Stop Dreaming. Start Living.We are victims of circumstance. We are products of our surroundings. We evolve based on our environment. Any of these phrases ring a bell? Growing up – many of us are told that our dreams are too big – that we’re aiming too high, that we just can’t do it  and our expectations should be lowered.

Doubt is a common emotion within all of us – we doubt our own potential for greatness and our ability to do good and rise above. We’re in a constant battle with self-worry, doubt, and confusion – the thoughts that seek to hold us back and limit our potential. What worries us and brings upon doubt within us? It’s the idea that we must be unique in order to be successful. Your potential for greatness is limitless once you realize that it’s not about being unique, it’s about being the best.

The blogging perspective

Think about it as a blogger. Look at me for example. On Life Without Pants I’ve written about the topics of social media, work/life balance, and personal growth – these topics aren’t anything new, we’ve all read varying perspectives on them from all over the web. But, what I (hope) I’ve done, and what I strive for is to be better than other blogs, to present a fresh perspective. It may be something you already know a lot about, something you might already have a very strong opinion on. My goal is to take those thoughts and opinions you’ve already developed and help you mold them into a more well-rounded, educated idea. Shedding new light and making you think.

The business perspective

Take a look at it from a business perspective. Think about a local coffee shop that you frequent in your home town. Do you make the trip there every morning on your way to work because they’ve invented a new coffee bean? No. Odds are, they’re making a better latte than Starbucks for a few cents cheaper. When you go in, the staff is welcoming and accommodating – they know you by name, you’re favorite Radiohead CD is playing in the background, there’s a little booth in the corner that you love to sit at on the weekends to work on homework. Good coffee + cheaper price + friendly atmosphere = better experience. You keep going back and choosing Joe’s Coffee Shop over Starbucks because not necessarily because they’re unique – but because they do what they do better than the competition.

Conventional wisdom holds that companies must offer their customers something truly unique in order to win their business and loyalty. In truth, successful businesses offer them something simpler but much more important.MIT Sloan Management Review

Everything’s been done before. Get over it.

You’re limiting yourself by saying ‘It’s already been done before’. Odds are, almost anything you can think of, someone has thought of already. That brilliant idea you have? Someone’s been there and done that. How many times have had an amazing idea  only to find there are 10 other people out there already doing the same thing? Stop worrying about what others are doing and start focusing on how to make your idea better than the rest. Spend more time on marketing and promoting. Go above and beyond and really focus on connecting with your readers, fans, and/or customers. You may not be innovative in your ‘product’ but you can always have an innovative approach.

When someone opens their Google Reader – give them a reason to click on your blog first. When a business is deciding what consulting firm they should hire – give them all the reasons in the world why they should pick you over a big agency. Being the best isn’t about being ‘new’ – it’s not even about having the most experience, it’s about being bold, standing out, rising above the mediocrity, and going that extra step.

Your status and wealth doesn’t determine your success. Don’t let your circumstance dictate who you are. Have confidence in your ability to do exceptional things and the sky’s the limit!

Join the conversation! 46 Comments

  1. Matt,

    First, just one small nit to pick – in my mind, people who do exceptional things all the time are, by definition, not mediocre people! :-)

    Second, as usual, you have written a terrific post. You hit the nail on the head when you talk about that focus on connecting with the people you want to serve and creating that better experience. A lot of us – myself included – are in a service business of one form or another. One of the basics of services marketing is that people don’t really know how good the service is until after they’ve tried it. So creating that terrific experience and then building connections with customers who will provide word of mouth (now word of Twitter) referrals is a key way to differentiate ourselves from the competition. Your coffee shop example is a great one – when you go to a place where everyone knows your name, you will return, and you will tell your friends. Nice post!

    Reply
    • John – thank you for your feedback. A little explanation on the ‘mediocre people’ concept. It’s my belief that you and I, everyone else reading this, not one of us is more ‘exceptional’ than the other. It’s the things you do that make you exceptional – it’s pushing harder, showing more dedication, adding more value, whatever the case may be, it’s not who you are, but what you do, that defines you. As Stuart says below, the idea of ‘being exceptional’ is all relative.

      We see eye to eye on the concept of services marketing. It seems so basic, but we cut ourselves short far too often when we see an idea has already been thought of by someone else. It’s not the idea itself, its how you present it and market it, enhancing the perceived value. Even if something costs more, if people perceive it to be more valuable, they’ll spend the extra buck. If you give a customer a higher return on investment, they’re more willing to make that investment again and again.

      Reply
  2. Matt,

    First, just one small nit to pick – in my mind, people who do exceptional things all the time are, by definition, not mediocre people! :-)

    Second, as usual, you have written a terrific post. You hit the nail on the head when you talk about that focus on connecting with the people you want to serve and creating that better experience. A lot of us – myself included – are in a service business of one form or another. One of the basics of services marketing is that people don’t really know how good the service is until after they’ve tried it. So creating that terrific experience and then building connections with customers who will provide word of mouth (now word of Twitter) referrals is a key way to differentiate ourselves from the competition. Your coffee shop example is a great one – when you go to a place where everyone knows your name, you will return, and you will tell your friends. Nice post!

    Reply
    • John – thank you for your feedback. A little explanation on the ‘mediocre people’ concept. It’s my belief that you and I, everyone else reading this, not one of us is more ‘exceptional’ than the other. It’s the things you do that make you exceptional – it’s pushing harder, showing more dedication, adding more value, whatever the case may be, it’s not who you are, but what you do, that defines you. As Stuart says below, the idea of ‘being exceptional’ is all relative.

      We see eye to eye on the concept of services marketing. It seems so basic, but we cut ourselves short far too often when we see an idea has already been thought of by someone else. It’s not the idea itself, its how you present it and market it, enhancing the perceived value. Even if something costs more, if people perceive it to be more valuable, they’ll spend the extra buck. If you give a customer a higher return on investment, they’re more willing to make that investment again and again.

      Reply
  3. Good thoughts-and I have to second “spending more time on marketing and promoting”. Like the coffee shops, a novel concept doesn’t trump connecting with people. Offering people a singular experience ensures that you stand out above the rest in those minds-truly worth the effort.

    I might add that lacking success in being the best is often the result of lacking (constructive) experiences like the failures/achievements that help us evaluate ourselves. You have to get your whole self wet in the world’s waters and taste a bit before you can know their ebb and flow. The skills we gain in these experiences help us define what we enjoy, what we’re really good at, and what we need to be better.

    Splash around with your dreams. Spend time in their pursuit, giving much thought to what you require to be the best; then, you will have the tools to broaden your possibilities. You decide how far you go.

    Reply
    • I like the way you think Chelsie – we really do have to be willing to put ourselves out there, get our feet wet, hell – sometimes even take a risk and dive in head first to test the market ‘waters’. The old saying of ‘you never know until you try’ rings true. You never know how an idea will be received until you have the confidence to put it out there and gain some feedback.

      Being the best means offering something that everyone else isn’t. And it doesn’t have to be huge or monumental. I like to think of it as offering each customer/client/blog reader a singular ‘signature’ experience. Something that leaves a (good) taste in their mouth and will keep them coming back for more.

      Reply
  4. Good thoughts-and I have to second “spending more time on marketing and promoting”. Like the coffee shops, a novel concept doesn’t trump connecting with people. Offering people a singular experience ensures that you stand out above the rest in those minds-truly worth the effort.

    I might add that lacking success in being the best is often the result of lacking (constructive) experiences like the failures/achievements that help us evaluate ourselves. You have to get your whole self wet in the world’s waters and taste a bit before you can know their ebb and flow. The skills we gain in these experiences help us define what we enjoy, what we’re really good at, and what we need to be better.

    Splash around with your dreams. Spend time in their pursuit, giving much thought to what you require to be the best; then, you will have the tools to broaden your possibilities. You decide how far you go.

    Reply
    • I like the way you think Chelsie – we really do have to be willing to put ourselves out there, get our feet wet, hell – sometimes even take a risk and dive in head first to test the market ‘waters’. The old saying of ‘you never know until you try’ rings true. You never know how an idea will be received until you have the confidence to put it out there and gain some feedback.

      Being the best means offering something that everyone else isn’t. And it doesn’t have to be huge or monumental. I like to think of it as offering each customer/client/blog reader a singular ‘signature’ experience. Something that leaves a (good) taste in their mouth and will keep them coming back for more.

      Reply
  5. Mediocrity is all relative. I like to think of myself as mediocre for the singular purpose of striving for excellence. (I ascribe to the Bill Belicheck model of “1 game at a time”)

    If you just work towards excellence often you achieve it.

    Reply
    • Good point Stuart – and you’re right, mediocrity is all relative, and truly in the eye of the beholder. As I said in my response to John above, we are all ‘mediocre people’ CAPABLE of exceptional things. Me just being me doesn’t make me exceptional. Being born into a family with more money or a higher status doesn’t make me any more exceptional than someone living on the streets. It’s what we do that defines us – it’s striving for excellence in everything that, in fact, makes YOU an excellent human being.

      Reply
  6. Mediocrity is all relative. I like to think of myself as mediocre for the singular purpose of striving for excellence. (I ascribe to the Bill Belicheck model of “1 game at a time”)

    If you just work towards excellence often you achieve it.

    Reply
    • Good point Stuart – and you’re right, mediocrity is all relative, and truly in the eye of the beholder. As I said in my response to John above, we are all ‘mediocre people’ CAPABLE of exceptional things. Me just being me doesn’t make me exceptional. Being born into a family with more money or a higher status doesn’t make me any more exceptional than someone living on the streets. It’s what we do that defines us – it’s striving for excellence in everything that, in fact, makes YOU an excellent human being.

      Reply
  7. Matt, insightful as always. I’m curious, when you say, “Your potential for greatness is limitless once you realize that it’s not about being unique, it’s about being the best,” do you mean that being unique doesn’t matter? Or that we shouldn’t focus so much on being unique and hinging our success on that one factor?

    While I agree that we should all strive to be the best, I think being unique is also important. Everything’s been done before, get over it…totally true! We shouldn’t waste time constantly comparing ourselves to others and worrying about being the first and the only one to have an idea. Sure, it’s rare that we will we come up with an idea that hasn’t been thought of before, but it’s how we present it, and what we make of it that determines our success. How can we take the idea and make it better? It seems like being unique and being the best go hand in hand.

    I love the message of pursuing your dreams and not letting your circumstances hold you back. After all, we only have this one life, so what are we waiting for? Great advice!

    Reply
    • You got it Sam! It’s not that being unique and innovative isn’t important, it definitely is – but in order to be successful, you don’t have to be the first one to report a story, the first one to come out with a social networking site. You just have to be the best – look at what Facebook did to Myspace, and now what Twitter is doing to Facebook. Yes, there are niches’ for each of these, but each one has focused on making this simpler, more efficient, and better than it’s predecessor.

      Too often we hit a wall when we see our ‘brilliant’ idea has already been done. But that shouldn’t stop you – you have to get past that and figure out a way to make your version better than the rest. That’s why I say being excellent isn’t synonymous with being unique – you can achieve excellence by being the best at what you do.

      Reply
  8. Matt, insightful as always. I’m curious, when you say, “Your potential for greatness is limitless once you realize that it’s not about being unique, it’s about being the best,” do you mean that being unique doesn’t matter? Or that we shouldn’t focus so much on being unique and hinging our success on that one factor?

    While I agree that we should all strive to be the best, I think being unique is also important. Everything’s been done before, get over it…totally true! We shouldn’t waste time constantly comparing ourselves to others and worrying about being the first and the only one to have an idea. Sure, it’s rare that we will we come up with an idea that hasn’t been thought of before, but it’s how we present it, and what we make of it that determines our success. How can we take the idea and make it better? It seems like being unique and being the best go hand in hand.

    I love the message of pursuing your dreams and not letting your circumstances hold you back. After all, we only have this one life, so what are we waiting for? Great advice!

    Reply
    • You got it Sam! It’s not that being unique and innovative isn’t important, it definitely is – but in order to be successful, you don’t have to be the first one to report a story, the first one to come out with a social networking site. You just have to be the best – look at what Facebook did to Myspace, and now what Twitter is doing to Facebook. Yes, there are niches’ for each of these, but each one has focused on making this simpler, more efficient, and better than it’s predecessor.

      Too often we hit a wall when we see our ‘brilliant’ idea has already been done. But that shouldn’t stop you – you have to get past that and figure out a way to make your version better than the rest. That’s why I say being excellent isn’t synonymous with being unique – you can achieve excellence by being the best at what you do.

      Reply
  9. Great post Matt. I agree that it is important to get out of your own way. It has been said many times that successful entrepreneurs favor action to research. More specifically, this means that you will learn much more by actually doing what you are passionate about instead of reading about how to do it. This is an important distinction to make in order to have a more successful life in general. So do whatever you are passionate about, start right now!

    Reply
    • I agree Ben. Nothing can replace actually getting out there and doing something. Research is important – you don’t want to invest time and money into something that hasn’t been substantiated with research, but most of the research should be hand out – actually getting out there, getting your hands dirty, and seeing what happens. If you ‘fail’ (note – failure is a term that’s relative to all of us) – you’ll learn something from it, pick yourself up, and know what NOT to do next time. Cheers to you Ben and thanks for the call-to-action!

      Reply
  10. Great post Matt. I agree that it is important to get out of your own way. It has been said many times that successful entrepreneurs favor action to research. More specifically, this means that you will learn much more by actually doing what you are passionate about instead of reading about how to do it. This is an important distinction to make in order to have a more successful life in general. So do whatever you are passionate about, start right now!

    Reply
    • I agree Ben. Nothing can replace actually getting out there and doing something. Research is important – you don’t want to invest time and money into something that hasn’t been substantiated with research, but most of the research should be hand out – actually getting out there, getting your hands dirty, and seeing what happens. If you ‘fail’ (note – failure is a term that’s relative to all of us) – you’ll learn something from it, pick yourself up, and know what NOT to do next time. Cheers to you Ben and thanks for the call-to-action!

      Reply
  11. Another great post :) I just had to comment and say that I love the OK GO lyric reference. But, if a mediocre person does something exceptional – then aren’t they really an exceptional person just finally reaching their potential?

    I do agree that you do not need to be unique to be successful – and that it is about putting your all in to it.

    Reply
    • I was wondering if someone would pick up on the OK GO reference. +1 bonus point for pointing that out. I also agree with your assessment – I think my initial approach was a little pessimistic – saying we’re all at the same level of mediocrity and that it’s the things we do that makes us exceptional, not who we are. But I like your point of view better, siding with optimism – that we all are exceptional, simply waiting to break out and realize our own potential.

      Two different ways of approaching the idea with the common thread that our actions define us. Thanks for the comment Morgan!

      Reply
  12. Another great post :) I just had to comment and say that I love the OK GO lyric reference. But, if a mediocre person does something exceptional – then aren’t they really an exceptional person just finally reaching their potential?

    I do agree that you do not need to be unique to be successful – and that it is about putting your all in to it.

    Reply
    • I was wondering if someone would pick up on the OK GO reference. +1 bonus point for pointing that out. I also agree with your assessment – I think my initial approach was a little pessimistic – saying we’re all at the same level of mediocrity and that it’s the things we do that makes us exceptional, not who we are. But I like your point of view better, siding with optimism – that we all are exceptional, simply waiting to break out and realize our own potential.

      Two different ways of approaching the idea with the common thread that our actions define us. Thanks for the comment Morgan!

      Reply
  13. We’ve often heard that being perfect is the enemy of whats possible. I think this applies to us more than ever. Its important to run down the path of dreams to achieve them. Every great idea/ product starts off as good and is then chiselled over time to be close to perfect! The pursuit of perfection becomes too often adequate reason for inaction. Yes average people do exceptional things, but in doing so pull the average up a notch! Insightful post Matt!

    Reply
    • Great point as always Anita – I love your ability to sprinkle in some added wisdom to every conversation. I think what we’re seeing over time is the ‘excellence’ bar continually being raised. It’s one improvement and innovation after another – the competition and collective ingenuity brings out the best in all of us. Even as a blog writer, I see the amazing content all of you are putting out and it challenges me to dig deeper, try harder, and put extra effort into developing my ideas into relevant content with valuable take-aways. In short, we make each other better – and hopefully, that’s something that will inevitably continue.

      Reply
  14. We’ve often heard that being perfect is the enemy of whats possible. I think this applies to us more than ever. Its important to run down the path of dreams to achieve them. Every great idea/ product starts off as good and is then chiselled over time to be close to perfect! The pursuit of perfection becomes too often adequate reason for inaction. Yes average people do exceptional things, but in doing so pull the average up a notch! Insightful post Matt!

    Reply
    • Great point as always Anita – I love your ability to sprinkle in some added wisdom to every conversation. I think what we’re seeing over time is the ‘excellence’ bar continually being raised. It’s one improvement and innovation after another – the competition and collective ingenuity brings out the best in all of us. Even as a blog writer, I see the amazing content all of you are putting out and it challenges me to dig deeper, try harder, and put extra effort into developing my ideas into relevant content with valuable take-aways. In short, we make each other better – and hopefully, that’s something that will inevitably continue.

      Reply
  15. So true. What truly differentiates the best from the good from the bad is nothing but luck and hard work. Understanding that innovation doesn’t need to be technological but personal, that it doesn’t need to be about productivity or content, but about feelings.

    Being unique is not impossible, but is statistically ridiculous to aim for that. Being better than the rest and hte best you can be, is a much safer bet. Yeah, in this case safe is ok!

    You’re right on many things here Matt, this is a fantastic post.

    Reply
    • Well said Carlos – we all won’t be product innovators – but we can all be innovative thinkers, marketers, advertisers, and sellers of our product, service, or work.

      You bring up an interesting point about luck. I wonder, how big of a factor does luck play in all of this? There seems to be a fine line in what some would consider hard work paying off to what others see as ‘being lucky’ – how can you differentiate between the two? Is half the battle being at the right place at the right time? Some things to think about. The role luck plays in our successes.

      Reply
  16. So true. What truly differentiates the best from the good from the bad is nothing but luck and hard work. Understanding that innovation doesn’t need to be technological but personal, that it doesn’t need to be about productivity or content, but about feelings.

    Being unique is not impossible, but is statistically ridiculous to aim for that. Being better than the rest and hte best you can be, is a much safer bet. Yeah, in this case safe is ok!

    You’re right on many things here Matt, this is a fantastic post.

    Reply
    • Well said Carlos – we all won’t be product innovators – but we can all be innovative thinkers, marketers, advertisers, and sellers of our product, service, or work.

      You bring up an interesting point about luck. I wonder, how big of a factor does luck play in all of this? There seems to be a fine line in what some would consider hard work paying off to what others see as ‘being lucky’ – how can you differentiate between the two? Is half the battle being at the right place at the right time? Some things to think about. The role luck plays in our successes.

      Reply
  17. And here’s some more food for thought.

    We want to work with people we LIKE better also.

    For me I’m usually going to read the BEST first (especially if it’s easy to digest, see: Seth Godin), but then instead of reading the second best, I’m going to read all the people that have made the effort to connect with me.

    Everything has been done before – chances are even better than you could do it, so yeah, your own spin is crucial, but so are your efforts to connect with people and provide value to their lives.

    Reply
    • Ryan – the foundation of ALL good business is relationships. I preach this time and time again – it’s those businesses, writers, and entrepreneurs who take the time to CONNECT with their consumers and audience that prove to be the most successful. Establishing these connections adds to the overall value and builds a positive community ‘brand’ around what you’re promoting.

      This belief is evident in the community atmosphere I actively promote here – I’m down in the trenches with all of you – not standing above as some omnipotent blog writer laying down the law for all of you to absorb. I want my readers to understand and believe that there is as much valuable content in the comments and discussion as there is in the posts themselves.

      Thanks for coming by Ryan – always appreciated – and I’ll try to keep things easy to digest here, or at least do my best to stay on your good side!

      Reply
  18. And here’s some more food for thought.

    We want to work with people we LIKE better also.

    For me I’m usually going to read the BEST first (especially if it’s easy to digest, see: Seth Godin), but then instead of reading the second best, I’m going to read all the people that have made the effort to connect with me.

    Everything has been done before – chances are even better than you could do it, so yeah, your own spin is crucial, but so are your efforts to connect with people and provide value to their lives.

    Reply
    • Ryan – the foundation of ALL good business is relationships. I preach this time and time again – it’s those businesses, writers, and entrepreneurs who take the time to CONNECT with their consumers and audience that prove to be the most successful. Establishing these connections adds to the overall value and builds a positive community ‘brand’ around what you’re promoting.

      This belief is evident in the community atmosphere I actively promote here – I’m down in the trenches with all of you – not standing above as some omnipotent blog writer laying down the law for all of you to absorb. I want my readers to understand and believe that there is as much valuable content in the comments and discussion as there is in the posts themselves.

      Thanks for coming by Ryan – always appreciated – and I’ll try to keep things easy to digest here, or at least do my best to stay on your good side!

      Reply
  19. Matt,

    You are absolutely right; it is all about relationships. The most effective managers I have known are the ones who take the time to get to know the people who work for them and help those people become successful.

    If you think about it, the same applies to our personal relationships. The investment we make in getting to know someone else and really trying to understand him or her pays dividends.

    And what I find so refreshing about you and those who have commented here and on the other post you have inspired is that you all have a clear sense of the importance of relationships! Not everyone gets that.

    Reply
    • It’s all about give and take John. I know you don’t need me to tell you that. But whether we’re looking at our personal or professional relationships, you get what you give. You’re right – not everyone get’s this concept. Many companies and individuals play the numbers game – acting in a broad sweeping motion in order to influence or at least reach as many people as possible. Personally – I would much rather have excellent relationships with a few (friends, clients, whomever) than a weak connection with many. Someday, this master philosophy will be put to good (and profitable) use. You just wait!

      Reply
  20. Matt,

    You are absolutely right; it is all about relationships. The most effective managers I have known are the ones who take the time to get to know the people who work for them and help those people become successful.

    If you think about it, the same applies to our personal relationships. The investment we make in getting to know someone else and really trying to understand him or her pays dividends.

    And what I find so refreshing about you and those who have commented here and on the other post you have inspired is that you all have a clear sense of the importance of relationships! Not everyone gets that.

    Reply
    • It’s all about give and take John. I know you don’t need me to tell you that. But whether we’re looking at our personal or professional relationships, you get what you give. You’re right – not everyone get’s this concept. Many companies and individuals play the numbers game – acting in a broad sweeping motion in order to influence or at least reach as many people as possible. Personally – I would much rather have excellent relationships with a few (friends, clients, whomever) than a weak connection with many. Someday, this master philosophy will be put to good (and profitable) use. You just wait!

      Reply
  21. Does doing something exceptional with your mediocrity excel you to a higher level of mediocrity (perhaps even pull you out of the mediocre pool?) I’m very vocal about that today, apparently. :)

    Reply
    • @Elisa – I think Morgan’s point above spells it out best. We are all ‘excellent’ people, capable of great things. But it’s up to ‘realize our potential’. We all have it, but it takes passion, drive, and determination to unearth that excellence within ourselves, to be the best we can be. We’re either mediocre people striving to do exceptional things or exceptional people on course toward realizing our potential. Either way you look at it – it’s a journey, and it can only be fully realized by you. No one else can ‘figure it all out’ for you.

      Reply
  22. Does doing something exceptional with your mediocrity excel you to a higher level of mediocrity (perhaps even pull you out of the mediocre pool?) I’m very vocal about that today, apparently. :)

    Reply
    • @Elisa – I think Morgan’s point above spells it out best. We are all ‘excellent’ people, capable of great things. But it’s up to ‘realize our potential’. We all have it, but it takes passion, drive, and determination to unearth that excellence within ourselves, to be the best we can be. We’re either mediocre people striving to do exceptional things or exceptional people on course toward realizing our potential. Either way you look at it – it’s a journey, and it can only be fully realized by you. No one else can ‘figure it all out’ for you.

      Reply
  23. I think it is very important for us. It can be use in daily life, all types of business.

    Reply
  24. Its not that the over abundance of mediocrity in the masses that is the problem, it is level of delusion, in that people tend to overinflate their relative worth. A common question in any introductory sociology class, is asking the students anonymously to categorize their relative standing in life. Typically 90% will respond with above average which of course deifies statistical logic. Its not just students with inflated self worth, this trend crosses into the general populace. Most people are varying degrees of average, and IMO, there are only 3 things which allow a person to hold a lofty self opinion.

    1. Better than normal talent (natural talent vs acquired skill)
    2. Better than normal accomplishment (hard work plus talent)
    3. Better than normal looks (humans are visual creatures)

    There is nothing wrong with being average, after all the road most traveled is less stressful, and their will be no shortage of company along the way. A certain level of luck is involved in anything you do in life, but luck should not be over stated, as it can become both an excuse (by those that fail or do not try), and brush off (by those that stuck in their own rut).

    Luck is more about preparation meeting opportunity, yes a cliche, but not without reason. the people I have met who were truly successful, all shared certain traits.

    1. Hard work (above average)
    2. Risk taking (above average)
    3. Holding onto their dream (not letting naysayers hold them back)
    4. Ability to focus (being able to see through the clutter)
    5. Following the 2 P’s (perseverance and patience). .
    6. Humility (despite being decidedly un-average)

    There are many variables involved to achieve success, and by no means is it defined solely by financial gain.
    For me success can be mean many-things, but mostly it is living life on your own terms. What it is not, is being contented mediocre sheep with an overinflated ego.

    Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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