us, i’ve met people i never would have if I hadn’t moved and learned the value of good friendships. And most of all i’ve leanred that it’s not easy, life that is. Just because I made the decision to move doesn’t mean overnight all my hopes and dreams will miraculously come true. I have to keep learning, take one day at a time and work for my goals. Starting a new chapter is just that, it’s a start, you gotta fill in the pages after that and we all know any good story, any great character has to overcome A LOT of conflict before the resolution.
    So would I change my spontanious choice to leave security behind in search of a new horizon …. nope.

    • Matt Reply

      Amber – thank you for sharing your story here. It’s a clear example of how much you accomplish when you start trying. My opinion? As long as your learning, your living – You only fail when you don’t try, when you tell yourself you can’t when you really can, when you let fear and doubt consume you. As long as your moving, whether it be baby steps or giant leaps of faith – as long as you keep moving forward you’ll never live the ‘what if?’ lifestyle. Thanks again – and I hope you’ll become a regular read here and share your insight and experiences in further conversations.

  • Meenal Reply

    I liked this post! I agree that the “I can’t” complex and fear of failure so often hold us back from so many things we want to do. Every single day people talk about, “one day I want to…”–but why one day? Why not today? It’s definitely easier to hold yourself back, but sometimes just taking a leap can be so rewarding. We all need a little risk here and there. :)

    • Matt Reply

      The greater the risk the greater the reward – I can say that I’m a living testament of that as we speak. I quit my job, moved here with nothing lined up – and in the past two months I’ve settled into a new city, found an amazing job, signed the lease on my first place with my fiance – life is good – I’m a long way from home, and sometimes can’t believe I’m here doing what I’m doing – but I owe it all to my own ‘screw it and just do it’ attitude. We all have that inside of us, but for some, letting it out is a hell of an obstacle to overcome.

  • Meenal Reply

    I liked this post! I agree that the “I can’t” complex and fear of failure so often hold us back from so many things we want to do. Every single day people talk about, “one day I want to…”–but why one day? Why not today? It’s definitely easier to hold yourself back, but sometimes just taking a leap can be so rewarding. We all need a little risk here and there. :)

    • Matt Reply

      The greater the risk the greater the reward – I can say that I’m a living testament of that as we speak. I quit my job, moved here with nothing lined up – and in the past two months I’ve settled into a new city, found an amazing job, signed the lease on my first place with my fiance – life is good – I’m a long way from home, and sometimes can’t believe I’m here doing what I’m doing – but I owe it all to my own ‘screw it and just do it’ attitude. We all have that inside of us, but for some, letting it out is a hell of an obstacle to overcome.

  • timoteo Reply

    Hey Matt, I felt like I was reading my own words for a minute there. I to am 23, I to quit my job in the middle of the recession and moved out to the north-end of Chicago with nothing but a suitcase and a backpack. I had this feeling that there is more to experience out there, but was being held back by fear of everything, of uncertainty. But I took a chance and went on an adventure. I stayed in Chicago for the summer and planned on staying there for a year or so, but an opportunity came up that would take me to NYC and that’s where I’ll be heading in just a few weeks. It’s something I think I would have never come across had I remained on auto-pilot, complacent with where I was career wise and personally. It took everything I had just to say, “OK, I don’t know what will happen, but it’s OK” I finally saw that sometimes you need to make opportunities instead of waiting for them. I just found your site and look forward to coming back for more. Good luck seems like the wrong thing to say here, because you’re out there making things happen. I will simply say to you, enjoy.

    • Matt Reply

      Hey Timoteo – first of all I have to say that I love your blog – very unique and love the picture/writing combination you have going on there – thanks for coming by and sharing your story here! It sounds like we are both making things happen – and that’s what life is all about, putting your foot forward, one step at a time, even when people are telling you not to. I will say good luck to you with your upcoming move – it sounds like you have the right attitude – and with that, I have no doubt you’ll find success. Cheers!

  • timoteo Reply

    Hey Matt, I felt like I was reading my own words for a minute there. I to am 23, I to quit my job in the middle of the recession and moved out to the north-end of Chicago with nothing but a suitcase and a backpack. I had this feeling that there is more to experience out there, but was being held back by fear of everything, of uncertainty. But I took a chance and went on an adventure. I stayed in Chicago for the summer and planned on staying there for a year or so, but an opportunity came up that would take me to NYC and that’s where I’ll be heading in just a few weeks. It’s something I think I would have never come across had I remained on auto-pilot, complacent with where I was career wise and personally. It took everything I had just to say, “OK, I don’t know what will happen, but it’s OK” I finally saw that sometimes you need to make opportunities instead of waiting for them. I just found your site and look forward to coming back for more. Good luck seems like the wrong thing to say here, because you’re out there making things happen. I will simply say to you, enjoy.

    • Matt Reply

      Hey Timoteo – first of all I have to say that I love your blog – very unique and love the picture/writing combination you have going on there – thanks for coming by and sharing your story here! It sounds like we are both making things happen – and that’s what life is all about, putting your foot forward, one step at a time, even when people are telling you not to. I will say good luck to you with your upcoming move – it sounds like you have the right attitude – and with that, I have no doubt you’ll find success. Cheers!

  • Cheryl Elizaga Reply

    I love your blog, Matt! Why did it take me this long to find it? Not only can I relate to the topics you blog about, but your layout is so aesthetically pleasing, as well!

    This post definitely caught my eye. As a 22-year-old going on 23 in a few months, I was surprised to see that we’re about the same age. You have this je ne sais quoi (sp?) about your writing that is so personable yet professional.

    Anyway, this post somewhat reminds me of the movie ‘Yes Man’ with Jim Carrey. Although I’m not so much a fan of Mr. Carrey’s obnoxious humor, that humor didn’t play out so much in this movie. Instead, the story was all about taking chances and saying “Yes!” to every proposal to show how far you could go with a positive mindset. I see you as that ‘Yes Man’ now, taking the chance to move to Chicago without any promises to hold onto. Money (or the lack thereof) is definitely a huge excuse for me – and perhaps many others – not to follow through with my dreams, but even when I have good friends proposing cheap and free alternatives I still find myself shooting their proposals down.

    Like you said, YOU are the only person holding yourself back. I have this post-it pinned to my corkboard that screams: “KEEP MOVING FORWARD!” It’s a not-so-subtle reminder that despite all the rejection and complacency I’ve endured as a recent graduate, I seriously need to get off my butt and conquer the world.

    :) Thank you, and good luck in Chicago!

    Cheryl
    @CheElizaga

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi Cheryl. I’m not sure why it took so long for you to find it – maybe i need to do a better job of getting the word out there? Regardless – I’m glad you did! I genuinely appreciate your kind words and accolades and I’m glad this post ‘hit home’ with you.

      I can now look back on this and say that this leap of faith was all worth it – It was stressful, it was hard, it nearly broke me down – but here I am in a new city with a new job (which I love), about to move into my new place. It’s amazing how fast things move when you actually start moving. Living in Nashville, worrying about moving up here – seems like so long ago. This blog has been about much more than my personal journey – but it’s fulfilling for me to go back and read about my fears and doubts and how they motivated me to where I am today.

      Thanks again – here’s wishing you well in conquering your own life, one step at a time!

  • Cheryl Elizaga Reply

    I love your blog, Matt! Why did it take me this long to find it? Not only can I relate to the topics you blog about, but your layout is so aesthetically pleasing, as well!

    This post definitely caught my eye. As a 22-year-old going on 23 in a few months, I was surprised to see that we’re about the same age. You have this je ne sais quoi (sp?) about your writing that is so personable yet professional.

    Anyway, this post somewhat reminds me of the movie ‘Yes Man’ with Jim Carrey. Although I’m not so much a fan of Mr. Carrey’s obnoxious humor, that humor didn’t play out so much in this movie. Instead, the story was all about taking chances and saying “Yes!” to every proposal to show how far you could go with a positive mindset. I see you as that ‘Yes Man’ now, taking the chance to move to Chicago without any promises to hold onto. Money (or the lack thereof) is definitely a huge excuse for me – and perhaps many others – not to follow through with my dreams, but even when I have good friends proposing cheap and free alternatives I still find myself shooting their proposals down.

    Like you said, YOU are the only person holding yourself back. I have this post-it pinned to my corkboard that screams: “KEEP MOVING FORWARD!” It’s a not-so-subtle reminder that despite all the rejection and complacency I’ve endured as a recent graduate, I seriously need to get off my butt and conquer the world.

    :) Thank you, and good luck in Chicago!

    Cheryl
    @CheElizaga

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi Cheryl. I’m not sure why it took so long for you to find it – maybe i need to do a better job of getting the word out there? Regardless – I’m glad you did! I genuinely appreciate your kind words and accolades and I’m glad this post ‘hit home’ with you.

      I can now look back on this and say that this leap of faith was all worth it – It was stressful, it was hard, it nearly broke me down – but here I am in a new city with a new job (which I love), about to move into my new place. It’s amazing how fast things move when you actually start moving. Living in Nashville, worrying about moving up here – seems like so long ago. This blog has been about much more than my personal journey – but it’s fulfilling for me to go back and read about my fears and doubts and how they motivated me to where I am today.

      Thanks again – here’s wishing you well in conquering your own life, one step at a time!

  • Wheels Myrand Reply

    I was very inspired by this article.u00a0 A long time college friend of mine and I are planning to move to Chicago when his lease runs out in five months.u00a0 We both are employed in Michigan right now, but in about two months, we won’t be.u00a0 We’re attempted to search for jobs in the Chicago area now, as well as housing, but I fear we will not find anything in time.u00a0 What makes it harder is I am confined to a wheelchair, so housing and job options are limited.u00a0u00a0 This post gives me hope though, that even if we find nothing by then, we’ll still be o.k.u00a0 Thanks, Matt.u00a0 Wish us luck.

  • Nicole Reid Reply

    I did the same thing when I was 25. I picked up from Buffalo NY and moved to DC with $2000 and a badly behaved dog. No job, no friends, no family in the area. It’s now 11 years later and I am finding myself asking the question again – is it time to go? Things look a little different at age 36. I make more money, I have friends in the area now, and I have a better behaved dog. But I’m starting to wonder, “Is this all there is?” DC is a pretty corporate town and it’s starting to feel like all I do is work. Can’t even remember what I used to do for fun. Good luck to everyone on the journey. Wish me luck in shaking things up a bit. Cheers !

  • Adeyemi Reply

    A big thumbs up goes to my great writer,you’ve make the right choice but to me though i did same by leaving my parent at the age of 21 and here i am still battling with how well is going to be good for me but all look twisted up but i pray its ends well because i’m fed up…

  • Roy Emerson Reply

    This is what I really needed to read today! I moved to China to teach oral English in January of 2012 and two months in I regretted it, but chalked it up to my employer, so after that contract finished in the end of August 2012, I found a new one. Things didn’t change, this contract at my second employer will end in 3 months and 3 weeks, which is just about the time that you need to start signing contracts for next semester. I get offered the perfect job (or so I thought). This job has the right pay, location, schedule, and level of students that I am looking for, BUT they want me to do something illegal to get my visa from the govt. Thousands of foreigners in China have done this and gotten away with it, but I am not one of them. For a month I sat on my hands with mixed emotions, feeling terrible, scared, yet excited for this new job. Finally I talked to my friend on Facebook this morning and she really set my mind at ease, right after I saw this page. Coincidence? Either way, I have decided that it is safer and that I can’t lie to the government, even if I never get caught. I would still know everyday and every night, wondering if I was going to get caught. I can’t live like that! The sad part is that so many employers here want us to lie to get our visa. I have decided that it is best to come back to USA at the end of this current contract, but I won’t have a lot of money given the currency exchange rate and the cost of a flight from China to upstate New York. I guess you could say that I am making a leap of faith, but at least I am doing it with a clear conscience.

  • Victoria Reply

    I needed to read this and forwarded the link to my boyfriend. I’ve been battling my own Insecurities about moving from tx to Chicago without a job lined up. My parents are move supportive of the idea than expected but I am afraid. Thanks for sharing this and giving me hope that this crazy idea and dream could actually be one of the greatest decisions I could make for myself.

  • Patrick Engman Reply

    I’m glad I stumbled across this while searching on Google! It seems you’ve chalked up the majority of the emotions and worries that I am feeling now!

    I will be 25 in June and I still feel like a wondering child. I think that’s a good thing, though. In August, I plan on moving to Chicago to pursue my photography career.

    I have no job lined up, I’m looking into renting a room in Logan Square and the only amount of money that will keep my head above water will be from selling my car for who know’s how much.

    I’m so damn excited and worried at the same time. I want to succeed but I also want to make sure I’m living a happy lifestyle. This is all new to me and I’ve never lived in a big city.

    You’ve got yourself another reader. :) I feel motivated and ready to live the dream!

  • Warren Foster Reply

    Matt
    On How I Stopped Holding Myself Back. You have empowered me. I have had a tough three years from losing the one I love to cancer and losing my last dollar to health costs for that person. Which I would do all over again.
    However here I sat reading this article and my dream has always been to live in Chicago, but life has taken me other places. Thanks to you I am going to live that dream with a lot of skill and a little money you have inspired me and Matt i’m not in my 20′s im in my 50′s Thank you my friend

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    • Susanne Reply

      Warren. Good luck to you and best wishes. I am 50 as well and ready to start over in a new city. Choking to death in a miserable job with each day ticking by. Preparing for a massive change.
      Godspeed, bud.

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  • Allison Ivy Reply

    Question for you: Had you not been engaged, or had any love interest for that matter, would you have still made this move? If so, how would it have been different?

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  • Rom Reply

    Reading this was quite an experience for me. I hope, with all my heart, none of you will have this experience at age 56, like me. When you hear: ‘Save your money for a rainy day’…listen and do it. I remember when I was 23 I had the world by the tale and nothing could stop me. Much has changed; and now I’m hated because of my age and not appreciated because of experience. My experience has been replaced with- “we do it our way and we don’t give a shit what you know”. I hate saying ‘good luck’….pray that God will open the doors, smooth your path, reveal things to you that you need, and keep you safe until you meet with Him for all eternity. Eternity is a long, long time. Find Christ.

  • Siha Gnet Reply

    That’s a remarkable story you gave with great words of encouragement! I am 24 and moving from Chicago to Denver in about three weeks with no solid “job(s)” besides pure aspiration to widen my multimedia business in the new city. Chicago was great to me for all 24 years. I produced a lot of work in this awesome city so it will be a healthy challenge to transition to a more intimate/smaller city, even though I won’t know what to expect, the excitement, ambition, and thrill is helping me feel more alive than ever. Denver has stolen my heart mostly because of its beauty and people, with growing industries worth tapping into!

    Anyway, I love that your general message is that we can all live our dream and be the remarkable person we can be right now! There really isn’t any excuse to not start living a life of prosperity. I genuinely believe that everyone deserves a healthy and happy life. I also believe that with our natural attractions to things we care about, the universe has a way to unveil itself to us as long as we stay committed and continue to attract the life we aim to have. Sooner or later we live it and we won’t even realize it. Your quite the inspiration so please continue your journey to inspire more people.

    Good luck and continue to produce content that motivates people to thrive for success and happiness!

  • Josh Reply

    I am going through the exact same thing right now! I am from ATL and (against my better judgment) just put in my two-weeks notice for a perfectly fine job. By “fine” I mean it paid the bills and allowed me to save, but after two years of working there it was clear this job was not taking me anywhere else professionally.
    I am now moving to Chicago with my fiancée in a few weeks. Neither of us have a job just yet. I am curious how you handled looking for an apartment and rent when you taking your big jump.

  • james mollo Reply

    i want to leave Seattle badly the weather is bad for my sinus infection and i cant find work here i am 46 in great shape i have done this recently and failed my only problem is the 3 week wait to get paid how can i live with no money for 3 weeks how can i pay rent i have a food card so thats ok i can go to the gym for a daily work out and shower and i guess i could put my stuff in storage but were to live until i get my first check most companys dont pay daily any more no cash its tough ant suggestions

  • Jason Foust Reply

    Thank you, I needed to read this today… I’m in that boat even though I don’t won’t to accept it! lol it’s a breath of inspiration because its easy to get caught up in fear and discouragement… I have just returned to Nashville with very little money or contacts… Part of me says, persevere! and part of me says run home while I still have the chance… There’s nothing back ‘home’ though! Thanks

  • Brandy Reply

    I am not new to looking for inspiration through other’s personal blogs, but I must say that this is the first time that I felt compelled to comment. You are truly an inspiration young lady. You make many valid points about our generation. I have landed myself into some pretty shaky positions as a Graphic Designer fresh out of college. I often ask myself, is it me? I am realizing that I am settling for less than I am worth. Not to mention, I am ready to move on to bigger and better things. My boyfriend and I have been “planning” a move for two years. You would think, by now, that we would be well on our way. However, that is definitely not the case. We have sunk deep into a state of fear and depression the closer we get to our anticipated moving date. We both find ourselves questioning everything we do and say.
    At this point, I am really starting to feel like we will never get out of here. I think the reality that we can’t grasp is that we have to stop thinking and start doing. There is no turning back and at 27 and 32 with no children, we have ample opportunity. I applaud you for making the move and thank you for your words of comfort and inspiration. I have never been as affected by some one else’s words until this morning. I had to forward this post to my boyfriend so that he could see we aren’t the only ones in the world feeling stuck. THANK YOU!

  • Grizzly907LA Reply

    So its all about knowing the right people instead of working hard, being responsible and good at the profession your in? So much for the meritocracy. I am sure being a faceman or a jock is good way to get in with the right people too? No wonder why this country is circling the drain. People no longer obtain their positions through good grades in school when starting out or through hard work, responsibility, and competence if you have been in your profession for a while. It’s about superficial charm and smoozing with the right people. Disgusting!!!!

    • Alexis Mercado Reply

      I think you misunderstood the concept of this article. It’s not to degrade your way of life it’s to show people that it isn’t the ONLY way to live. Don’t be so sour.

      • Grizzly907LA Reply

        I am not criticizing you. I am criticizing what our country has become. We’ve gotten away from solid concepts like hard work, merit, competence, innovation, and have embraced concepts like patronage, having an “in,” and similar things that require superficial charm and charisma. My dad was a WWII vet and got a job because of his knowledge, and military service. He started out in a slightly lower position than his knowledge base but was able to prove himself through hard work, merit and competence. Its extremely difficult to get a job like that nowadays unless you know someone or your the bosses nephew.

        You did what you needed to do and I don’t begrudge you for that. What’s happened to this country in the last twenty years pisses me off.

  • Codith Reply

    Man oh man….. talking about idolizing one that has walked in my shoes. I’m not sure if you even respond on here anymore. But I’m currently moving from West Virginia to Michigan to be with my 7/mo daughter, never have I lived outside of my grandparents roof other than two times, even then.. I was near my security zone. There is nothing here in this place, and when I say there are no jobs, I really mean it and the sustainability of happiness here for anyone is near slim to none. I am 24 years old, with $2,000.00 in my pocket, I found a place is Michigan to live but it’s going to take out quite a chunk of that money, but it’s worth it, right? Start with a roof over my head, next is to find a job etc. After I read this, I realized that I can do it..and that I’m not alone. I just wanted to thank you man, thank you for showing those of us who have struggled with the “take a leap of faith” movement. Some of us are afraid to take chances, but look at you, you was in the same situation and turned it around completely. Kudos brother, kudos.

  • Alexis Mercado Reply

    I am lost. That’s the best way to put it. I’m 20 years old with only a high school education. I have tried college- multiple times- and just couldn’t make it stick. I felt lost and like I was wasting my time. I didn’t want to spend more time behind closed doors, I just wanted to see new things and live in different ways. Unfortunately, I have been told that if I don’t go to college I will fail to live. I have been told college is my ONLY answer. Although I’m not exactly who you are in this article it helps to hear it’s okay to take risks. I just like knowing it’s MY choice. Thank you for that.

    • Grizzly907LA Reply

      Dear Alexis

      Whoever told you that is full of crap!!! I want to strangle people when I hear them tell a kid “that you won’t succeed if you don’t go to college.” There are so many jobs in this country that don’t require a college degree. I am grudgingly going to school for a nursing degree, because there is no other way to do it sadly. Going to college for most kids these days is a waste of time and money. You will get a worthless degree and a lifetime of student loan debt if you go to college. Here’s a link to a documentary that spells all of that out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3oVfefdGc8

      If anything I would recommend you go to a community college, check into their trade skills as well as take an English class that will help you properly write papers, structure them etc. Trust me that will come in handy. This country is hurting for people that have trade skills like welding, electrician work, automotive repair, Electronics, Computer repair etc. If you don’t want to do that I suggest enlisting in the military and enlist in either the Air Force or Navy if your adverse to possibly facing a combat situation. It would even be a good idea for you to enlist in the National Guard or Reserves. If anything you will figure out what you don’t want to do. You can get technical and other in demand skills without going to college if your score high enough on the ASVAB, however they have your ass for as long as your contract states. Who knows you may even make the military a career, or decide that you want to go to college after you get out.

      Those are not the only options out there, but I hope that gives you something to chew on. You can even go to a junior college to build “infrastructure skills,” like being to write clearly and effectively, properly use a computer, be able to speak in front of people effectively or even learn a second language. Not everyone needs or deserves a college degree (I am not referring to you. I am speaking in general.) I know many people with bachelor degrees who are as dumb as a bag of rocks. My dad referred to them as educated idiots. Find something you have an intense passion for and pursue that. Do some research and don’t give up, and whatever you do don’t let them fill your head with that “you won’t succeed without a college degree,” pap.

  • Big D Reply

    is so weird..I Googled ” Should I take the new job offer with the doubled salary or stay put in the easiest job I have ever had” and I showed up hear.. Well, feel free to give me the opinions… I sent out a resume two weeks ago to a job posting and within days I have an offer for employment..get this in the same building different group/company.. When it came to salary the set range was double from what i currently make..huge !! Now I am not sure I want the job because allot of the people who I know from passing by out in the parking lot, hallways etc..are jerks, backstabbers, bad mouth everything that breathes and I would as a contractor have to work under one of them..(person would assign workload).. Same person when found out I got offered the job tried to talk me out of it and then in the same conversation suggested his friend would be better in my supervisor position than myself..the friend got hired as well but, he will report to myself..I am getting the feeling that my life is going to go from easiest job with no stress (I am pretty much the boss currently) to a huge paying job if I accept it, with drama, stressed filled days of having the guy I have to report to trying to get me fired in order to have his bubby get in my position..Now I am starting to think I should walk away from it and stay where I am currently..I think I am going to blow an opportunity of a lifetime..”scared to death” Don’t know what to do..I don’t want to possibly live each day in a new job sweating every second..and really I don’t even know for sure this guy will do anything to me at all..I just have a feeling in the pit of my stomach that I am going to be unemployed in 6 months…and regret taking it , lose my home and everything else because I have very little in the bank .. if that happens.. What to do ? I have not given my notice as of yet but, will have to make a decision this week…people depend on me and I am so scared I will make the wrong decision…..open for constructive comments…

  • maria smith Reply

    HI my name MARIA SMITH AM FROM Ottawa, Canada i want you all to hellp me in thanking DR okpoko who help me with my problems. My husband and i have been married for eight years now ,we live happily as good couples until a friend of mine cast a spell on my husband. he abandoned me and the family, he didn’t even want to see me at all because he was under a spell. it was now getting to six months since my husband abandoned me and i was frustrated and don’t know what to do until i meet this great spell caster on line, I tell him my problems and he give me four days assurance that he will come back to me. He help me break the spell that was caste on my husband and to my greatest surprise the fourth day my husband came knocking on my door and beg me for forgiveness. once again thank you DR Okpoko you can also contact him through his mail (dr.okpokospellhome@gmail.com)

    • Big D Reply

      And I was under the impression this was a serious forum for positive open discussion. Matt should take some time out of his week and clear out the escaped wackos rants….Or he rename this site Hobwart Harry Potter forum……

      • Grizzly907 Reply

        @Big D So a wacko rant is any rant that you don’t agree with? You need to come up with a better argument than that. Big D never breed because ignorance reproduces.

        • Big D Reply

          teddybear,
          Attack, attack and attack … Oh, teddybear you are so scary…… or is it hairy bitch who loves little boys….you go by online…..nowadays …well time to move on I don’t associate with sick old filthy scumbags like you little cub

          • Grizzly907la Reply

            For your sake pray that we never meet in real life because you will be eating through a straw for awhile at the very least.

  • Lindan Reply

    I needed this as a reminder. I got approved for an apartment put in my two weeks notice and moved at the end of 3 weeks to a town I had only visited twice in my life. Both of those visits totaled less than 24 hours. I had no job lined up, but found work in about 6 weeks. Now almost a year later I’m working a graphic design job again. This week I’ve started planning my next move, to Chicago. I don’t plan on moving realistically for another 18 months. I started contacting apartment complexes to get in idea of the areas I’m looking within Chicago and in suburbs. I’ve researched crime rates as well. One place has already made an amazing impression on me. Now I feel I just need to work on my portfolio so I can way places. The thought of looking for work again is all I’m dreading.

  • Sara Reply

    Love this- it’s funny because I am actually 33 but I’ve lived in the same town for 10 years, same job for almost 9! Might as well be 23! I’m moving a few states away to be closer to my boyfriend of 5 years who just recently left to go back to school-and I just can’t get passed being so scared of money avd security, so I have been holding off-such great advice about networking here. I’ve been looking at all kinds of info online, craigslist and such- but not throwing anything out there, just looking through the window. Thanks for such great advice.

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  • Lexie Reply

    Matt,

    I’m really happy that you wrote this mainly because this is such an under-represented way of looking at life. If you are a go-getter, and you know you can do these things, it’s so hard when other people make you feel like an alien. Hate it.

    I had moved to NYC and worked a temp job that paid very well. After trying for other jobs and a new apartment at the same time, it fell apart. I’m thinking of trying again but this time in a cheaper part of LA with a more permanent living situation. I’m thinking the living situation part might be harder than just finding a whatever paying job, and I’m hoping I’m right about that. Who knows! I know atleast that I’ve set an absolute deadline on this comfort life and I’ve only got a couple months no matter what til it’s go time! :]

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    I have to keep you updated because I’m simply AMAZED at the results of this spell you performed for me. Everything is going so well and EXACTLY how you said it would be. Even though it took 5 months to fully progress, it was so worth it because things are just about at perfection! How you took my situation and completely turned it around to give me exactly what I wanted is beyond me, but something I will never question and just be completely grateful for coming across you. Bless you for helping so many people get what their heart desires. You truly gifted! . you can also contact him for help as well (arigbospelltemple@gmail. com)

  • peter Reply

    this describes my current situation in ways that im almost scared!!! im 23 living in a city i absolutely HATE!!!lived and went to school in Chicago right after high school some things didn’t work out,sooooo back to milSHITTY(milwaukee if your wondering)So a couple years latter and a trilogy of family deaths that follwed soon after my departure from my dream city(one including my mom)I was mentally incipasitated and now regaing my true mental state!! i really hope to see how this played out for you! so please update us on some more!!! :)

  • Kate Reply

    Thank you for this article as it helped solidify my decision! I am 26 and my husband and I live in the town where I grew up. The Illinois environment for teachers is HORRIBLE and to top it off, his school lost funding for his current part-time teaching position.
    We both hate winter and knew that we wanted to move South. So, we’re doing it. He’s finishing up the school year, and I’m job searching. We’re moving down whether or not we have jobs yet. Luckily, my dad lives in Austin and we have a place to stay but this is still a huge leap of faith as I am not the type of person that is OK with that uncertainty. But I know that anything in life worth doing isn’t going to be easy.

  • scratch map Reply

    Thank you, I needed to read this today… I’m in that boat even though I don’t won’t to accept it! lol it’s a breath of inspiration because its easy to get caught up in fear and discouragement… I have just returned to Nashville with very little money or contacts… Part of me says, persevere! and part of me says run home while I still have the chance… There’s nothing back ‘home’ though! Thanks

  • shannon Reply

    My name is shannon, i want to share this great testimony of my life to
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  • Vera Morgan Reply

    I have just found the right one and the greatest spell caster on earth who has brought back my happiness and turned my world around by helping me get my ex partner and helped get back my life cause i was totally frustrated after 6years of hardship and pain, a friend of mine buzz me on my email saying i should cheer up cause solution has come. At first i was like what are you saying, then she mentioned the name ‘EBOEHI’ and i must thank my savior Great DR EBOEHI who has play a very vital part of my life making me a great person and the most happiest person today you are a great man who is bless by powers with traditional healing spell caster, after Great DR EBOEHI has help me get my ex back he also help me recover what i have lost in past years i must thank him (Great DR EBOEHI) the life he has restored back for me and my happiness. Now i am doing well in my work and also with my partner, Great DR EBOEHI is a very great spell caster you need to know just meet him and with your problem and it will be over.. Email him via: (supernaturalspelltemple@gmail. com)

  • Brinelis Rodriguez Reply

    I’m so glad I found this today. I’m 25 and just recently got laid off from a job I loved at an ad agency here in Puerto Rico. I’d been thinking about moving to San Fran or NYC for a while now but never got to doing it and I feel I should take this negative situation and use it as motivation for the big move. However, I’m broke and scared shitless of the thought of moving to such a big city where I know almost no one without a job lined up and no money. This post really helped to lift my spirits and motivate me to take the leap and move.

    Thanks for your words!

    xx, Bri

  • Carolyn Reply

    I literally googled “feeling scared about looking for first job” and found this article, and when my eyes hit “23…Nashville” a little imaginary halo popped up on top of my monitor and tears were in my eyes. I thought, “I’m 24. I’m from Nashville. I have one year of ‘real world’ experience that, frankly, has left me feeling like I haven’t learned nearly enough as I should have”. I’m moving to San Francisco with barely enough to survive a month, and I’m absolutely terrified – no, petrified – that I won’t find a job or be able to sustain myself out there. On top of all of that is feeling like I’m actually not good enough to find a job.

    Just, thank you for writing this.

    • Carrie Reply

      Carolyn,

      This is like WOW!!!! San Francisco is one of the places that I would like to live in. Your situation sounds like mine financially. I also feel the same way about the job, as well. Would you please let me know how you are doing and how you are progressing? I am really hoping for you. Thank you for sharing.

    • Carrie Reply

      Carolyn,

      I am so glad that I read your post today. San Francisco is one of the places that I would like to move to. I am in the same boat with finances and also self esteem about the whole job thing. I would really appreciate it if you would keep me posted of your progress on here. I am hoping for you and also I want to tell you that you are a very courageous person. I hope that San Francisco is as you dream it to be. I wish you all the best!!!!!!!

  • Carrie Reply

    Matt,

    I am so glad that you have shared your experience here with us. I am in a situation myself right now where I want to relocate to a big city and get out of this little town I live in. My husband doe not want to relocate. However, unlike me, he can get job practically anywhere in the United States he wants to because he works with a company that he can transfer with. I have been mostly a Mother and a Homemaker all of my life with little education and little work experience. I want so much to branch out there an broaden my horizons. I know there are many opportunities out there and having depression I know that the big city would definitely boost my morale. I have already done my research about the places I would like to live. My problem, unlike my husband’s is, no education and no job which means little if any resources. I do have some marketable skills but with this competitive job market and world I am very scared to chance it, although I just know deep inside I would be happier living somewhere else, cause I would have a better quality of life. But, realistically I know I also have to be able to pay my bills and my day to day living. I sure would appreciate any advice or suggestions you may have for me. I am curious Matt, how are you doing? How is life treating you today? I hope that you are well and that your life is like you want it to be.

  • joes candra Reply

    I am joes candra, I promise to share this testimony all over the world once my boyfriend return back to me, and today with all due respect i want to thank DR.awewefor bringing joy and happiness to my relationship and my family. I want to inform you all that there is a spell caster that is real and genuine. I never believed in any of these things until i loosed my boyfriend, I required help until i found a grate spell caster, And he cast a love spell for me, and he assured me that I will get my boyfriend back in two days after the spell has been cast. Three days later, my phone rang, and so shockingly, it was my boyfriend who has not called me for past 6 years now, and made an apology for the heart break, and told me that he is ready to be my back bone till the rest of his life with me. DR.awewe released him up to know how much i loved and wanted him. And opened his eyes to picture how much we have share together. As I`m writing this testimony right now I`m the most happiest girl on earth and me and my boyfriend is living a happy life and our love is now stronger than how it were even before our break up. So that`s why I promised to share my testimony all over the universe.All thanks goes to DR.awewe for the excessive work that he has done for me. Below is the email address in any situation you are undergoing a heart break, and I assure you that as he has done mine for me, he will definitely help you too.awewespelltempl

  • joes candra Reply

    I am joes candra, I promise to share this testimony all over the world once my boyfriend return back to me, and today with all due respect i want to thank DR.awewefor bringing joy and happiness to my relationship and my family. I want to inform you all that there is a spell caster that is real and genuine. I never believed in any of these things until i loosed my boyfriend, I required help until i found a grate spell caster, And he cast a love spell for me, and he assured me that I will get my boyfriend back in two days after the spell has been cast. Three days later, my phone rang, and so shockingly, it was my boyfriend who has not called me for past 6 years now, and made an apology for the heart break, and told me that he is ready to be my back bone till the rest of his life with me. DR.awewe released him up to know how much i loved and wanted him. And opened his eyes to picture how much we have share together. As I`m writing this testimony right now I`m the most happiest girl on earth and me and my boyfriend is living a happy life and our love is now stronger than how it were even before our break up. So that`s why I promised to share my testimony all over the universe.All thanks goes to DR.awewe for the excessive work that he has done for me. Below is the email address in any situation you are undergoing a heart break, and I assure you that as he has done mine for me, he will definitely help you too.awewespelltemple

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    I have had random odd jobs since I graduated from college. I am 27 years old and unemployed with less than $500 dollars in my account. I was diagnosed with Epilepsy 2 years ago and it has damaged my self-esteem and confidence. Employers seem to not have an interest in hiring someone who can have spontaneous seizures. I also can no longer drive which doesn’t help me either. I am so embarrassed and I feel useless out there in the world. I have had so many great interviews and about 99% of the time I will not get an email or a phone call back. It’s frustrating. I would love to just pack up all my things and move to a new place, but it is a risk I am not willing to take.

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