Nobody Likes A Quitter

Nobody Likes A Quitter

To quit or not to quit? That is the question

Lately around the blogosphere – there has been a lot of discussion about quitting your job – and there are clearly two very opposite thought processes here. One says you’ll learn everything you need to about a company within the first couple weeks of employment. Others will tell you to wait it out, suck it up, and gain experience. What’s the right thing to do – what should YOU do? Are you currently at the intersection of corporate vs. startup lifestyles not knowing where to turn? It may feel great to pack your bags and say good riddance to structure and conformity, but maybe, just maybe, you should think about the marathon before breaking out into a sprint.

Giving up too soon

Two weeks is not enough time to judge if you’re a fit with a company. You may have a basic feel of the way things are done, but nine times out of ten you haven’t even begun to tap into the position you were hired for. After a few months, you should have a better idea and you can tell whether or not you’ll fit into the culture of the company. Does that mean you should automatically quit if you don’t immediately fall in love with your job? Not at all. Have you looked inward and though ‘maybe it’s not the company, maybe it’s my own state of mind that is inhibiting my success’. Try harder, stick with it, learn from it. If all else fails, you’ll be gaining valuable experience and will be maintaining a steady income.

You invest in them, and they’ll invest in you

The commitment one makes when accepting a job offer is something that is widely discounted overlooked. Think about how hard you worked just to score an interview. You made it through a stack of other resumes – you got through the interview process – the commitment between company and employee is mutual. Maybe the company hasn’t provided a realistic outlook of what the job entails, or maybe your lack of commitment is getting in the way of success. Whatever the case, it’s important to remember that a job is more than a job, it’s a commitment. You have invested your time and effort into the company, and they are in turn trusting you to be efficient and productive – they’re investing in you every couple weeks when you get a paycheck handed to you. Eva makes an outstanding point in her post when she says “A high performer might be able to switch jobs often, but those worth the title do not. Instead, they are committed to the company that has committed to them”.

Stop worrying and start learning

You might hate your job with a passion – but later in life you’ll value the experience you received. Learn something. Maybe it’s realizing what you’re good at – or maybe it’s figuring out what you don’t want to do in life and the right and wrong way to do business. Every experience, both good and bad, will help you grow, it will help shape you and mold you as you continue on your career path. Generation-Y gets a bad rep because of our sense of ‘entitlement‘. We (very early on) will start to think we’re smarter than our supervisors and bosses. Highly doubtful we’re smarter than our counterparts with years of experience on us – rather, more times than not it’s as simple as having a different perspective and core philosophy. It’s important to understand that there is more than one way to run a business – look inward, soak up the knowledge, and use it for your own future benefit.

Getting laid and getting paid

Jumping from job to job may introduce you to a wide array of experience and techniques – but what’s the number one thing employers are looking for? Someone who has shown commitment in their past experiences, both personal and professional. I was asked during the interview for my current position to describe my greatest accomplishment; a pretty intense, in your face question that put me on the spot. I felt my hands tense up, not knowing what to say – only one thing came to mind, so I started talking. I told them story of how I met my girlfriend, how much it had changed me (for the better). I talked about my relationship making me a humble and compassionate person, and explained the commitment and dedication involved in maintaining a successful relationship.

They weren’t asking for relationship advice – it probably wasn’t the answer they were looking for or even hoping for. But it was a clear real-life example showcasing my own reliability, consistency, and commitment: Three things that all employers want in bringing on a new staff member. It was a ‘human’ response, and these ‘real life’ examples may be all you have as you initially enter into the job market – but moving forward, you’ll need professional examples to add credibility. Nothing looks worse that a resume with 7 different 2-month tenures of past work experience. You may not love your job, but odds are, it will benefit you over the long haul. The bottom line, employers want someone they can count on – someone that won’t give up at the first sign of adversity.

An open mind will get you far

In a community full of entrepreneurs and innovative thinkers, why would you listen to someone who is (basically) telling you to suck it up and pay your dues? I want to start up my own company as much as the next guy – but with that said, make the best of every situation, as trying as it may be – I guarantee every work experience will help you learn and grow as an individual. While it may feel good to be liberated and free, there is a lot to be said for a person who shows commitment and poise, even through adversity. Who knows, maybe you’ll prove to yourself that your initial judgement was wrong. Don’t lose track of what you want and where you want to be in life, but don’t be afraid to face inconvenience and difficulty with an open mind and your chin held high. Continue to learn and in the end, you’ll end up exactly where you want to be.


29 Responses
  • JR Moreau Reply

    All of these points are very well put together. It does pay to show some determination and grit when faced with a less than ideal situation.

    Then again, putting up with a bad situation without having an exit strategy for the sake of loyalty is simply foolish in my opinion. Knowing when enough is enough is important so you can move along without getting burnt out, bitter or even fired.

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks for the comment JR. You make a good point in that, while quitting prematurely is not good practice, neither is sticking with something you hate for the sake of loyalty. It’s important to know when the right time to move on is.

      I think sometimes our sense of entitlement can get in the way of reality. It might feel great to quit and move past something that isn’t working well, but do you want to be out on the streets with no money? You have to be smart – and most importantly, you have to realize that even the bad experiences are still EXPERIENCES. You’ll learn and grow from it. Hate your boss? Great, you’ll learn what kind of leader NOT to be once you’re launching a startup. My point is that, rather than hanging your head and dreading every single day – keep and open mind, learn and grow. No one said you can’t look for a different (better) job in the process, but take the experience for what it’s worth in the meantime. Don’t discount the value of experience.

  • JR Moreau Reply

    All of these points are very well put together. It does pay to show some determination and grit when faced with a less than ideal situation.

    Then again, putting up with a bad situation without having an exit strategy for the sake of loyalty is simply foolish in my opinion. Knowing when enough is enough is important so you can move along without getting burnt out, bitter or even fired.

    • Matt Reply

      Thanks for the comment JR. You make a good point in that, while quitting prematurely is not good practice, neither is sticking with something you hate for the sake of loyalty. It’s important to know when the right time to move on is.

      I think sometimes our sense of entitlement can get in the way of reality. It might feel great to quit and move past something that isn’t working well, but do you want to be out on the streets with no money? You have to be smart – and most importantly, you have to realize that even the bad experiences are still EXPERIENCES. You’ll learn and grow from it. Hate your boss? Great, you’ll learn what kind of leader NOT to be once you’re launching a startup. My point is that, rather than hanging your head and dreading every single day – keep and open mind, learn and grow. No one said you can’t look for a different (better) job in the process, but take the experience for what it’s worth in the meantime. Don’t discount the value of experience.

  • Jamie Reply

    You make great points. However, you should check out “The Dip” by Seth Godin.

    Staying because you don’t want to quit is foolish, in my opinion. There is no need to show loyalty to a company that isn’t worth giving loyalty to.

    Eventually, you’re going to quit your job and whether you stay for 6 months or 1 year or 10 years, you’re still a quitter.

    Most of what you wrote about here are your own personal values, which is great. You value commitment and loyalty and consistency and while I do, as well, we don’t value it in the same way.

    Do what works for you. And we’ll all be ok.

    • Matt Reply

      Jamie. I’m really glad you stepped into this, because you provide a very unique and interesting perspective on the subject.

      I am not advocating that people stay just to stay – and I guess you CAN rationalize it as “Well I’m going to quit someday, why not now” – but that doesn’t make a lot of sense toe me. That’s like starting a job and saying “Well, I’m going to retire someday, which means I’m going to quit, so why don’t I just go ahead and save myself the trouble later in life”.

      I really think that our (generations) sense of entitlement can get in the way sometimes. I think it’s good to be entitled and know what you want, and I think companies are going to have to (and already are) tweaking their work environment to cater to us folks who want our jobs to have MEANING. I know where I want to be, eventually, but I also accept that there are going to be some things in life that aren’t the ideal. What kind of company isn’t worth being loyal to? I have worked some dead-end jobs, but I’ve still stuck each one of them out at least several months – is it not worth being loyal to because your not passionate about the work your doing? There may be a lack of intimate connection with every hired position you’re in, but I GUARNTEE you WILL learn something from the good and bad experiences.

      I am not doubting that you learned a lot about yourself through quitting your job early on – it took guts – but I think it takes more guts to keep an open mind and give something an honest effort before giving up. You may not like it, you may end up quitting – but at least you gave it your all, you learned something, you got something to put on your resume, and you made a little money; all of these being extremely important.

      I’m not trying to debunk your way of thinking – on the contrary I am opening up the floor for discussion because there are clearly two very different ways of approaching this topic. How do you see our values differing? Why is it better to leave sooner than later than stick around and develop experience?

      • Jamie Reply

        Today I found out that 3 people at the job I quit got laid off and most of the other ones went to part time. One of the people that got laid off was the person that replaced me.

        This was not my first job. I’ve been working at different jobs since I was 15, not including less ideal babysitting positions. None of these past positions were ideal, but I knew that the benefit of learning from these positions outweighed the fact that it wasn’t exactly what I wanted to be doing.

        You are narrowing time when you say that sticking it out equals out to X amount of time. There are times where you quit early or you quit later, but you can’t put a time limit on what constitutes “sticking it out.” It’s an impossible game.

        You don’t have to tell me that I learn from experiences. But, you don’t get to say what’s long enough or what’s short enough, in terms of lesson learning experiences. I’ve learned a year’s worth of experiences in a day before or spent six months learning one experience. It’s all relative.

        Some experiences in life last years – some last a day – some last 2 weeks. I’m not about to put strict confines on myself about what constitutes a proper learning experience or what constitutes the definition of “sticking it out.”

        You are not separating your own biases and beliefs about commitment and learning experiences in both your post and reply to my comment.

        You have a certain timeline you are adhering to in terms of what defines a proper commitment. I don’t adhere to that. And, I don’t believe any company deserves my loyalty, just as not every friend deserves my trust or every lover deserves my undying devotion. I get to pick and choose where my effort goes and I can choose to learn from an experience in 2 weeks and another in 6 months.

        If I start putting these very strict boxes around myself of when I stay and when I go, then I’m not following who I am or being flexible to what comes my way. You are more conservative about these things. I am not.

        • Matt Reply

          Jamie. First of all, I want to be clear that I am not singling you out in this post at all. I used your original post as an example because your way of thinking is on one end of the spectrum, where as the post Eva wrote was on the other. It was an illustration that there are very different, and strongly opinionated views on this topic (we all saw how heated the conversation got on Penelope’s blog).

          I have no doubt that you have solid experience under your belt – and whatever the situation was with the job you quit – I’m sure there was good reason for leaving. Again, my goal here was to not single you out and pick your decision-making-process apart. This is a discussion about facing adversity and powering through it instead of giving up.

          I do not have a ‘time line’ of how long I believe you should work somewhere. And if you are unhappy, by all means look for other work. But for me, personally, and for a lot of people, quitting without a backup plan is not an option. You are fortunate in that you have a family that supported your decision and welcomed you into their home while you DO pursue your passions. Many, many people do not have that – so where would we have been if we were in your shoes? We would of stuck it out. How would we have handled it? A lot of people would have had a negative attitude, they would have told themselves ‘this isn’t where I want to be’ and they would have shut down.

          The point I am trying to get across is that, even when facing adversity, a LOT can be learned. And for most of us, a job is an absolute necessity – so use your non ideal situation as a learning experience and GROW from it.

          There is no time line here – I don’t have a strict structure box that I have to conform to, I can be flexible, even if I’m not living my dream (right now). I’m willing to compromise a little for the time being while I learn and continue to gain credibility. I know what I’m doing right now isn’t my life’s plan. I want flexibility, I want to break away and journey down the path of a startup – but every day I go into the office, I tell myself that the experience I’m gaining will pay off in the future.

          And on the side, I blog, I network, I engage – there can be an integration of both, it doesn’t have to be either or. Your passions don’t die when you work a nine to five.

        • Eva Reply

          Though I know this isn’t directed at me, I feel obligated to jump in, since I am the one with the other extreme viewpoint.

          A common argument is that companies don’t deserve our loyalty because they’ll just lay us off. Not every company will do that. From a corporate viewpoint, it’s almost like deciding that every employee will quit, or slack off, or whatever… Just as that attitude prevents organizations from performing their best it’ll also keep employees from reaching their full potential.

          I fully agree with Jamie on the time thing and am in no way trying to put a constriction on time. You can learn a lot in a day or you can learn nothing in a year.

          Jamie and I do differ on the definition of loyalty, it seems. I don’t consider loyalty lasting a lifetime. For me, it means following through with a promise (with the exception of extreme circumstances, see my other comment to Matt below).

          Basically, there are rules and there are exceptions. I do not think everyone should give every job a year. But at the same time, Jamie is not advocating that everyone should quit a job they immediately dislike within 2 weeks. Maybe the message is do what is right for you — in a way you can combine the two viewpoints and say, “you should try to stick it out for a year, but if you decide not to, that’s also ok too”

  • Jamie Reply

    You make great points. However, you should check out “The Dip” by Seth Godin.

    Staying because you don’t want to quit is foolish, in my opinion. There is no need to show loyalty to a company that isn’t worth giving loyalty to.

    Eventually, you’re going to quit your job and whether you stay for 6 months or 1 year or 10 years, you’re still a quitter.

    Most of what you wrote about here are your own personal values, which is great. You value commitment and loyalty and consistency and while I do, as well, we don’t value it in the same way.

    Do what works for you. And we’ll all be ok.

    • Matt Reply

      Jamie. I’m really glad you stepped into this, because you provide a very unique and interesting perspective on the subject.

      I am not advocating that people stay just to stay – and I guess you CAN rationalize it as “Well I’m going to quit someday, why not now” – but that doesn’t make a lot of sense toe me. That’s like starting a job and saying “Well, I’m going to retire someday, which means I’m going to quit, so why don’t I just go ahead and save myself the trouble later in life”.

      I really think that our (generations) sense of entitlement can get in the way sometimes. I think it’s good to be entitled and know what you want, and I think companies are going to have to (and already are) tweaking their work environment to cater to us folks who want our jobs to have MEANING. I know where I want to be, eventually, but I also accept that there are going to be some things in life that aren’t the ideal. What kind of company isn’t worth being loyal to? I have worked some dead-end jobs, but I’ve still stuck each one of them out at least several months – is it not worth being loyal to because your not passionate about the work your doing? There may be a lack of intimate connection with every hired position you’re in, but I GUARNTEE you WILL learn something from the good and bad experiences.

      I am not doubting that you learned a lot about yourself through quitting your job early on – it took guts – but I think it takes more guts to keep an open mind and give something an honest effort before giving up. You may not like it, you may end up quitting – but at least you gave it your all, you learned something, you got something to put on your resume, and you made a little money; all of these being extremely important.

      I’m not trying to debunk your way of thinking – on the contrary I am opening up the floor for discussion because there are clearly two very different ways of approaching this topic. How do you see our values differing? Why is it better to leave sooner than later than stick around and develop experience?

      • Jamie Reply

        Today I found out that 3 people at the job I quit got laid off and most of the other ones went to part time. One of the people that got laid off was the person that replaced me.

        This was not my first job. I’ve been working at different jobs since I was 15, not including less ideal babysitting positions. None of these past positions were ideal, but I knew that the benefit of learning from these positions outweighed the fact that it wasn’t exactly what I wanted to be doing.

        You are narrowing time when you say that sticking it out equals out to X amount of time. There are times where you quit early or you quit later, but you can’t put a time limit on what constitutes “sticking it out.” It’s an impossible game.

        You don’t have to tell me that I learn from experiences. But, you don’t get to say what’s long enough or what’s short enough, in terms of lesson learning experiences. I’ve learned a year’s worth of experiences in a day before or spent six months learning one experience. It’s all relative.

        Some experiences in life last years – some last a day – some last 2 weeks. I’m not about to put strict confines on myself about what constitutes a proper learning experience or what constitutes the definition of “sticking it out.”

        You are not separating your own biases and beliefs about commitment and learning experiences in both your post and reply to my comment.

        You have a certain timeline you are adhering to in terms of what defines a proper commitment. I don’t adhere to that. And, I don’t believe any company deserves my loyalty, just as not every friend deserves my trust or every lover deserves my undying devotion. I get to pick and choose where my effort goes and I can choose to learn from an experience in 2 weeks and another in 6 months.

        If I start putting these very strict boxes around myself of when I stay and when I go, then I’m not following who I am or being flexible to what comes my way. You are more conservative about these things. I am not.

        • Matt Reply

          Jamie. First of all, I want to be clear that I am not singling you out in this post at all. I used your original post as an example because your way of thinking is on one end of the spectrum, where as the post Eva wrote was on the other. It was an illustration that there are very different, and strongly opinionated views on this topic (we all saw how heated the conversation got on Penelope’s blog).

          I have no doubt that you have solid experience under your belt – and whatever the situation was with the job you quit – I’m sure there was good reason for leaving. Again, my goal here was to not single you out and pick your decision-making-process apart. This is a discussion about facing adversity and powering through it instead of giving up.

          I do not have a ‘time line’ of how long I believe you should work somewhere. And if you are unhappy, by all means look for other work. But for me, personally, and for a lot of people, quitting without a backup plan is not an option. You are fortunate in that you have a family that supported your decision and welcomed you into their home while you DO pursue your passions. Many, many people do not have that – so where would we have been if we were in your shoes? We would of stuck it out. How would we have handled it? A lot of people would have had a negative attitude, they would have told themselves ‘this isn’t where I want to be’ and they would have shut down.

          The point I am trying to get across is that, even when facing adversity, a LOT can be learned. And for most of us, a job is an absolute necessity – so use your non ideal situation as a learning experience and GROW from it.

          There is no time line here – I don’t have a strict structure box that I have to conform to, I can be flexible, even if I’m not living my dream (right now). I’m willing to compromise a little for the time being while I learn and continue to gain credibility. I know what I’m doing right now isn’t my life’s plan. I want flexibility, I want to break away and journey down the path of a startup – but every day I go into the office, I tell myself that the experience I’m gaining will pay off in the future.

          And on the side, I blog, I network, I engage – there can be an integration of both, it doesn’t have to be either or. Your passions don’t die when you work a nine to five.

        • Eva Reply

          Though I know this isn’t directed at me, I feel obligated to jump in, since I am the one with the other extreme viewpoint.

          A common argument is that companies don’t deserve our loyalty because they’ll just lay us off. Not every company will do that. From a corporate viewpoint, it’s almost like deciding that every employee will quit, or slack off, or whatever… Just as that attitude prevents organizations from performing their best it’ll also keep employees from reaching their full potential.

          I fully agree with Jamie on the time thing and am in no way trying to put a constriction on time. You can learn a lot in a day or you can learn nothing in a year.

          Jamie and I do differ on the definition of loyalty, it seems. I don’t consider loyalty lasting a lifetime. For me, it means following through with a promise (with the exception of extreme circumstances, see my other comment to Matt below).

          Basically, there are rules and there are exceptions. I do not think everyone should give every job a year. But at the same time, Jamie is not advocating that everyone should quit a job they immediately dislike within 2 weeks. Maybe the message is do what is right for you — in a way you can combine the two viewpoints and say, “you should try to stick it out for a year, but if you decide not to, that’s also ok too”

  • Eva Reply

    Your post inspired some more thoughts…

    Often times, adversity is the greatest opportunity for people to learn and grow. If you just quit each time you are faced with adversity, rather than tackling the battle head on, what will happen one day when you aren’t given an option to simply opt out?

    That being said, we all have our breaking points, though they may differ. So I pose this question – here and on my blog too.. Personally speaking, where do you draw the line between:
    a) quit without anything lined up
    b) starting looking for something new immediately
    c) give it a year, then start looking
    d) this job is pretty cool

    • Matt Reply

      Hey Eva. Thanks for getting involved here. I love the point you make: “Adversity is the greatest opportunity for people to learn and grow”. When we get knocked down, when we’re in uncomfortable situations, we adapt, we learn, we develop. That’s what it’s all about.

      Do you think there is ever a point in which you won’t be able to ‘opt out’? Does there come a time when you’re pretty much stuck? I think the greatest thing about the human mind is the ability to make decisions – and I think, at any point in life, if we’re unhappy or uncomfortable, we can make the choice to move away from that. But, more importantly, I think we have to look inward and ask ourselves is the situation making us miserable, or are we negatively impacting the situation? I think people will be surprised that with a change in attitude and an open mind, your previously lackluster working environment may take a turn for the better. Maybe not, but too often people give up before giving something a chance.

      • JR Moreau Reply

        I’ll say this; I’ve come close to quitting jobs before when I was ABSOLUTELY miserable, but forced myself to stick it out and change my perspective so that I could get out of bed and see some positive in an otherwise negative situation. This has gotten me through a lot of rough patches.

        However, the perspective is usually that I can take away a bit of good from this for the time being, but that I need to figure out a way to be happy in my job and if that is impossible, then I need to find a way to get into a job that will make me happy, or maybe even plan to start my own business.

        Quitting without a plan is an awful idea. Doing most things in life without some sort of a plan isn’t smart. Understanding why you want to do something, or why you DO NOT want to do something is very important so you don’t make the same mistakes again.

      • Eva Reply

        Absolutely you can be stuck. And I mean this in a more general sense, not just in a job. The situation can range from a bland ‘you’re married with kids and you’ve been living paycheck to paycheck and you need to have a job IN THIS TOWN and cannot be without a wage, at your current rate, for more than a day’ to the extreme ‘you are held prisoner in a foreign country under the threat of death…’ (to be clear, I’m not mocking, this obviously and unfortunately happens).

        Either way, you have to deal with it. You pretty much are stuck. Are you mentally strong enough to deal with a difficult situation if everything always came easy and you were in the habit of getting your way? And you had no practice ‘dealing with it’? If you always expected life to be fair? If you were entitled to freedom, happiness, and getting paid what you were worth? In a difficult situation, that attitude can come back and bite you real quick.

        In sum, I think there is a line that needs to be drawn between simply “this sucks” versus “this is detrimental to my [personal or professional, emotional or physical] well-being.” I will stick it out for the former but not the latter. The definition of each, however, is a personal decision.

        • Matt Reply

          Eva. It’s clear that, in the end, it comes down to a personal choice. But when it comes to qutting your job, many times, for many people, quitting is NOT an option. JR makes a valid point in saying that it’s never smart to quit a job without a backup plan, and in short, it’s not possible for most people.

          All I’m saying, through this discussion,is that everything has to be taken in stride, and that instead of hanging your head and saying ‘this sucks’ you can hold your head up and say ‘I’ll become a stronger and more experienced person from this’. It’s all about a state of mind and maintaining a positive attitude – keep telling yourself you’ll get to where you want to be. Why? Because you will.

  • Eva Reply

    Your post inspired some more thoughts…

    Often times, adversity is the greatest opportunity for people to learn and grow. If you just quit each time you are faced with adversity, rather than tackling the battle head on, what will happen one day when you aren’t given an option to simply opt out?

    That being said, we all have our breaking points, though they may differ. So I pose this question – here and on my blog too.. Personally speaking, where do you draw the line between:
    a) quit without anything lined up
    b) starting looking for something new immediately
    c) give it a year, then start looking
    d) this job is pretty cool

    • Matt Reply

      Hey Eva. Thanks for getting involved here. I love the point you make: “Adversity is the greatest opportunity for people to learn and grow”. When we get knocked down, when we’re in uncomfortable situations, we adapt, we learn, we develop. That’s what it’s all about.

      Do you think there is ever a point in which you won’t be able to ‘opt out’? Does there come a time when you’re pretty much stuck? I think the greatest thing about the human mind is the ability to make decisions – and I think, at any point in life, if we’re unhappy or uncomfortable, we can make the choice to move away from that. But, more importantly, I think we have to look inward and ask ourselves is the situation making us miserable, or are we negatively impacting the situation? I think people will be surprised that with a change in attitude and an open mind, your previously lackluster working environment may take a turn for the better. Maybe not, but too often people give up before giving something a chance.

      • JR Moreau Reply

        I’ll say this; I’ve come close to quitting jobs before when I was ABSOLUTELY miserable, but forced myself to stick it out and change my perspective so that I could get out of bed and see some positive in an otherwise negative situation. This has gotten me through a lot of rough patches.

        However, the perspective is usually that I can take away a bit of good from this for the time being, but that I need to figure out a way to be happy in my job and if that is impossible, then I need to find a way to get into a job that will make me happy, or maybe even plan to start my own business.

        Quitting without a plan is an awful idea. Doing most things in life without some sort of a plan isn’t smart. Understanding why you want to do something, or why you DO NOT want to do something is very important so you don’t make the same mistakes again.

      • Eva Reply

        Absolutely you can be stuck. And I mean this in a more general sense, not just in a job. The situation can range from a bland ‘you’re married with kids and you’ve been living paycheck to paycheck and you need to have a job IN THIS TOWN and cannot be without a wage, at your current rate, for more than a day’ to the extreme ‘you are held prisoner in a foreign country under the threat of death…’ (to be clear, I’m not mocking, this obviously and unfortunately happens).

        Either way, you have to deal with it. You pretty much are stuck. Are you mentally strong enough to deal with a difficult situation if everything always came easy and you were in the habit of getting your way? And you had no practice ‘dealing with it’? If you always expected life to be fair? If you were entitled to freedom, happiness, and getting paid what you were worth? In a difficult situation, that attitude can come back and bite you real quick.

        In sum, I think there is a line that needs to be drawn between simply “this sucks” versus “this is detrimental to my [personal or professional, emotional or physical] well-being.” I will stick it out for the former but not the latter. The definition of each, however, is a personal decision.

        • Matt Reply

          Eva. It’s clear that, in the end, it comes down to a personal choice. But when it comes to qutting your job, many times, for many people, quitting is NOT an option. JR makes a valid point in saying that it’s never smart to quit a job without a backup plan, and in short, it’s not possible for most people.

          All I’m saying, through this discussion,is that everything has to be taken in stride, and that instead of hanging your head and saying ‘this sucks’ you can hold your head up and say ‘I’ll become a stronger and more experienced person from this’. It’s all about a state of mind and maintaining a positive attitude – keep telling yourself you’ll get to where you want to be. Why? Because you will.

  • Kim Reply

    I think this is true to certain degrees. I wholeheartedly believe there are things to learn from every position you have, but there is a right time to leave that position. Job hoping isn’t a good idea, but we’re entering an age where company loyalty is a thing of the past for numerous reasons (sometimes the company just doesn’t exist anymore, is one).

    Usually you cannot tell within two weeks if the job is right for you. I can see that being true almost all of the time. I think a lot of people have weird reactions when they start jobs because they’re overwhelmed.

    Great post!

    • Matt Reply

      Hey Kim, thanks for stopping by! I agree with you 100% – I don’t believe in loyalty for the sake of being loyal, but you make a very good point regarding how most of us feel when we first start a job. It’s awkward, it’s uncomfortable, we might feel out of place and odds are we don’t really know what we’re doing. This can be especially true for recent and upcoming graduates, working at their first FULL TIME gig.

      My point is that we should do our due diligence and give everything a shot – it took me several months to settle into my current position and establish a routine I was comfortable with. You’ll realize, over time, if you really are not a good fit within a company, but at least you’ve learned something and adding something to your resume in the process.

  • Kim Reply

    I think this is true to certain degrees. I wholeheartedly believe there are things to learn from every position you have, but there is a right time to leave that position. Job hoping isn’t a good idea, but we’re entering an age where company loyalty is a thing of the past for numerous reasons (sometimes the company just doesn’t exist anymore, is one).

    Usually you cannot tell within two weeks if the job is right for you. I can see that being true almost all of the time. I think a lot of people have weird reactions when they start jobs because they’re overwhelmed.

    Great post!

    • Matt Reply

      Hey Kim, thanks for stopping by! I agree with you 100% – I don’t believe in loyalty for the sake of being loyal, but you make a very good point regarding how most of us feel when we first start a job. It’s awkward, it’s uncomfortable, we might feel out of place and odds are we don’t really know what we’re doing. This can be especially true for recent and upcoming graduates, working at their first FULL TIME gig.

      My point is that we should do our due diligence and give everything a shot – it took me several months to settle into my current position and establish a routine I was comfortable with. You’ll realize, over time, if you really are not a good fit within a company, but at least you’ve learned something and adding something to your resume in the process.

  • clarks ナタリー Reply

    レディースブーツ

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