How Do You Sell Social Media?

How Do You Sell Social Media?We can talk about the allure of social media all day long. Odds are, if you’re reading this – you’re a believer in the social medium as an effective tool to network, share information, and build relationships. There’s virtually no limit to the amount you can learn or number of friends you can make online. With a little time and effort, anyone can become an ‘internet celebrity’.

Teaching an old dog new tricks

Businesses are starting to catch on. They’re seeing social media as a viable marketing option for their company. Companies who have been taking a traditional marketing approach for years are finally realizing the added value of online PR: The ability to pinpoint and target specific demographics combined with the transparency, interaction, and personality social media adds to a brand – it all sounds great. But as much as people want to believe in social media, most still don’t get it.

So what does that mean? They’re finding people who do “get it” – you and me – to step in and launch their company into the web stratosphere. While some companies outsource their web-marketing approach, the (smart ones) are bringing someone in house. They want someone who is saturated within the company culture, products, and people – believes in it – and can effectively engage and interact with the target customer community.

Getting your company 5,000 Twitter followers sounds great, 1,000 RSS subscribers for your blog looks impressive, but what does that add to the bottom line? Your CEO wants to know, “Why am I paying you if you aren’t providing me with tangible results? If social media isn’t making me any money, what’s the point?

My thoughts

Not unlike other mediums, social media is a tool. A valuable and extremely interactive tool – It helps you talk to people you otherwise would have never had the opportunity to. It can provide that first step in lead generation – allowing potential clients and customers to get to know you before REALLY getting to know you. It gets people in the door – and through analytics management, is highly measurable and customizable. Not to mention, there is an extremely low overhead, one person in house can go a long way. In short, it’s a supplement, a new approach, and another piece to the marketing puzzle.

What do you think?

I leave the floor open for discussion: What are the unique benefits of social media and web marketing? How does the web compare to other more traditional forms of advertising/PR (print, TV, radio, etc)? How do YOU sell social media?


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50 Responses
  • Stuart Reply

    I agree with this, although (as I know all to well) it is SO HARD to sell Social Media to companies. They have all heard of it and all want to get into it although its the key decision makers (with the financial control) who are finding it hard to monetise it. They are happy to throw heaps of money at unmeasureable media and PR activities which they ahve used for years, that they are going to get little out of but when it comes to Social Media they are very stern and unforgiving about putting any money into it (even though it is relitivly cheap and in some cases costs nothing!). but nothing in life is easy! lets hope that the waters change as more people start to implement their own successful Social Media campaigns.

    • Matt Reply

      It amazes me how many companies out there continue to abide by that ‘if it ain’t broke don’t fix it’ mentality. The problem is – old school media is broke, or at least not as effective as some forms of new media can be. With that said, we are witnessing a changing of the guard, more people are jumping on board – now whether or not they are doing so effectively is an entirely different conversation.

  • Stuart Reply

    I agree with this, although (as I know all to well) it is SO HARD to sell Social Media to companies. They have all heard of it and all want to get into it although its the key decision makers (with the financial control) who are finding it hard to monetise it. They are happy to throw heaps of money at unmeasureable media and PR activities which they ahve used for years, that they are going to get little out of but when it comes to Social Media they are very stern and unforgiving about putting any money into it (even though it is relitivly cheap and in some cases costs nothing!). but nothing in life is easy! lets hope that the waters change as more people start to implement their own successful Social Media campaigns.

    • Matt Reply

      It amazes me how many companies out there continue to abide by that ‘if it ain’t broke don’t fix it’ mentality. The problem is – old school media is broke, or at least not as effective as some forms of new media can be. With that said, we are witnessing a changing of the guard, more people are jumping on board – now whether or not they are doing so effectively is an entirely different conversation.

  • Ted Reply

    Selling social media to management has to become a business case. It can’t be argued in terms of “branding,” “connecting,” or “listening” (not to management). It needs to be argued like this: “If you let me allocate 10 hours a week to social media for the next 6 months, I can bring on 15 new clients and decrease client turnover by 23%, thus increasing revenue by $80,000.” Make a business case and back it up – that sells.

    • Matt Reply

      I 100% agree – that was the theme behind this post – that it can’t be based purely on intangible results. With that said – there is no proven method of effectively marketing with social media – it’s too new in the game to spell out what does and doesn’t work. More importantly than anything, you have to have the right PEOPLE in place – a person who believe in the medium, can tell you social media will generate X amount of dollars, and who will get out there and make it happen.

  • Ted Reply

    Selling social media to management has to become a business case. It can’t be argued in terms of “branding,” “connecting,” or “listening” (not to management). It needs to be argued like this: “If you let me allocate 10 hours a week to social media for the next 6 months, I can bring on 15 new clients and decrease client turnover by 23%, thus increasing revenue by $80,000.” Make a business case and back it up – that sells.

    • Matt Reply

      I 100% agree – that was the theme behind this post – that it can’t be based purely on intangible results. With that said – there is no proven method of effectively marketing with social media – it’s too new in the game to spell out what does and doesn’t work. More importantly than anything, you have to have the right PEOPLE in place – a person who believe in the medium, can tell you social media will generate X amount of dollars, and who will get out there and make it happen.

  • Eric Ungs Reply

    Great Post! I am in complete agreeance with your thoughts. When using a traditional advertising medium you are talking at the customer, with no interaction — with social media you are speaking with the customer. Engaging in a conversation — it could have nothing to do with your company or product. But, it shows you have genuine sincerity for your consumers. Companies need this type of engagement to build brand awareness, which in turn, lead to sales in the future. Not to mention, you have such a clear access in pinpointing your target audience that has never really be seen before.

    Thanks.

    • Matt Reply

      I agree with the ‘to’ vs ‘with analogy – social media provides what other media does not – interactivity. There is a real time investment when it comes to implementing social media marketing strategy – but I’m a believer, as most people who have commented here seem to be as well, that the time investment will pay dividends in the long run.

  • Eric Ungs Reply

    Great Post! I am in complete agreeance with your thoughts. When using a traditional advertising medium you are talking at the customer, with no interaction — with social media you are speaking with the customer. Engaging in a conversation — it could have nothing to do with your company or product. But, it shows you have genuine sincerity for your consumers. Companies need this type of engagement to build brand awareness, which in turn, lead to sales in the future. Not to mention, you have such a clear access in pinpointing your target audience that has never really be seen before.

    Thanks.

    • Matt Reply

      I agree with the ‘to’ vs ‘with analogy – social media provides what other media does not – interactivity. There is a real time investment when it comes to implementing social media marketing strategy – but I’m a believer, as most people who have commented here seem to be as well, that the time investment will pay dividends in the long run.

  • burnsy06 Reply

    The best thing about SM is that it raises the level of accessibility. Regardless of what happens after an exchange, feeling that Company X is “hearing” my feedback is going to increase the likelihood of me using their services again. That kind of good will cannot be bought with one-dimensional radio or TV ads.

    • Matt Reply

      Bingo. Social media provides a level of transparency that so many companies are striving to provide and so many customers are hungry for. Having names behind the corporate brand, people you actually connect with, is hugely beneficial to both parties.

  • burnsy06 Reply

    The best thing about SM is that it raises the level of accessibility. Regardless of what happens after an exchange, feeling that Company X is “hearing” my feedback is going to increase the likelihood of me using their services again. That kind of good will cannot be bought with one-dimensional radio or TV ads.

    • Matt Reply

      Bingo. Social media provides a level of transparency that so many companies are striving to provide and so many customers are hungry for. Having names behind the corporate brand, people you actually connect with, is hugely beneficial to both parties.

  • Ryan Reply

    I agree with Ted’s comment, business owners want numbers. You need to justify carrying an employee dedicated to “talking up” the company.
    Another example, I recently put together a proposal for a gentleman running for city mayor, and I told him I could get him 2400 votes from the 30 & Under demographic via social media. Once I gave him something chew on, he ran with and loved it.

    How do you feel about a company model built around catering to the needs of businesses social media demands? Designed to be a part time “marketing” partner that learns the in’s and out’s of their assigned business?

    • Matt Reply

      Hmm, that’s an interesting thought Ryan – I do very much believe any business who is serious about social media would benefit from having someone in-house, even if not on a full-time basis. Having a staff member who is deeply involved with the day-to-day company procedures will be more knowledgeable and typically more genuine – but with that said MANY companies are outsourcing their social media and even web marketing strategies.

      I’m curious – how did you support your guarantee of 2,400 votes – how did you explain your implementation strategy? I agree it must be presented in tangible numbers, but does it also involve a bit of faith from the client your working with?

  • Ryan Reply

    I agree with Ted’s comment, business owners want numbers. You need to justify carrying an employee dedicated to “talking up” the company.
    Another example, I recently put together a proposal for a gentleman running for city mayor, and I told him I could get him 2400 votes from the 30 & Under demographic via social media. Once I gave him something chew on, he ran with and loved it.

    How do you feel about a company model built around catering to the needs of businesses social media demands? Designed to be a part time “marketing” partner that learns the in’s and out’s of their assigned business?

    • Matt Reply

      Hmm, that’s an interesting thought Ryan – I do very much believe any business who is serious about social media would benefit from having someone in-house, even if not on a full-time basis. Having a staff member who is deeply involved with the day-to-day company procedures will be more knowledgeable and typically more genuine – but with that said MANY companies are outsourcing their social media and even web marketing strategies.

      I’m curious – how did you support your guarantee of 2,400 votes – how did you explain your implementation strategy? I agree it must be presented in tangible numbers, but does it also involve a bit of faith from the client your working with?

  • Jackie Reply

    I’m fascinated with social media simply because it’s so new that everyone is still figuring out the best way to utilize it as a marketing tool. Without a doubt, there is no one answer and for every brand and product, different tools will be better fits. As some of the commentors have already mentioned, I think that when selling social media to a company, you have to frame it as an investment in their customers. It will allow them to (potentially) interact with their customers instead of just speaking at them through traditional ads. If they can do this successfully, you can create very passionate customers.

    • Matt Reply

      Traditional advertising formats are a crap shoot – yes, you might hit some of your target demographic, but a majority of your impressions are in front of people who could care less. With social media, you’re able to pinpoint your target audience, plant seeds, and watch them blossom into raving fans of your product or service.

      • Jackie Adkins Reply

        And you’re able to be much more responsive to these people that you’ve pinpointed since all you have to do is send them a message, @reply, or email. Whereas with traditional advertising, a response would almost have to come in the form of another tv spot, press release, radio ad, or print ad, which is going to set you back quite a bit of money.

  • Jackie Reply

    I’m fascinated with social media simply because it’s so new that everyone is still figuring out the best way to utilize it as a marketing tool. Without a doubt, there is no one answer and for every brand and product, different tools will be better fits. As some of the commentors have already mentioned, I think that when selling social media to a company, you have to frame it as an investment in their customers. It will allow them to (potentially) interact with their customers instead of just speaking at them through traditional ads. If they can do this successfully, you can create very passionate customers.

    • Matt Reply

      Traditional advertising formats are a crap shoot – yes, you might hit some of your target demographic, but a majority of your impressions are in front of people who could care less. With social media, you’re able to pinpoint your target audience, plant seeds, and watch them blossom into raving fans of your product or service.

      • Jackie Adkins Reply

        And you’re able to be much more responsive to these people that you’ve pinpointed since all you have to do is send them a message, @reply, or email. Whereas with traditional advertising, a response would almost have to come in the form of another tv spot, press release, radio ad, or print ad, which is going to set you back quite a bit of money.

  • rikin Reply

    I don’t think any company should invest in social media… UNLESS they have objectives that can be met using these digital tools. Like you said, social media for companies is simply a tool and too often people put the cart before the horse.

    Customer acquisition and customer service are probably the two most important strategies seen sweeping Twitter and Facebook. Everyone’s trying to gain more followers and nurture the ones they already have. Tactics are more fun and dirty. I’ve seen many small business use these tools to advertise specials and coupons – contests and targeted discounts are a great way to go from virtual to tangible. Take a look at @cafemetro on twitter, to see a great example of a medium size business leveraging these tools.

    Media companies work completely differently but even here we can see tangible results if we have clear objectives. For example, if we revamp our newsletters and need to increase subscriptions we can blast the message out to our followers, bring them back to a landing page, and track the conversion rate. Omniture and other web analytics tools can also tell us if a visitor from Twitter spends more time on site, views more pages, prefers certain content over others, or is more likely to subscribe/purchase our product offering.

    PR is loving social media because it’s like a new play pen of toys for them to tout. I think soon HR will be grasping social media as well and realizing that if you want someone passionate about twitter and facebook that you might as well be using twitter and facebook to find them.

    Companies are looking for ROI and we need the metrics to back up our bravado. They’re out there but we’re all just getting used to them. Fifteen years ago we were all still getting familiar with the terms pageview, impression, and unique visitor. (I was 9 years old back then and fighting zombies in Doom). But metrics really serve no purpose unless they can translate into completing a specific objective.

  • rikin Reply

    I don’t think any company should invest in social media… UNLESS they have objectives that can be met using these digital tools. Like you said, social media for companies is simply a tool and too often people put the cart before the horse.

    Customer acquisition and customer service are probably the two most important strategies seen sweeping Twitter and Facebook. Everyone’s trying to gain more followers and nurture the ones they already have. Tactics are more fun and dirty. I’ve seen many small business use these tools to advertise specials and coupons – contests and targeted discounts are a great way to go from virtual to tangible. Take a look at @cafemetro on twitter, to see a great example of a medium size business leveraging these tools.

    Media companies work completely differently but even here we can see tangible results if we have clear objectives. For example, if we revamp our newsletters and need to increase subscriptions we can blast the message out to our followers, bring them back to a landing page, and track the conversion rate. Omniture and other web analytics tools can also tell us if a visitor from Twitter spends more time on site, views more pages, prefers certain content over others, or is more likely to subscribe/purchase our product offering.

    PR is loving social media because it’s like a new play pen of toys for them to tout. I think soon HR will be grasping social media as well and realizing that if you want someone passionate about twitter and facebook that you might as well be using twitter and facebook to find them.

    Companies are looking for ROI and we need the metrics to back up our bravado. They’re out there but we’re all just getting used to them. Fifteen years ago we were all still getting familiar with the terms pageview, impression, and unique visitor. (I was 9 years old back then and fighting zombies in Doom). But metrics really serve no purpose unless they can translate into completing a specific objective.

  • Noah Weiner Reply

    Audience awareness, dialogue, good will, and accessibility are all cornerstones of the SM deliverable. And, I agree with Ted that the real decision makers will not sign a check based on these things.

    But while we know that tangible, measurable wins that come from SM can help demonstrate its effect on the bottom line, I’m often flummoxed at the rationale which leads to proposing these measurables at the onset.

    While understanding the impact SM can have to ROI, how does one begin to stick a number on the wall. 15 new clients off of 6 months of SM? 2400 votes? I’m not say these are made up, and I fully respect the ability to frame things this way, but with so much in flux regarding social media, from where are the baseline assumptions being drawn?

    I’m talking with a number of clients about these things, and wonder how much these numbers are about aiming low (always prudent), so as to facilitate “backing it up,” or are somewhat shots in the dark (again with full respect) based off of informed knowledge of a client’s current business model, etc..

    Fascinating subject.

    • Matt Reply

      Noah – I asked the same question above in regards to where these numbers are coming from – what proof is there to back up the claim that Twitter can get you 2400 votes, or whatever the case may be – I don’t question the tools and their value – I think all of us are believers in the social media medium (you wouldn’t be here if you weren’t) but how do you monetize that value? Do you just take a shot in the dark? Are there statistics to back up your claims? As you said, it’s a very interesting topic to analyze and interpret. Thanks for swinging by – see you are from Chicago, I’m sure we’ll bump into each other somewhere down the line.

  • Noah Weiner Reply

    Audience awareness, dialogue, good will, and accessibility are all cornerstones of the SM deliverable. And, I agree with Ted that the real decision makers will not sign a check based on these things.

    But while we know that tangible, measurable wins that come from SM can help demonstrate its effect on the bottom line, I’m often flummoxed at the rationale which leads to proposing these measurables at the onset.

    While understanding the impact SM can have to ROI, how does one begin to stick a number on the wall. 15 new clients off of 6 months of SM? 2400 votes? I’m not say these are made up, and I fully respect the ability to frame things this way, but with so much in flux regarding social media, from where are the baseline assumptions being drawn?

    I’m talking with a number of clients about these things, and wonder how much these numbers are about aiming low (always prudent), so as to facilitate “backing it up,” or are somewhat shots in the dark (again with full respect) based off of informed knowledge of a client’s current business model, etc..

    Fascinating subject.

    • Matt Reply

      Noah – I asked the same question above in regards to where these numbers are coming from – what proof is there to back up the claim that Twitter can get you 2400 votes, or whatever the case may be – I don’t question the tools and their value – I think all of us are believers in the social media medium (you wouldn’t be here if you weren’t) but how do you monetize that value? Do you just take a shot in the dark? Are there statistics to back up your claims? As you said, it’s a very interesting topic to analyze and interpret. Thanks for swinging by – see you are from Chicago, I’m sure we’ll bump into each other somewhere down the line.

  • Brian Johnson Reply

    It’s easy to get caught up in the idea of using social media as a marketing tool. And there are fairly obvious applications for it, some of which are in the other comments here – crisis management, quickly and directly reaching influencers, potential for viral campaigns, etc. But what most people miss is that there even greater value in thinking about social media as the greatest dataset to come along since the evolution of CRM capabilities.

    The biggest value to be had from social media is to use it to INFORM strategic marketing decisions – not just to deploy marketing tactics that use the medium. If you think of all the authentic conversations that people have everyday about millions of topics and can filter and analyze that data in a meaningful way, the result is near immediate access to all of the information you’d ever need to sell a product: what to say, who you should be saying it to, where to say it, how to say it to them, etc. The real value of social media is about getting a level above marketing tactics and using it to inform marketing strategy.

    • Matt Reply

      Great point Brian – Social media is a powerful research and data collection tool – as you said, if I’m selling running shoes, I can tap into a multitude of ongoing twitter conversations related to a person’s “favorite running shoe” by processing a quick search. Social media has allowed for so much information to be accessed with a few clicks of the mouse. With that said, social media is a tool, a supplement to other PR and marketing mediums. Maybe you find that there are a ton of people in Chicago talking about running shoes so you ramp up your ad campaign in the area. SM is another piece to the marketing puzzle and when explained as such, can be presented as a real value to any company.

  • Brian Johnson Reply

    It’s easy to get caught up in the idea of using social media as a marketing tool. And there are fairly obvious applications for it, some of which are in the other comments here – crisis management, quickly and directly reaching influencers, potential for viral campaigns, etc. But what most people miss is that there even greater value in thinking about social media as the greatest dataset to come along since the evolution of CRM capabilities.

    The biggest value to be had from social media is to use it to INFORM strategic marketing decisions – not just to deploy marketing tactics that use the medium. If you think of all the authentic conversations that people have everyday about millions of topics and can filter and analyze that data in a meaningful way, the result is near immediate access to all of the information you’d ever need to sell a product: what to say, who you should be saying it to, where to say it, how to say it to them, etc. The real value of social media is about getting a level above marketing tactics and using it to inform marketing strategy.

    • Matt Reply

      Great point Brian – Social media is a powerful research and data collection tool – as you said, if I’m selling running shoes, I can tap into a multitude of ongoing twitter conversations related to a person’s “favorite running shoe” by processing a quick search. Social media has allowed for so much information to be accessed with a few clicks of the mouse. With that said, social media is a tool, a supplement to other PR and marketing mediums. Maybe you find that there are a ton of people in Chicago talking about running shoes so you ramp up your ad campaign in the area. SM is another piece to the marketing puzzle and when explained as such, can be presented as a real value to any company.

  • Mark Lewis Reply

    I’m not sure I agree with social media for marketers. That’s like telling spammers they need to harness the power of e-mail. It’s important for businesses to have a presence on social media, yes, but that presence needs to be transparent and organic.

    I use the word organic because I feel both sides of the relationship, brand and consumer, need to buy-in. I think this results in an equilibrium whereby both consumer and brand are equally rewarded from the relationship. If the brand is transparent it will get buy-in from consumers.

    • Matt Reply

      There is a fine line between the organic genuine use of social media to enhance your brand image and being a sales representative. The key is to build relationships that lead to sales, not in pretending to care about people so they’ll care about you. Humanize your corporate brand and people will genuinely believe what you have to say.

  • Mark Lewis Reply

    I’m not sure I agree with social media for marketers. That’s like telling spammers they need to harness the power of e-mail. It’s important for businesses to have a presence on social media, yes, but that presence needs to be transparent and organic.

    I use the word organic because I feel both sides of the relationship, brand and consumer, need to buy-in. I think this results in an equilibrium whereby both consumer and brand are equally rewarded from the relationship. If the brand is transparent it will get buy-in from consumers.

    • Matt Reply

      There is a fine line between the organic genuine use of social media to enhance your brand image and being a sales representative. The key is to build relationships that lead to sales, not in pretending to care about people so they’ll care about you. Humanize your corporate brand and people will genuinely believe what you have to say.

  • Elisa Reply

    I think one of the most dangerous things that is happening for the ROI for social media/marketing is that companies are thinking it is the new silver bullet to client acquisition. You can’t spit without landing a lugie on someone talking about how everyone shops/interacts/lives online and companies want to be a part of it. With print media dying a slow (and all too painful) death, television turning to reality dimensions and radio going XM there are fewer opportunities to mass market yourself.

    The danger lies in companies using social media/marketing as a silver bullet and thus diluting the ROI that companies willing to do the work will put in. Spam is now the MOST sent email on servers. Twitter had to do a MASS purge of all the bots hawking stuff. Facebook fan pages are a joke for most businesses who set up a virtual storefront and then started harassing friends who became fans.

    Before we can TRULY start measuring the ROI of social media we first have to shift the paradigm of thought to using it for good instead of annoyance or time wasting.

  • Elisa Reply

    I think one of the most dangerous things that is happening for the ROI for social media/marketing is that companies are thinking it is the new silver bullet to client acquisition. You can’t spit without landing a lugie on someone talking about how everyone shops/interacts/lives online and companies want to be a part of it. With print media dying a slow (and all too painful) death, television turning to reality dimensions and radio going XM there are fewer opportunities to mass market yourself.

    The danger lies in companies using social media/marketing as a silver bullet and thus diluting the ROI that companies willing to do the work will put in. Spam is now the MOST sent email on servers. Twitter had to do a MASS purge of all the bots hawking stuff. Facebook fan pages are a joke for most businesses who set up a virtual storefront and then started harassing friends who became fans.

    Before we can TRULY start measuring the ROI of social media we first have to shift the paradigm of thought to using it for good instead of annoyance or time wasting.

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    It all comes down to this: “Step Off The Social Media Treadmill” – http://bit.ly/sIdGh
    Before selling social media, I’d ask myself and my company if we really do need to sell it in the first place. Once you answer that question, you can begin to see the how. Understand your tools, understand your audience, and sell the tools that work for them.
    With so much buzz going on around social media, it won’t be a surprise when many companies start reporting losses in the “social media department”.
    Sell it if you need. Do you need it?

    • Matt Reply

      I think your question was rhetorical but I’ll answer it anyways. Yes, you need it – all businesses can benefit from social media as part of their marketing plan in some way. The challenge is finding out what that is. If you’re an independent coffee shop, maybe you should use social media to promote local events – if your Best Buy – maybe it’s to promote sales or simply to add a more ‘personal’ touch to that big ugly corporate image. The approach varies from business to business (check out the latest episode of After the Boom for more on this: http://aftertheboompodcast.com/social-media-for-small-businesses/)

  • Carlos Miceli Reply

    It all comes down to this: “Step Off The Social Media Treadmill” – http://bit.ly/sIdGh
    Before selling social media, I’d ask myself and my company if we really do need to sell it in the first place. Once you answer that question, you can begin to see the how. Understand your tools, understand your audience, and sell the tools that work for them.
    With so much buzz going on around social media, it won’t be a surprise when many companies start reporting losses in the “social media department”.
    Sell it if you need. Do you need it?

    • Matt Reply

      I think your question was rhetorical but I’ll answer it anyways. Yes, you need it – all businesses can benefit from social media as part of their marketing plan in some way. The challenge is finding out what that is. If you’re an independent coffee shop, maybe you should use social media to promote local events – if your Best Buy – maybe it’s to promote sales or simply to add a more ‘personal’ touch to that big ugly corporate image. The approach varies from business to business (check out the latest episode of After the Boom for more on this: http://aftertheboompodcast.com/social-media-for-small-businesses/)

  • Anita Lobo Reply

    Hi Matt,

    I have to confess that I don’t ‘sell’ social media. Infact I actively dissuade clients from using it unless they fully understand:
    – the time, effort and costs involved
    – this is organic growth and not lets play around for 3 months & unplug
    – this will be a learning process, and corrections will take place as we go along
    – senior management buy-in is required on both sides to make it rock!
    – you can’t ‘control’ the conversation – we can guide it
    – you can’t keep selling stuff: you have to give first

    There is an element of risk and transparency we must prepare clients for and a larger element of joy too!

    Cheers,
    Anita Lobo

    • Matt Reply

      Agree – on all accounts – the TIME factor is one that has to be understood – as with any relationship building, on or offline – it takes a real time commitment to grow organically and establish lasting connections. And it’s something, as you said, that management has to buy into and believe in – it may take some convincing, but without belief in the medium, it will never be successful. Good thoughts as always Anita.

  • Anita Lobo Reply

    Hi Matt,

    I have to confess that I don’t ‘sell’ social media. Infact I actively dissuade clients from using it unless they fully understand:
    – the time, effort and costs involved
    – this is organic growth and not lets play around for 3 months & unplug
    – this will be a learning process, and corrections will take place as we go along
    – senior management buy-in is required on both sides to make it rock!
    – you can’t ‘control’ the conversation – we can guide it
    – you can’t keep selling stuff: you have to give first

    There is an element of risk and transparency we must prepare clients for and a larger element of joy too!

    Cheers,
    Anita Lobo

    • Matt Reply

      Agree – on all accounts – the TIME factor is one that has to be understood – as with any relationship building, on or offline – it takes a real time commitment to grow organically and establish lasting connections. And it’s something, as you said, that management has to buy into and believe in – it may take some convincing, but without belief in the medium, it will never be successful. Good thoughts as always Anita.

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