100 Word Book Review: David Meerman Scott’s New Rules of Marketing & PR

Readers Digest Version (100 words)

New Rules of Marketing & PR

I read “New Rules” over course of a few hours on a Sunday morning – it’s an easy to digest, straight to the point read that hits hard on two major points: 1) New media is here – its real – and EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media. 2) Tools are constantly changing and with that, so should your marketing and PR approach. A someone who’s very connected to this “online world” – I still found great value in Scott’s book. Highly recommended for anyone, especially business-owners looking to make their first splash into the online world.

The Long Version (462 words)

As promised, in an effort to keep true to my “resolution” of reading at least one new book per month – I kicked things off with David Meerman Scott’s “New Rules of Marketing and PR” – which was actually handed down to my by my current boss.

The title of the book speaks volumes. In today’s world of technological innovation – the Web 2.0 world (primarily blogging and Social Media) is changing the rules of how we approach marketing and PR. Here are three of my key takeaways from Scott’s book:

The web is different. Instead of one-way interruption, Web marketing is about delivering useful content at just the precise moment that the buyer needs it.

Web 2.0 is all about conversation – we blog – we engage on Social Media platforms like Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook because we have a voice that we want other people to hear. The “new rules” encourage this two-way communication. Gone are the days of talking AT your readers and customers – today’s mantra is to talk WITH them – spark conversation and provide a platform that facilitates discussion.

Businesses will live or die on original content. If you are creating truly useful content for your customers, you’re going to be seen in a great light and with a great spirit – you’re setting the table for new business. The vast majority of companies don’t seem to care.

This is a critical point. Whether you’re a business, a blogger, or both – you live and die by the content you create. Becoming a thought leader isn’t about necessarily being the expert – it’s about knowing what content your community wants and being able to deliver it WHEN they want it – at that precise time – even if the customer or reader doesn’t know they want it yet. Thought leadership is unique, timely, and innovative.

Developing thought leadership requires the company to “think like the buyer” and publish content that directly serves a need or want. Find out what the most important things your customers are searching for, reading, and talking about.

No one likes the “me me me” approach – and while it’s extremely important to remain genuine and show a little personality (two values Scott hits on repeatidly) – you should not be writing about YOUR company, YOUR product, and YOUR life. You need to be writing with the intent to present a benefit to your audience. What’s in it for them? Why should they take the time to read your post, respond to a question, or buy your product? Once you tap into the psyche of your community, the rest will fall into place.

Overall, I highly recommend checking out New Rules of Marketing & PR. Scott presents his material in an easy to digest way that would prove useful to any blogger, entrepreneur, or business-owner.

Have you read New Rules of Marketing & PR? What were your takeaways? What other books have you read this month?


124 Responses
  • Nicole VanScoten Reply

    Matt,

    Great review! I actually read this book almost a year ago when social media was the hot new thing (at least for me — I guess it’s still that way for a lot of people/companies), and I felt like it really helped me understand the gist of what social media was about. I think a lot of companies still don’t understand the “what’s in it for me?” concept, which is sometimes hard to hammer in their heads. More people should read this book!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks Nicole. I know I’m a little behind the times in finally getting around to read this one – but glad I finally did. While I don’t think there is anything “innovative” here – maybe because I read SO many blogs about the topic all the time – but his points are sound and are extremely valuable, especially for a business wondering how to get into the Web 2.0 scene themselves.

  • Nicole VanScoten Reply

    Matt,

    Great review! I actually read this book almost a year ago when social media was the hot new thing (at least for me — I guess it’s still that way for a lot of people/companies), and I felt like it really helped me understand the gist of what social media was about. I think a lot of companies still don’t understand the “what’s in it for me?” concept, which is sometimes hard to hammer in their heads. More people should read this book!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks Nicole. I know I’m a little behind the times in finally getting around to read this one – but glad I finally did. While I don’t think there is anything “innovative” here – maybe because I read SO many blogs about the topic all the time – but his points are sound and are extremely valuable, especially for a business wondering how to get into the Web 2.0 scene themselves.

  • Tim Jahn Reply

    “and EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media”

    I highly disagree with this statement. “Social media” is NOT for every company, nor should every company care about it. Ever seen that “American Loggers” show on Discover Channel? Should that logging company be using social media?

    No. It doesn’t fit their business very well.

    Let’s stop assuming (and trying to force) everybody and their brother’s company to use social media just because it’s the cool thing to do.

    Let’s start thinking instead.

    • Jen Reply

      I agree with Tim, in my business it doesn’t make sense to Tweet about the things we are doing or blog about them. Actually, it would violate a whole boatload of non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements which is why I never talk about where I work or what we do online. Plus, I’m pretty sure the types of people looking to do business with our company, aren’t going online to find the information they need, just trust me on this, since I can’t elaborate. In my business though it is more important to have research articles published, and discoveries made than it is to Tweet about it. You can’t exactly “become a fan” of what my company does. Just my two cents. I should get back to work now.

      • Tim Jahn Reply

        Bingo. Thank you :)

        Sad to see a bolierplate “social media” post here, Matt. Expected more from ya.

        • Matt Cheuvront Reply

          I’m sorry to disappoint you here Tim. Jen (and Tim) I hear what you are saying. Maybe I didn’t phrase this correctly above but I think there is value for EVERY company to use some form of Social Media. That doesn’t mean your company needs to build a fan-base on Twitter and Facebook – but maybe there should be time invested in monitoring trending searches, reading relevant blog posts that apply to your business, or heck, even reading a book review here that tells you to go out and read something that might enhance your marketing approach.

          There’s no cookie cutter approach – no specific thing you HAVE to be doing – and Social Media isn’t the end all be all – but I stand by my point that I think there is value that every company can tap into in some way.

    • Andrew Swenson Reply

      I’m with Tim here too.

      I once worked with a client who sold nearly 80% of their product through one catalog mailing.

      Sure there’s a potential to reach new customers online, but it takes far fewer resources to publish one catalog every 12 months than to develop content for an online audience every day.

      For them, it came down to a simple ROI calculation. They were able to grow their business through targeted mailings at a scale and pace they could handle.

      Maybe it will be different in 10 years, but no matter how you slice it, there are still lots of customers out there who have no interest in blogs or social networks.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        I don’t disagree with you Andrew – there are varying levels of usefulness – but there is a degree to which Social Media and the web can be valuable to any company. It’s up to the company to figure out if the return on investment is worth the time spent. Thanks for the comment!

        • Matt Reply

          Matt-

          I agree that Social Media has value in any corporation, large or small. But big businesses in highly regulated industries seem to frown upon the opportunity. They’re concerned about privacy rights and culpability issues, just to name a few.

          So, how would you present compelling arguments to such legacy businesses that ignite a transformation; trigger a tipping point?

          Cheers!
          Matt

  • Tim Jahn Reply

    “and EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media”

    I highly disagree with this statement. “Social media” is NOT for every company, nor should every company care about it. Ever seen that “American Loggers” show on Discover Channel? Should that logging company be using social media?

    No. It doesn’t fit their business very well.

    Let’s stop assuming (and trying to force) everybody and their brother’s company to use social media just because it’s the cool thing to do.

    Let’s start thinking instead.

    • Jen Reply

      I agree with Tim, in my business it doesn’t make sense to Tweet about the things we are doing or blog about them. Actually, it would violate a whole boatload of non-disclosure and confidentiality agreements which is why I never talk about where I work or what we do online. Plus, I’m pretty sure the types of people looking to do business with our company, aren’t going online to find the information they need, just trust me on this, since I can’t elaborate. In my business though it is more important to have research articles published, and discoveries made than it is to Tweet about it. You can’t exactly “become a fan” of what my company does. Just my two cents. I should get back to work now.

      • Tim Jahn Reply

        Bingo. Thank you :)

        Sad to see a bolierplate “social media” post here, Matt. Expected more from ya.

        • Matt Cheuvront Reply

          I’m sorry to disappoint you here Tim. Jen (and Tim) I hear what you are saying. Maybe I didn’t phrase this correctly above but I think there is value for EVERY company to use some form of Social Media. That doesn’t mean your company needs to build a fan-base on Twitter and Facebook – but maybe there should be time invested in monitoring trending searches, reading relevant blog posts that apply to your business, or heck, even reading a book review here that tells you to go out and read something that might enhance your marketing approach.

          There’s no cookie cutter approach – no specific thing you HAVE to be doing – and Social Media isn’t the end all be all – but I stand by my point that I think there is value that every company can tap into in some way.

    • Andrew Swenson Reply

      I’m with Tim here too.

      I once worked with a client who sold nearly 80% of their product through one catalog mailing.

      Sure there’s a potential to reach new customers online, but it takes far fewer resources to publish one catalog every 12 months than to develop content for an online audience every day.

      For them, it came down to a simple ROI calculation. They were able to grow their business through targeted mailings at a scale and pace they could handle.

      Maybe it will be different in 10 years, but no matter how you slice it, there are still lots of customers out there who have no interest in blogs or social networks.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        I don’t disagree with you Andrew – there are varying levels of usefulness – but there is a degree to which Social Media and the web can be valuable to any company. It’s up to the company to figure out if the return on investment is worth the time spent. Thanks for the comment!

        • Matt Reply

          Matt-

          I agree that Social Media has value in any corporation, large or small. But big businesses in highly regulated industries seem to frown upon the opportunity. They’re concerned about privacy rights and culpability issues, just to name a few.

          So, how would you present compelling arguments to such legacy businesses that ignite a transformation; trigger a tipping point?

          Cheers!
          Matt

  • Srinivas Rao Reply

    Matt,

    Thanks for sharing this. I’m going to be adding to this to my reading list along with a few other books. It’s been an interesting experience for me to make the transition from personal blogging to corporate blogging. Translating the experience to a corporate setting is not as easy as most people would think. A personal blog is much easier, whereas with the corporate blog, you can’t just turn a 20 minute brain dump into a blog post. I”d love to chat with you about that sometime and how you are making the transition in your new role.

    • Tim Jahn Reply

      I think the corporate integration may have to do more with the way of thinking than the tools themselves. Corporations by nature aren’t used to being open or communicative. Rather, they prefer to be secret and closed, even to their own employees.

      The corporations that are shifting their culture and way of thinking to a more open, communicative approach are the ones I think will see true change.

      • Bloominglater Reply

        I have to disagree with you here, Tim. I don’t think it has as much to do with a corporation wanting to be secretive and closed as much as it has to do with the fact that the corporation – while having its own message – has to be sensitive to the ideologies of its constituents. For example – I work for a corporation and while we might want to blog about current events – to stop the ME, ME, ME – my product approach – we can’t do that. As soon as we do, we take sides, which alienates some of our customers. We have to walk a fine line between the law, compliance, and truly trying to be relevant and connect with our customers. This is especially true in heavily regulated industries like the one I’m in – finance. That said, I think that social media allows us to interact with our customers in ways that were never possible before. So there is value in EVERY company having some sort of online social platform, IMHO.

        Thanks for this, CHEVY!

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          I agree with ya there. Regulated industries definitely present their own challenges.

          You mention that “social media” still allows your company to interact with customers in new ways. Can you give some examples?

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Sure thing S – it’s a bit different with the company I work for – being in the Pediatric Therapy industry – I don’t claim to be any form of a “thought leader” but thus far – and moving forward – we are involving the entire staff in one way or another to contribute to our online marketing strategy – so far the therapists here have written 100 original articles on specific conditions, and, once we launch the new site, we will become more more active with blogging, Social Media, etc. Essentially with the goal of presenting both a timely and timeless resource, and of course, over time, introduce the web as a lead referral generation source.

      It’s quite the challenge ahead, believe me – but exciting to take on.

      • Srinivas Rao Reply

        Matt,

        I know what you mean. I’ve been incorporating alot of what you have talked about in terms of involving other people and building community into the strategy at my position.

  • Srinivas Rao Reply

    Matt,

    Thanks for sharing this. I’m going to be adding to this to my reading list along with a few other books. It’s been an interesting experience for me to make the transition from personal blogging to corporate blogging. Translating the experience to a corporate setting is not as easy as most people would think. A personal blog is much easier, whereas with the corporate blog, you can’t just turn a 20 minute brain dump into a blog post. I”d love to chat with you about that sometime and how you are making the transition in your new role.

    • Tim Jahn Reply

      I think the corporate integration may have to do more with the way of thinking than the tools themselves. Corporations by nature aren’t used to being open or communicative. Rather, they prefer to be secret and closed, even to their own employees.

      The corporations that are shifting their culture and way of thinking to a more open, communicative approach are the ones I think will see true change.

      • Bloominglater Reply

        I have to disagree with you here, Tim. I don’t think it has as much to do with a corporation wanting to be secretive and closed as much as it has to do with the fact that the corporation – while having its own message – has to be sensitive to the ideologies of its constituents. For example – I work for a corporation and while we might want to blog about current events – to stop the ME, ME, ME – my product approach – we can’t do that. As soon as we do, we take sides, which alienates some of our customers. We have to walk a fine line between the law, compliance, and truly trying to be relevant and connect with our customers. This is especially true in heavily regulated industries like the one I’m in – finance. That said, I think that social media allows us to interact with our customers in ways that were never possible before. So there is value in EVERY company having some sort of online social platform, IMHO.

        Thanks for this, CHEVY!

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          I agree with ya there. Regulated industries definitely present their own challenges.

          You mention that “social media” still allows your company to interact with customers in new ways. Can you give some examples?

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Sure thing S – it’s a bit different with the company I work for – being in the Pediatric Therapy industry – I don’t claim to be any form of a “thought leader” but thus far – and moving forward – we are involving the entire staff in one way or another to contribute to our online marketing strategy – so far the therapists here have written 100 original articles on specific conditions, and, once we launch the new site, we will become more more active with blogging, Social Media, etc. Essentially with the goal of presenting both a timely and timeless resource, and of course, over time, introduce the web as a lead referral generation source.

      It’s quite the challenge ahead, believe me – but exciting to take on.

      • Srinivas Rao Reply

        Matt,

        I know what you mean. I’ve been incorporating alot of what you have talked about in terms of involving other people and building community into the strategy at my position.

  • Heidi Cool Reply

    I look forward to reading this book. I saw a video of a presentation David Meerman Scott made recently and he gave some great examples regarding why and how businesses can get involved. Is it for everyone? I’m not sure, there may be little companies that just can’t find the staff time just yet. But I don’t know that we can rule it out for specific industries or organization types as a whole. I know many think that it won’t work for them because they “have nothing to say,” are in a “boring niche,” or don’t think their customers use the Internet, but usually there’s still an opportunity and more to be said than they think.

    Tim, I’m not familiar with the logging company you reference, but who knows, there could be a use scenario that would work for them. If they didn’t need to use it for marketing they might find it helpful for PR or collaboration. The key is that it’s not just about jumping in blindly. We’ve certainly all seen accounts that were obviously just created because someone said “We should make a Facebook page and start Tweeting so we don’t get left behind.” Naturally that sort of usage generally fails, but if businesses clearly assess their goals, do some research and come up with a social media plan that integrates with their other strategies it can be hugely beneficial. And if nothing else I think it behooves business to at least start using social media as a listening tool, to find out what their customers (and others) are saying about both their businesses and brands and their industry in general.

    • Tim Jahn Reply

      Keep in mind there’s regulated and sensitive industries too, where social media has little value.

      My wife’s a teacher – should she start tweeting about the students that piss her off or how stupid one of her kids was today in class? No.

      How about a lawyer? Should they tweet during the middle of a trial about sensitive information? Of course not.

      Should the garbage man post Facebook updates about the crap he finds in alleys? He could. Will it get him more business? Not sure.

      The point is that all the people in “social media” circles think it’s the best thing ever and that everybody and their entire family should be using these shiny new tools. And of course that’s not true at all. As with any tools, some work for some people and they don’t work for other people.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        In short – I think Social Media and blogging can be used by any company out there – even if it’s only to listen and monitor conversation. Generalizing it into teacher’s “tweeting about students who piss her off” of lawyers “tweeting during the middle of a trial” doesn’t make any sense and that’s not what I (or David Meerman Scott is saying). But there are tons of resources out there, blogs to read, people to follow on Twitter, than can provide a valuable resource to your wife that she might be able to apply to the classroom setting. I didn’t say EVERYONE needs to be on twitter, or EVERYONE needs to start a blog – but there IS value in the web 2.0 world across all platforms and every company SHOULD spend some time looking into it.

      • Bloominglater Reply

        @Tim Could your wife tweet or blog about ways to help children succeed in the classroom – sure she could. That would be a benefit to parents AND other teachers.

        Could the trial lawyer tweet about the victory that he just got for his client – sure thing. Could that get him more business?

        What about the garbage man? Could he write about turning his trash into treasure? Is there an audience for that? Of course there is.

        That’s the point. We have to be creative and innovative to meet the needs of our audiences – that’s not just restricted to some fields. The question is the – is there value for the customer? I think there can be.

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          You’re missing the point about regulated industries and sensitive industries…

      • Justin Goldsborough Reply

        Agree there are highly-regulated industries that require a different type of social media experience and different rules. That said, those companies have customers they could learn from through conversation, no? Or they have peers in their industry who they could share best practices and failures with in order to do their jobs better, right? Both of those scenarios can be facilitated by social media.

        Should your wife tweet about students that piss her off? No. But could she participate in a private forum (e.g. LinkedIn group) of teachers sharing ideas about how to best handle talented kids who have trouble focusing in class?

        Any lawyer who read your comment just cringed at the thought of tweeting about sensitive information during a trial :). But could lawyers have a conversation about an industry white paper uploaded to scribd.com or docstoc and learn lessons from each other?

        I don’t much care to read about the crap garbage men find in alleys. But I would like a way to contact my garbage men — actually the waste management company that employs him/her — when my trash doesn’t get picked up on time or when our trash cans are thrown into the street. Maybe an opportunity to respond to customer issues via social media (e.g. Twitter)?

        Awareness is a goal of every company. And that alone might be reason enough for all of them to consider social media. But staying up to date on trends and learning from others are a couple of additional reasons. Today’s customers expect unprecedented accessibility to the brands they choose. Doesn’t mean every brand need a Twitter account or blog (Facebook fan page they do, IMO, but that’s another conversation).

        Still, all brands can gain from social media. After all, can’t all businesses gain from communicating and building relationships? And isn’t that at least part of what social media provides?

        Best,
        Justin
        @JGoldsborough

        • Matt Cheuvront Reply

          Well said Justin – and I think now we are finally peeling a layer off this conversation and getting to the point – that Social Media is a very VERY broad term that encompasses MANY different platforms – ones that can be useful both or either internally and externally for any company.

          I was actually somewhat surprised by Tim’s comment above about tweeting in the classroom or during a trial. He’s in this space a lot and has to know that there is a lot more to Social Media than JUST blogging and Twitter. I grouped everything together in the initial post in an effort to keep things somewhat concise, but in the future I think it would be worth it to most of us to explore some of the more niche networks out there (Tim, I mentioned one of these – ActiveRain – in my post over at David Spinks blog when you asked for examples). They are out there, and every company should take time to do a little research and see what works for them, either in-house, B2C, or both.

          Thank you for the comment Justin. Cheers!

  • Heidi Cool Reply

    I look forward to reading this book. I saw a video of a presentation David Meerman Scott made recently and he gave some great examples regarding why and how businesses can get involved. Is it for everyone? I’m not sure, there may be little companies that just can’t find the staff time just yet. But I don’t know that we can rule it out for specific industries or organization types as a whole. I know many think that it won’t work for them because they “have nothing to say,” are in a “boring niche,” or don’t think their customers use the Internet, but usually there’s still an opportunity and more to be said than they think.

    Tim, I’m not familiar with the logging company you reference, but who knows, there could be a use scenario that would work for them. If they didn’t need to use it for marketing they might find it helpful for PR or collaboration. The key is that it’s not just about jumping in blindly. We’ve certainly all seen accounts that were obviously just created because someone said “We should make a Facebook page and start Tweeting so we don’t get left behind.” Naturally that sort of usage generally fails, but if businesses clearly assess their goals, do some research and come up with a social media plan that integrates with their other strategies it can be hugely beneficial. And if nothing else I think it behooves business to at least start using social media as a listening tool, to find out what their customers (and others) are saying about both their businesses and brands and their industry in general.

    • Tim Jahn Reply

      Keep in mind there’s regulated and sensitive industries too, where social media has little value.

      My wife’s a teacher – should she start tweeting about the students that piss her off or how stupid one of her kids was today in class? No.

      How about a lawyer? Should they tweet during the middle of a trial about sensitive information? Of course not.

      Should the garbage man post Facebook updates about the crap he finds in alleys? He could. Will it get him more business? Not sure.

      The point is that all the people in “social media” circles think it’s the best thing ever and that everybody and their entire family should be using these shiny new tools. And of course that’s not true at all. As with any tools, some work for some people and they don’t work for other people.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        In short – I think Social Media and blogging can be used by any company out there – even if it’s only to listen and monitor conversation. Generalizing it into teacher’s “tweeting about students who piss her off” of lawyers “tweeting during the middle of a trial” doesn’t make any sense and that’s not what I (or David Meerman Scott is saying). But there are tons of resources out there, blogs to read, people to follow on Twitter, than can provide a valuable resource to your wife that she might be able to apply to the classroom setting. I didn’t say EVERYONE needs to be on twitter, or EVERYONE needs to start a blog – but there IS value in the web 2.0 world across all platforms and every company SHOULD spend some time looking into it.

      • Bloominglater Reply

        @Tim Could your wife tweet or blog about ways to help children succeed in the classroom – sure she could. That would be a benefit to parents AND other teachers.

        Could the trial lawyer tweet about the victory that he just got for his client – sure thing. Could that get him more business?

        What about the garbage man? Could he write about turning his trash into treasure? Is there an audience for that? Of course there is.

        That’s the point. We have to be creative and innovative to meet the needs of our audiences – that’s not just restricted to some fields. The question is the – is there value for the customer? I think there can be.

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          You’re missing the point about regulated industries and sensitive industries…

      • Justin Goldsborough Reply

        Agree there are highly-regulated industries that require a different type of social media experience and different rules. That said, those companies have customers they could learn from through conversation, no? Or they have peers in their industry who they could share best practices and failures with in order to do their jobs better, right? Both of those scenarios can be facilitated by social media.

        Should your wife tweet about students that piss her off? No. But could she participate in a private forum (e.g. LinkedIn group) of teachers sharing ideas about how to best handle talented kids who have trouble focusing in class?

        Any lawyer who read your comment just cringed at the thought of tweeting about sensitive information during a trial :). But could lawyers have a conversation about an industry white paper uploaded to scribd.com or docstoc and learn lessons from each other?

        I don’t much care to read about the crap garbage men find in alleys. But I would like a way to contact my garbage men — actually the waste management company that employs him/her — when my trash doesn’t get picked up on time or when our trash cans are thrown into the street. Maybe an opportunity to respond to customer issues via social media (e.g. Twitter)?

        Awareness is a goal of every company. And that alone might be reason enough for all of them to consider social media. But staying up to date on trends and learning from others are a couple of additional reasons. Today’s customers expect unprecedented accessibility to the brands they choose. Doesn’t mean every brand need a Twitter account or blog (Facebook fan page they do, IMO, but that’s another conversation).

        Still, all brands can gain from social media. After all, can’t all businesses gain from communicating and building relationships? And isn’t that at least part of what social media provides?

        Best,
        Justin
        @JGoldsborough

        • Matt Cheuvront Reply

          Well said Justin – and I think now we are finally peeling a layer off this conversation and getting to the point – that Social Media is a very VERY broad term that encompasses MANY different platforms – ones that can be useful both or either internally and externally for any company.

          I was actually somewhat surprised by Tim’s comment above about tweeting in the classroom or during a trial. He’s in this space a lot and has to know that there is a lot more to Social Media than JUST blogging and Twitter. I grouped everything together in the initial post in an effort to keep things somewhat concise, but in the future I think it would be worth it to most of us to explore some of the more niche networks out there (Tim, I mentioned one of these – ActiveRain – in my post over at David Spinks blog when you asked for examples). They are out there, and every company should take time to do a little research and see what works for them, either in-house, B2C, or both.

          Thank you for the comment Justin. Cheers!

  • Tony Ruiz Reply

    Nice, I’ll make sure to check it out. The rules in PR and Marketing are rapidly changing and the thing the frustrates me the most is universities are slow on teaching these new concepts to PR and Marketing majors. Times are changing fast so the best way to keep up with new business trends is to seek the information yourself.

    • Nicole VanScoten Reply

      Tony,

      I agree! I graduated college in 2008, and didn’t learn one thing about social media. Luckily for current students at Tennessee, they’re finally starting to catch on and invite local practitioners in to guest teach classes on these subjects. However, I wish universities would be ahead of the trend a little more.

      • Tony Ruiz Reply

        A change in the current curriculum is needed…but inviting guess speakers is definitely a step. I had an argument with my professor that twitter is a communication tool for business including marketing and PR and he said its just a useless status update page for kids to play on..I just nodded my head and said to myself “If you only knew.”

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          I’ve found the best way to change a view like his is examples. Give him details and examples on how Twitter is used in world disasters, or crowdsourcing information/answering a question, or raising money for a cause. The more you can demonstrate how Twitter is a valuable communication channel, rather than a useless Facebook status update, the more chance usually of helping people see “a point”.

          • Matt Cheuvront Reply

            Just to chime in – there was NOTHING about Social Media talked about in any of my classes – but then again – there was VERY little about Outdoor Advertising discussed (the industry I worked in before moving into the online world professionally). Tim makes a good point – in order for Social Media to be a viable educational piece, there needs to be examples (which there are) – but to a lot of teachers (and heck – a lot of businesses) – Social media seems like a waste of time. It’s up to people like us to educate the educators to educate…yeah, that makes sense :)

            • Tim Jahn Reply

              I don’t think social media tools (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc) necessarily need to be taught in school. The concepts do, though.

              I took many communications classes in college (both of my majors were in the Communications department) and explored many topics regarding the media and mass communications. We didn’t discuss Twitter or Facebook or anything (because those tools either didn’t exist yet or were just getting started), but the concepts still apply.

              Concepts are the important part. Tools will come and go much quicker.

  • Tony Ruiz Reply

    Nice, I’ll make sure to check it out. The rules in PR and Marketing are rapidly changing and the thing the frustrates me the most is universities are slow on teaching these new concepts to PR and Marketing majors. Times are changing fast so the best way to keep up with new business trends is to seek the information yourself.

    • Nicole VanScoten Reply

      Tony,

      I agree! I graduated college in 2008, and didn’t learn one thing about social media. Luckily for current students at Tennessee, they’re finally starting to catch on and invite local practitioners in to guest teach classes on these subjects. However, I wish universities would be ahead of the trend a little more.

      • Tony Ruiz Reply

        A change in the current curriculum is needed…but inviting guess speakers is definitely a step. I had an argument with my professor that twitter is a communication tool for business including marketing and PR and he said its just a useless status update page for kids to play on..I just nodded my head and said to myself “If you only knew.”

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          I’ve found the best way to change a view like his is examples. Give him details and examples on how Twitter is used in world disasters, or crowdsourcing information/answering a question, or raising money for a cause. The more you can demonstrate how Twitter is a valuable communication channel, rather than a useless Facebook status update, the more chance usually of helping people see “a point”.

          • Matt Cheuvront Reply

            Just to chime in – there was NOTHING about Social Media talked about in any of my classes – but then again – there was VERY little about Outdoor Advertising discussed (the industry I worked in before moving into the online world professionally). Tim makes a good point – in order for Social Media to be a viable educational piece, there needs to be examples (which there are) – but to a lot of teachers (and heck – a lot of businesses) – Social media seems like a waste of time. It’s up to people like us to educate the educators to educate…yeah, that makes sense :)

            • Tim Jahn Reply

              I don’t think social media tools (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, etc) necessarily need to be taught in school. The concepts do, though.

              I took many communications classes in college (both of my majors were in the Communications department) and explored many topics regarding the media and mass communications. We didn’t discuss Twitter or Facebook or anything (because those tools either didn’t exist yet or were just getting started), but the concepts still apply.

              Concepts are the important part. Tools will come and go much quicker.

  • Christina Reply

    Matt,

    So glad you’ll be posting about the new books you’re reading. I’ve promised myself to also read at least one book a month (hoping for two). This was perfect timing also since I just finished Crush It! by Gary Vaynerchuk, and absolutely loved it. I would recommend it to anyone.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Nice – and I hope you’ll keep coming back with recommendations. I need to read Crush It! I’m probably the last one alive who hasn’t read it, lol. I’m sure it will pop up somewhere on the “Required Reading” list this year. Thanks Christina!

      • Tim Jahn Reply

        Definitely worth reading. Short, to the point, actually useful!

      • Patrice Reply

        Yes, Crush It! is a must read. As Tim stated, short and to the point. I knocked that book out in 1 day.

  • Christina Reply

    Matt,

    So glad you’ll be posting about the new books you’re reading. I’ve promised myself to also read at least one book a month (hoping for two). This was perfect timing also since I just finished Crush It! by Gary Vaynerchuk, and absolutely loved it. I would recommend it to anyone.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Nice – and I hope you’ll keep coming back with recommendations. I need to read Crush It! I’m probably the last one alive who hasn’t read it, lol. I’m sure it will pop up somewhere on the “Required Reading” list this year. Thanks Christina!

      • Tim Jahn Reply

        Definitely worth reading. Short, to the point, actually useful!

      • Patrice Reply

        Yes, Crush It! is a must read. As Tim stated, short and to the point. I knocked that book out in 1 day.

  • Theresa Reply

    I’ve had the pleasure of hearing David Meerman Scott speak twice and I’ve read most of this book. For the reader, you will want to take notes and apply many of the principles in there to what you do now. I found it provided a lot of clarity.

    I think everyone here is making really good points. As marketers, we have to keep up with this ever changing world on what is and isn’t acceptable anymore on communicating with our audience. All anyone sees is that there are all these things available and they should be jumping on the bandwagon. Absolutely not. Web 2.0, social media or whatever you want to call it, are simply further extensions of how we can communicate – more tools in the marketing & PR toolbox. They need to be used appropriately and they need to be used with an end result in mind. There still needs to be an objective and a strategy involved. The rules of business might be new, but they haven’t changed. You still need to understand WHY you are doing something and what you want to get out of it.

    No doubt that many companies at least need to get out there and start listening; many are failing at serving their customers. One example is Barnes & Noble. Take a look at Ken Peters’ (@thinkBIG_blog) experience this Christmas. It’ll blow your socks off!

    There is one saying that seems to be stronger than ever: Perception is reality. As a company, your customers’ perception of you will match the reality of your brand if you do it right, otherwise they will decide what your brand stands for and that will take over faster than ever. Listen first and then find a way to join the conversation.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      All great points here Theresa. Thanks for throwing your perspective into the mix. When your communities perception and your perception align, you know you’re doing something right…

  • Theresa Reply

    I’ve had the pleasure of hearing David Meerman Scott speak twice and I’ve read most of this book. For the reader, you will want to take notes and apply many of the principles in there to what you do now. I found it provided a lot of clarity.

    I think everyone here is making really good points. As marketers, we have to keep up with this ever changing world on what is and isn’t acceptable anymore on communicating with our audience. All anyone sees is that there are all these things available and they should be jumping on the bandwagon. Absolutely not. Web 2.0, social media or whatever you want to call it, are simply further extensions of how we can communicate – more tools in the marketing & PR toolbox. They need to be used appropriately and they need to be used with an end result in mind. There still needs to be an objective and a strategy involved. The rules of business might be new, but they haven’t changed. You still need to understand WHY you are doing something and what you want to get out of it.

    No doubt that many companies at least need to get out there and start listening; many are failing at serving their customers. One example is Barnes & Noble. Take a look at Ken Peters’ (@thinkBIG_blog) experience this Christmas. It’ll blow your socks off!

    There is one saying that seems to be stronger than ever: Perception is reality. As a company, your customers’ perception of you will match the reality of your brand if you do it right, otherwise they will decide what your brand stands for and that will take over faster than ever. Listen first and then find a way to join the conversation.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      All great points here Theresa. Thanks for throwing your perspective into the mix. When your communities perception and your perception align, you know you’re doing something right…

  • David Meerman Scott Reply

    Hey Matt — thanks so much for the review – both the long and the short ones!

    I think that we’re now getting into a semantic issue. Much of the excellent discussion above is about “social media” which is a new term and for most people, especially those new to these ideas means “Twitter and Facebook and stuff like that.”

    But as you know, my book is about reaching buyers online. There are many tools beyond just blogs and twitter.

    Video, ebooks, photos, charts, graphs, content-rich websites, direct to consumer news releases, online media rooms are just some of the other tools.

    Should every company be on twitter? That’s not the right question. Should every company be reaching buyers online? The answer to that question is “YES”!!

    PS – second edition of my book came out last week.

    Thanks again, David

    • Mari Reply

      I haven’t read this book (sorry, David) and I probably never will (nothing against the topic, but I only have like 2 hours a week to read and I’d rather read political/historical memoirs.)

      The fact that David not only a) wrote this book, but b) cares what people are saying about it and c) comments on blog posts to connect with his readership shows me that he’s doing what he should be doing.

      Bravo.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        Agreed 100% Mari. Speaks volumes to David’s level of awareness and desire to engage with his readers.

    • Tim Jahn Reply

      “Should every company be reaching buyers online?”

      That makes more sense, David, and I agree with that more. That’s not the way Matt presented it, though, so that may have caused some confusion.

      • Bloominglater Reply

        @ Tim -

        I don’t think that there was any confusion. To your earlier point – could your wife Twitter about the kids driving her insane – sure she could – on her personal account. Should she want to enlighten others, she might write a blog post about how to help your children succeed in the classroom – tips from a teacher about to pluck her last nerve.

        the garbage man? same thing – what about him writing about turning other people’s trash into his treasure.

        there is no misunderstanding, Chev – the message is good and right on time. as people who find use in social media, it is not our jobs to stand at the gate and decide who should come in. that’s just a stupid argument in my opinion.

        thanks!

        Tiffany

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          “it is not our jobs to stand at the gate and decide who should come in. ”

          Who said anything about standing at the gate?…

          And yes, Matt did cause a misunderstanding. He said “EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media.” That’s not what David said at all. David said ” Should every company be reaching buyers online?”.

          Too TOTALLY different ideas.

          • Tim Jahn Reply

            Two, of course :)

            • Matt Cheuvront Reply

              I still stand by my initial statement that every company should be tapping into the web 2.o world – be it through blogging, Social Media, or other new media – I believe there is value to be had for any company or individual seeking it. The only misunderstanding is in semantics.

              • Tim Jahn Reply

                If we agree that we’re all lost in semantics, and “blogging, Social Media, or other new media” are all just the same thing, then nothing makes any sense.

                Weak defense, in my opinion. :)

                • Matt Cheuvront Reply

                  Where did I say they are all the same thing? I didn’t. In the post above and the comments here I say that every company should be tapping into Social Media/blogging/Web 2.0 to some extent – what that extent is varies from business to business. But you can’t prove to me that there is absolutely NO point for any company – just like I can’t prove to you that there IS some value for every company. Sometimes we just have to agree to disagree, and leave it at that.

                  • Tim Jahn Reply

                    Your initial statement wasn’t “that every company should be tapping into the web 2.o world – be it through blogging, Social Media, or other new media”.

                    Rather, it was that “New media is here – its real – and EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media.”

                    The problem, of course, is that there is no clear definition of what “new media” is or what “social media” is. Hence the idea that we’re lost in semantics.

                    Except if we just defend our statements by saying we’re lost in semantics, we’re not getting anywhere. At some point, we need to agree on a definition for “new media” and “social media”.

                    Since you didn’t do that in this post, our conversation is probably endless and a constant back and forth without any conclusion.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi David – thanks so much for stopping by – really speaks volumes to your level of engagement to stop by other blogs when a review pops up. People remember that sort of thing – well done.

      Agreed that your blog is about much more than what I’ve highlighted above – and I agree that we’re somewhat caught up in the semantics. At the end of the day – every company can and SHOULD be using the web to reach buyers and engage with their community.

      Thanks again for stopping by sir – and for the great read. Cheers!

    • Eija Paajanen Reply

      This book was an eye-opener for me. Great reading! I had just only started to understand that social media might be something to think about, but extending the topic to cover the whole wide selection of online marketing was really good. I must confess I used to think of social media just as “something for the kids”, but in the last months I have become to understand the various possibilities it offers. It will still require a lot of thinking to find the suitable ways to support our business, but that’s the great part of the online – you are never ready, and can always learn more. Took a practical step and opened up my Twitter account recently, just to listen and learn more.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        Hi Eija – thanks for the follow. Interested in what kind of business you are in, since there has been a lot of discussion here on “should every business use social media”?

        I think that is still a widely generalized perception – that it’s something “for the kids” – but gradually businesses everywhere are starting to realize that a LOT of potential customers live in this space, so it’s almost silly to not find a way to tap into it.

        Thanks for the comment – please feel free to reach out on Twitter and follow me (@mattchevy)

        • Eija Paajanen Reply

          Well, believe it or not, IT… On the other hand, I am not an IT person at all, and used to think that in addition to the kids, sure, the “technical IT guys” are into this kind of tools, but not the rest of us – at least not the 40+.
          Also, we operate purely in B2B business, which seems to be a much less frequently discussed side of social media. There are lots of success stories for the B2C side, but at least I haven’t come accross so many B2B ones. I guess we will have to create our own ;-)
          Now the social media seems to be at a point where it has reached far beyond the digital natives and technical experts.

  • David Meerman Scott Reply

    Hey Matt — thanks so much for the review – both the long and the short ones!

    I think that we’re now getting into a semantic issue. Much of the excellent discussion above is about “social media” which is a new term and for most people, especially those new to these ideas means “Twitter and Facebook and stuff like that.”

    But as you know, my book is about reaching buyers online. There are many tools beyond just blogs and twitter.

    Video, ebooks, photos, charts, graphs, content-rich websites, direct to consumer news releases, online media rooms are just some of the other tools.

    Should every company be on twitter? That’s not the right question. Should every company be reaching buyers online? The answer to that question is “YES”!!

    PS – second edition of my book came out last week.

    Thanks again, David

    • Mari Reply

      I haven’t read this book (sorry, David) and I probably never will (nothing against the topic, but I only have like 2 hours a week to read and I’d rather read political/historical memoirs.)

      The fact that David not only a) wrote this book, but b) cares what people are saying about it and c) comments on blog posts to connect with his readership shows me that he’s doing what he should be doing.

      Bravo.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        Agreed 100% Mari. Speaks volumes to David’s level of awareness and desire to engage with his readers.

    • Tim Jahn Reply

      “Should every company be reaching buyers online?”

      That makes more sense, David, and I agree with that more. That’s not the way Matt presented it, though, so that may have caused some confusion.

      • Bloominglater Reply

        @ Tim -

        I don’t think that there was any confusion. To your earlier point – could your wife Twitter about the kids driving her insane – sure she could – on her personal account. Should she want to enlighten others, she might write a blog post about how to help your children succeed in the classroom – tips from a teacher about to pluck her last nerve.

        the garbage man? same thing – what about him writing about turning other people’s trash into his treasure.

        there is no misunderstanding, Chev – the message is good and right on time. as people who find use in social media, it is not our jobs to stand at the gate and decide who should come in. that’s just a stupid argument in my opinion.

        thanks!

        Tiffany

        • Tim Jahn Reply

          “it is not our jobs to stand at the gate and decide who should come in. ”

          Who said anything about standing at the gate?…

          And yes, Matt did cause a misunderstanding. He said “EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media.” That’s not what David said at all. David said ” Should every company be reaching buyers online?”.

          Too TOTALLY different ideas.

          • Tim Jahn Reply

            Two, of course :)

            • Matt Cheuvront Reply

              I still stand by my initial statement that every company should be tapping into the web 2.o world – be it through blogging, Social Media, or other new media – I believe there is value to be had for any company or individual seeking it. The only misunderstanding is in semantics.

              • Tim Jahn Reply

                If we agree that we’re all lost in semantics, and “blogging, Social Media, or other new media” are all just the same thing, then nothing makes any sense.

                Weak defense, in my opinion. :)

                • Matt Cheuvront Reply

                  Where did I say they are all the same thing? I didn’t. In the post above and the comments here I say that every company should be tapping into Social Media/blogging/Web 2.0 to some extent – what that extent is varies from business to business. But you can’t prove to me that there is absolutely NO point for any company – just like I can’t prove to you that there IS some value for every company. Sometimes we just have to agree to disagree, and leave it at that.

                  • Tim Jahn Reply

                    Your initial statement wasn’t “that every company should be tapping into the web 2.o world – be it through blogging, Social Media, or other new media”.

                    Rather, it was that “New media is here – its real – and EVERY company (even yours) should be out there blogging and using Social Media.”

                    The problem, of course, is that there is no clear definition of what “new media” is or what “social media” is. Hence the idea that we’re lost in semantics.

                    Except if we just defend our statements by saying we’re lost in semantics, we’re not getting anywhere. At some point, we need to agree on a definition for “new media” and “social media”.

                    Since you didn’t do that in this post, our conversation is probably endless and a constant back and forth without any conclusion.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Hi David – thanks so much for stopping by – really speaks volumes to your level of engagement to stop by other blogs when a review pops up. People remember that sort of thing – well done.

      Agreed that your blog is about much more than what I’ve highlighted above – and I agree that we’re somewhat caught up in the semantics. At the end of the day – every company can and SHOULD be using the web to reach buyers and engage with their community.

      Thanks again for stopping by sir – and for the great read. Cheers!

    • Eija Paajanen Reply

      This book was an eye-opener for me. Great reading! I had just only started to understand that social media might be something to think about, but extending the topic to cover the whole wide selection of online marketing was really good. I must confess I used to think of social media just as “something for the kids”, but in the last months I have become to understand the various possibilities it offers. It will still require a lot of thinking to find the suitable ways to support our business, but that’s the great part of the online – you are never ready, and can always learn more. Took a practical step and opened up my Twitter account recently, just to listen and learn more.

      • Matt Cheuvront Reply

        Hi Eija – thanks for the follow. Interested in what kind of business you are in, since there has been a lot of discussion here on “should every business use social media”?

        I think that is still a widely generalized perception – that it’s something “for the kids” – but gradually businesses everywhere are starting to realize that a LOT of potential customers live in this space, so it’s almost silly to not find a way to tap into it.

        Thanks for the comment – please feel free to reach out on Twitter and follow me (@mattchevy)

        • Eija Paajanen Reply

          Well, believe it or not, IT… On the other hand, I am not an IT person at all, and used to think that in addition to the kids, sure, the “technical IT guys” are into this kind of tools, but not the rest of us – at least not the 40+.
          Also, we operate purely in B2B business, which seems to be a much less frequently discussed side of social media. There are lots of success stories for the B2C side, but at least I haven’t come accross so many B2B ones. I guess we will have to create our own ;-)
          Now the social media seems to be at a point where it has reached far beyond the digital natives and technical experts.

  • Jenny Reply

    I started the month with a quick read of “Tribes.” Now, I’m reading “The Power of Now” “Are We Rome” and “The Alchemist.” Did I mention I probably have undiagnosed a.d.d.?

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Haha, I’m the same way – I read books like blog posts – I cycle through a million different ones and struggle to finish one from cover to cover. Working on that, though…

  • Jenny Reply

    I started the month with a quick read of “Tribes.” Now, I’m reading “The Power of Now” “Are We Rome” and “The Alchemist.” Did I mention I probably have undiagnosed a.d.d.?

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Haha, I’m the same way – I read books like blog posts – I cycle through a million different ones and struggle to finish one from cover to cover. Working on that, though…

  • Simon Walsh Reply

    With regards to new media; At first i thought, if a person tweets in a forest will anybody hear it? I wasn’t sure if it was simply a case of tweeting to the converted…

    I had the good fortune to read David’s book which helped me to move away from traditional approaches to Press & PR and to understand and frankly, feel excited by New Media opportunities.

    I keep a copy of David’s book on my desk and it is a most valuable communications tool.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks for the comment Simon – a good read indeed and a fantastic introduction to new media techniques and best practices. Cheers!

  • Simon Walsh Reply

    With regards to new media; At first i thought, if a person tweets in a forest will anybody hear it? I wasn’t sure if it was simply a case of tweeting to the converted…

    I had the good fortune to read David’s book which helped me to move away from traditional approaches to Press & PR and to understand and frankly, feel excited by New Media opportunities.

    I keep a copy of David’s book on my desk and it is a most valuable communications tool.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks for the comment Simon – a good read indeed and a fantastic introduction to new media techniques and best practices. Cheers!

  • Kevin Boon Reply

    Amazing the number of business meetings I attend where people are still trying to understand how to best use social media. Creating a two-way conversation is difficult for companies to adopt since many are still in one-way, sell, sell, sell discussions.

    My feeling is companies are starting to get it. It might take a few years but there is a momentum building. Love the article and review. It’s a great book!

    Kevin

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Agreed that there are still a lot of folks “behind on the times” – I think what holds a lot of people back is that “relationship building/engagement” part doesn’t typically turn over immediate results to the bottom line. Many companies are reluctant to take that new approach and divert away from the sell-sell-sell mindset because, in short, it takes time to develop.

      But once you’ve established that relationship – that level of trust – the time spent will pay dividends.

      • Tim Jahn Reply

        “But once you’ve established that relationship – that level of trust – the time spent will pay dividends.”

        Do you have any example of brands that you have such a relationship with, where your trust in them is paying them in dividends? Relationships are the hot topic these days, but you don’t often find examples. Curious.

        • Matt Cheuvront Reply

          Big businesses, no – can’t think of a direct example – but small companies, hell yes. We can start close to home with Mari (@foiledcupcakes). This is someone (now a great friend) who never once tried to sell me anything – they only thing she cared about was building a relationship and becoming a friend – I trusted her and her company long before I ever approached her about catering my wedding – and I knew we would end up going with them before we ever sat down to do a tasting. That’s a prime example of how a GENUINE relationship-building approach can pay dividends – for both parties involved.

          The same can be said for a local coffee shop in Nashville – @uglymugs – I never knew the place existed until I found them on Twitter – and I was never interested until I read a blog post about crowd sourcing their logo and tagline (and thought it was an innovative approach at the time).

          The bottom line – there are a LOT of companies out there who get it, and a lot that don’t. But that “building relationship” piece is especially important for small businesses and startups looking to compete with their larger “corporate” competition.

          • Tim Jahn Reply

            Totally agreed with Mari. I’m not familiar with the coffee shop you mention but I imagine they’ve got something great going there too. I really do believe small businesses have the power to harness relationships and turn that into earned revenue.

            But neither of us can come up with any big corporation examples. I hear lots of talk about how companies of all sizes should be worried about trust and relationships. I wish we had some examples of bigger companies doing this. I’m just as curious as you are.

            Anybody have any examples of big companies they really trust and have developed a relationship with? Where that relationship is generating more revenue for the big company?

        • Mari Reply

          It’s interesting that the conversation here is focused on B2C relationships. But what about internal employee relationships?

          (Since there’s no “new media” definition, I’m going to quote David’s comment above and use his loose definition: “Video, ebooks, photos, charts, graphs, content-rich websites, direct to consumer news releases, online media rooms”) (side note – sorry if this is taken out of context, since I didn’t read the book.)

          I’m currently taking Marketing of Services at U of Chicago. The one resounding takeaway from the past 3 lectures: the level of satisfaction your employees experience is directly correlated with the level of satisfaction your customers experience.

          Tim, you ask for examples of corporate brands that use social/new media to create relationships that translate into dividends. Looking at it from a different angle, here are some examples that support internal communication:

          1 – Comprehensive internal web forums to encourage relationships among employees, such as special interest groups (book clubs, tennis, softball, etc.)
          2 – Internal blog posts written by employees to give their peers insight on corporate policies (i.e., disability awareness or cultural tolerance). Any employee can make comments about the blog post and foster discussion.
          3 – Internal networking platforms. BP currently employs an internal Facebook-style application; employees in London and Singapore participate in iPhone apps discussions and vacation exchanges.
          4 – Benefits analysis. Choosing health plans, investments, corporate partnership benefits, relocation advice – all via two-way forums, web videos, and blog posts with open discussion.

          While the companies I pull examples from (HP, Intel, Google, Sysco, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Target, BP, McDonald’s) may not directly engage with their end consumers using our social media tools (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, who knows what else), they certainly do engage with their employees.

          Engaged employees = committed employees = a stronger brand = greater market share = higher profits = literal dividends to shareholders.

          • Matt Cheuvront Reply

            This is spot on Mari – and amidst all the back and forth about semantics with Tim throughout this post, this is exactly what I meant – how you define Social Media and how I define it can be very different things. Our company is doing almost everything you mentioned above internally.

            1) Monthly internal e-newsletter (“Social” Media)
            2) Social Network to collaborate on tasks, track to-do’s, etc called On the System (“Social” Media)
            3) Another social network for the management team to track KPI’s of their respective teams on a weekly basis (“Social” Media).

            Not to mention everything we are doing with blogging, and more “generalized” Social Media like Twitter and Facebook.

            I think it is silly to group it all into “Twitter” – that is one of MANY tools out there. The bottom lines is, Social Media comes in a wide variety of broad and very niche platforms, and I still stand by my initial statement that every company (yes every) can find value in integrating Social Media into their strategy. Well said Mari.

  • Kevin Boon Reply

    Amazing the number of business meetings I attend where people are still trying to understand how to best use social media. Creating a two-way conversation is difficult for companies to adopt since many are still in one-way, sell, sell, sell discussions.

    My feeling is companies are starting to get it. It might take a few years but there is a momentum building. Love the article and review. It’s a great book!

    Kevin

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Agreed that there are still a lot of folks “behind on the times” – I think what holds a lot of people back is that “relationship building/engagement” part doesn’t typically turn over immediate results to the bottom line. Many companies are reluctant to take that new approach and divert away from the sell-sell-sell mindset because, in short, it takes time to develop.

      But once you’ve established that relationship – that level of trust – the time spent will pay dividends.

      • Tim Jahn Reply

        “But once you’ve established that relationship – that level of trust – the time spent will pay dividends.”

        Do you have any example of brands that you have such a relationship with, where your trust in them is paying them in dividends? Relationships are the hot topic these days, but you don’t often find examples. Curious.

        • Matt Cheuvront Reply

          Big businesses, no – can’t think of a direct example – but small companies, hell yes. We can start close to home with Mari (@foiledcupcakes). This is someone (now a great friend) who never once tried to sell me anything – they only thing she cared about was building a relationship and becoming a friend – I trusted her and her company long before I ever approached her about catering my wedding – and I knew we would end up going with them before we ever sat down to do a tasting. That’s a prime example of how a GENUINE relationship-building approach can pay dividends – for both parties involved.

          The same can be said for a local coffee shop in Nashville – @uglymugs – I never knew the place existed until I found them on Twitter – and I was never interested until I read a blog post about crowd sourcing their logo and tagline (and thought it was an innovative approach at the time).

          The bottom line – there are a LOT of companies out there who get it, and a lot that don’t. But that “building relationship” piece is especially important for small businesses and startups looking to compete with their larger “corporate” competition.

          • Tim Jahn Reply

            Totally agreed with Mari. I’m not familiar with the coffee shop you mention but I imagine they’ve got something great going there too. I really do believe small businesses have the power to harness relationships and turn that into earned revenue.

            But neither of us can come up with any big corporation examples. I hear lots of talk about how companies of all sizes should be worried about trust and relationships. I wish we had some examples of bigger companies doing this. I’m just as curious as you are.

            Anybody have any examples of big companies they really trust and have developed a relationship with? Where that relationship is generating more revenue for the big company?

        • Mari Reply

          It’s interesting that the conversation here is focused on B2C relationships. But what about internal employee relationships?

          (Since there’s no “new media” definition, I’m going to quote David’s comment above and use his loose definition: “Video, ebooks, photos, charts, graphs, content-rich websites, direct to consumer news releases, online media rooms”) (side note – sorry if this is taken out of context, since I didn’t read the book.)

          I’m currently taking Marketing of Services at U of Chicago. The one resounding takeaway from the past 3 lectures: the level of satisfaction your employees experience is directly correlated with the level of satisfaction your customers experience.

          Tim, you ask for examples of corporate brands that use social/new media to create relationships that translate into dividends. Looking at it from a different angle, here are some examples that support internal communication:

          1 – Comprehensive internal web forums to encourage relationships among employees, such as special interest groups (book clubs, tennis, softball, etc.)
          2 – Internal blog posts written by employees to give their peers insight on corporate policies (i.e., disability awareness or cultural tolerance). Any employee can make comments about the blog post and foster discussion.
          3 – Internal networking platforms. BP currently employs an internal Facebook-style application; employees in London and Singapore participate in iPhone apps discussions and vacation exchanges.
          4 – Benefits analysis. Choosing health plans, investments, corporate partnership benefits, relocation advice – all via two-way forums, web videos, and blog posts with open discussion.

          While the companies I pull examples from (HP, Intel, Google, Sysco, Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, Target, BP, McDonald’s) may not directly engage with their end consumers using our social media tools (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, who knows what else), they certainly do engage with their employees.

          Engaged employees = committed employees = a stronger brand = greater market share = higher profits = literal dividends to shareholders.

          • Matt Cheuvront Reply

            This is spot on Mari – and amidst all the back and forth about semantics with Tim throughout this post, this is exactly what I meant – how you define Social Media and how I define it can be very different things. Our company is doing almost everything you mentioned above internally.

            1) Monthly internal e-newsletter (“Social” Media)
            2) Social Network to collaborate on tasks, track to-do’s, etc called On the System (“Social” Media)
            3) Another social network for the management team to track KPI’s of their respective teams on a weekly basis (“Social” Media).

            Not to mention everything we are doing with blogging, and more “generalized” Social Media like Twitter and Facebook.

            I think it is silly to group it all into “Twitter” – that is one of MANY tools out there. The bottom lines is, Social Media comes in a wide variety of broad and very niche platforms, and I still stand by my initial statement that every company (yes every) can find value in integrating Social Media into their strategy. Well said Mari.

  • jenniferalaine Reply

    Love this! Thanks Matt. I’m adding it to my Amazon list right now!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Awesome! Once you’ve read – feel free to come back and share some of your own thoughts. And if you have any suggestions on good reading for me (and everyone else) give us a heads up – I know I am always looking for good recommendations.

  • jenniferalaine Reply

    Love this! Thanks Matt. I’m adding it to my Amazon list right now!

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Awesome! Once you’ve read – feel free to come back and share some of your own thoughts. And if you have any suggestions on good reading for me (and everyone else) give us a heads up – I know I am always looking for good recommendations.

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