Recently, I was asked by a good friend of mine to write a post about time-management and organization. Let me preface by saying I am not, contrary to popular belief, some sort of super-human prioritizer and organizer. I am human. I do sleep. But I also constantly work on ways to efficiently manage my time and, in short, maximize the hours available to me in a given day. Here I’ve included FIVE things you can (easily) start doing today that will enhance your online productivity.

1) Wake Up Earlier

Wake Up Early

What’s the number one thing I do that most people don’t? I wake up early. Really early. You’ll typically find me awake and getting things done around sunrise, even on weekends. The hours of 5am-9am are the most productive for yours truly. While the world sleeps, I grab a cup of coffee and can work without interruptions. No one’s Tweeting, no emails are coming in, so minimizing distractions (more on this later) is much easier by default.

While waking up at 5am on a Saturday might seem absolutely insane – you can start setting your alarm a little earlier – try 30 minutes. Go nuts this weekend and wake up at 6am, work until about 8:30, and then start your day. See how much better you feel knowing that you were productive before your spouse and kids saw the light of day. When I set out to write this post – my initial thought was to tell you that “sleeping is for suckers” – I won’t go that far, but you don’t need me to tell you that there are only so many hours in a day, and life’s too short for someone as motivated as you to sleep it all away, right?

2) Know When to Walk Away

Never Forget the Power of a Great List

It’s my belief that this is the single-most important lesson to learn – whether we’re talking about writing a blog, working on a project, both online and offline, knowing when to walk away is imperative to not only success, but in maintaining your sanity. I’ve had conversations with many bloggers who tell me when they start a blog, they have to finish it, right then and there. From beginning to end, no matter how long it takes, they want to get everything written, edited, and ready to publish in one fell swoop.

I’m here to tell you that this is hardly ever realistic. When you work like this, you end up wasting far too much precious time. Writers block is usually a result of over-thinking things. You start a blog idea and you sit there, staring at the words, wondering what to say next. Time ticks by and you’ve accomplished nothing, but because you’re determined to get everything done in one sitting, you justify the time you’ve wasted.

Don’t let this happen to you anymore. Next time you’re faced with a situation like this,  save your draft, close out of your word processor, and move on to something else. You’re ideas will be there when you’re ready, and usually, the best content is written  in stages, when you’re able to tackle it with a fresh mind from multiple angles. If you’ve ever written a post late at night and hit publish, only to wake up the next morning and ask yourself, “What the heck was I thinking” - you know exactly why finishing it all in one sitting may not be the best strategy.

3) Use Google Reader

Use Google Reader

This seems like a no brainer, right? Wrong. You would be amazed at the number of people I’ve talked to who either 1) Don’t use Google Reader (or some other blog-reader) or 2) Have no clue what Google Reader is. Seriously guys – if you are a blogger and/or blog reader, Google Reader is a MUST for both organization and blogging strategy. There are many out there who read blogs soley based on the recommendations of other people (on Twitter, Facebook, etc). This will work for a while, and to each his own, but for me personally, I want to be able to get all of the blog content I know and love in one place. Like checking email, Twitter, Facebook, etc – logging into my Google Reader every morning to see what new posts are up has become a part of my “routine” (you’ll hear me use this word a lot from here on out).

If you were paying attention above, I mentioned that Google Reader is a valuable strategic tool. Why? Commenting on other blogs (relevant, thoughtful comments, folks) is a huge way to direct traffic back to your neck of the woods. Something for you to take with you and use moving forward: Be (one of) the first to comment on a big-name blog (Brogan, Mashable, etc) and see what kind of traffic it directs back to you. Being one of the first to comment means that EVERYONE else coming through will see your comment, or at least your name. More impressions means more chances of click-throughs. It’s not rocket-science. Keep an eye on your Google Reader and be one of the first to pounce when you see new article has been published.

4) Schedule Time for Blogging

Schedule Time for Blogging

Blogging is an investment. Let me repeat: BLOGGING IS AN INVESTMENT. There are many, many people out there who start a blog with the idea that it is going to be amazing. That everyone will want to read it because, honestly, who wouldn’t want to read what you have to say? You may be right, you may be an amazing writer, but if you have your head this high in the clouds, and you think that your blog will sell itself, you’ll never get very far and you’re only kidding yourself.

Think of your blog like a new car. A car needs tune-ups, maintenance, attention, and gas to keep it moving. If you’re coasting along, 10,000 miles past due for an oil change, the car isn’t going to run very well. You need to put your foot on the gas and keep it there, meanwhile giving it the regular maintenance it deserves. Sure, there are going to be times when you have to lay off the accelerator, and every once in a while you’ll get a flat tire – it’s only natural for things to cool off every once in a while, life has a funny way of getting in the way sometimes. BUT, don’t neglect it altogether and ruin the transmission.

The point of my analogy is that in order to keep a blog running, to see growth within your community, you MUST invest real time and effort into it. Schedule time out of your day/week to sit down and focus on nothing but your blog and providing it with “fuel” to keep it running. POST CONSISTENTLY and develop a schedule and routine your readers can rely on. There’s no right or wrong as to how often you should post, but it’s unanimous that consistency breeds success.

5) Eliminate All Distractions

Eliminate Distractions

Last but not least in this rundown of tactics you can (and should) start putting into action for yourself today – is doing everything you can to eliminate (or at least reduce) distractions.

Right now, as I type this, I have Google Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Excel, Word, TweetDeck, Skype, Outlook, & Gchat all open on my desktop! As a result, this post has taken way longer than it should to write. I’m going sentence by sentence, jumping around different browser windows, adding info into Excel, checking emails and IM’s as they come in – it’s chaos.

One thing I do for myself (another reason why I love early mornings) is to engage in ONE activity at a time – and keep everything else closed. Have you ever worked on a project somewhere that you couldn’t get Internet? How much did you get done? Probably a lot. It’s amazing what we can do when there’s nothing else to do. Simulate this by unplugging from all of the potential distractions and focusing on ONE thing at a time. We’re quick to say “I’m an efficient multi-tasker”, but I believe the greater strength is in the ability to focus undivided attention to completion of ONE project.

What time-management and organization techniques do you commit to? Share your ideas, thoughts, and suggestions in the comments below.

Join the conversation! 128 Comments

  1. Besides giving up sleep (which I basically did 6 months ago), I’ve found that having certain routines are critical for staying on top of things. Also, given that more of my time is spent away from my main computer, I’ve taken the proper steps to make sure everything is synced the best possible way, be it email (IMAP to both my phone and various computers), using XMarks in Firefox to keep by bookmarks synced, and Windows LiveSync to keep certain folders synced between my desktop and laptops.

    Also, finding a good (but safe) use of ‘dead’ time has been a good boost. I have a great hands-free setup in my truck, so I make calls while I’m driving without putting myself at risk.

    Reply
    • I think that’s something I would benefit from greatly Andrew (hands free) – not only is it safer, but I spend at least 2 1/2 hours in the car daily (believe me I know it stinks). There has to be a better way to use that time that blasting Lady Gaga and singing like a little school girl.

      Reply
      • Do both. Make your calls, and sing in between. Makes for a decent ride. But a good hands-free is worth it’s weight in gold. Mine is integrated into my stereo, so I can answer my phone directly from my dashboard. It automatically mutes the stereo, the caller comes through my speakers, and there is a small mic affixed to my steering column that picks up my part of the conversation.

        Reply
  2. Besides giving up sleep (which I basically did 6 months ago), I’ve found that having certain routines are critical for staying on top of things. Also, given that more of my time is spent away from my main computer, I’ve taken the proper steps to make sure everything is synced the best possible way, be it email (IMAP to both my phone and various computers), using XMarks in Firefox to keep by bookmarks synced, and Windows LiveSync to keep certain folders synced between my desktop and laptops.

    Also, finding a good (but safe) use of ‘dead’ time has been a good boost. I have a great hands-free setup in my truck, so I make calls while I’m driving without putting myself at risk.

    Reply
    • I think that’s something I would benefit from greatly Andrew (hands free) – not only is it safer, but I spend at least 2 1/2 hours in the car daily (believe me I know it stinks). There has to be a better way to use that time that blasting Lady Gaga and singing like a little school girl.

      Reply
      • Do both. Make your calls, and sing in between. Makes for a decent ride. But a good hands-free is worth it’s weight in gold. Mine is integrated into my stereo, so I can answer my phone directly from my dashboard. It automatically mutes the stereo, the caller comes through my speakers, and there is a small mic affixed to my steering column that picks up my part of the conversation.

        Reply
      • @Matt: Try listening to audiobooks or learning a language. I got through the entire Malcom Gladwell trilogy in a week while sitting in traffic. You could even go through a personal development course. It’s amazing how much you can do during that time.

        Reply
        • Yeah – I need to make an investment in Audible (or something similar) and take advantage of that time spent in the car…Do you use a particular service for audiobooks?

          Reply
  3. Matt,

    This is all great advice. If only I were a morning person. (I probably wouldn’t be up commenting on your blog post at almost 1:30 a.m. if that were the case.) I think many lost hours while online are spent on social networking sites. You can log onto Facebook or Twitter for a quick update and then wonder what you’re still doing there 45 minutes later. Every college kid knows it’s the ultimate procrastination tool.

    It can help to set aside certain times for checking Facebook or responding to tweets. Maybe there are specific times throughout the day that you devote to getting your Twitter fix. Or maybe if you’re working diligently on something for X amount of time, you allow yourself X minutes for a social networking break.

    Whatever your strategy, make sure that online socializing (or stalking) isn’t acting as a huge time suck in your day. Don’t let it prevent you from getting things done.

    Again, great tips.

    -Abby
    @abschoff

    Reply
    • I like this idea and know several people or do this. I wish I could remember who I saw doing this, but one person I follow on Twitter actually objectively states in his bio that he limits his “tweeting” to the hours of “XX – XX” each day. Maybe that’s taking it to an extreme, but setting aside some guidelines for yourself will limit you from becoming one of those “wanderers” as mentioned. These social media tools, at their core, were initially to make communication and networking MORE efficient, we’re the ones who have transformed them into the huge time-wasters they CAN be.

      Reply
  4. Matt,

    This is all great advice. If only I were a morning person. (I probably wouldn’t be up commenting on your blog post at almost 1:30 a.m. if that were the case.) I think many lost hours while online are spent on social networking sites. You can log onto Facebook or Twitter for a quick update and then wonder what you’re still doing there 45 minutes later. Every college kid knows it’s the ultimate procrastination tool.

    It can help to set aside certain times for checking Facebook or responding to tweets. Maybe there are specific times throughout the day that you devote to getting your Twitter fix. Or maybe if you’re working diligently on something for X amount of time, you allow yourself X minutes for a social networking break.

    Whatever your strategy, make sure that online socializing (or stalking) isn’t acting as a huge time suck in your day. Don’t let it prevent you from getting things done.

    Again, great tips.

    -Abby
    @abschoff

    Reply
    • I like this idea and know several people or do this. I wish I could remember who I saw doing this, but one person I follow on Twitter actually objectively states in his bio that he limits his “tweeting” to the hours of “XX – XX” each day. Maybe that’s taking it to an extreme, but setting aside some guidelines for yourself will limit you from becoming one of those “wanderers” as mentioned. These social media tools, at their core, were initially to make communication and networking MORE efficient, we’re the ones who have transformed them into the huge time-wasters they CAN be.

      Reply
  5. I like your style, this is no BS productivity. This niche has become so crowded that everybody start sharing tips out of nowhere, but that’s certainly not your case.

    I really liked the idea of “unmultitasking”: do only one thing at a time, and that a blog is an investment. I really know the last one, I invested a lot in my blog in the last year and it’s really starting to pay off. In fact, I have to schedule time for distractions and have fun, this is how much time I spend on blogging now.

    Reply
    • I know the feeling Dragos – I end up over-working myself far too often and have to actually force myself to say in bed longer, get outside, etc. Just as there are distractions limiting you from being an effective blogger, blogging can distract you from getting out there and living your life. As I said in a recent post, make your blog a PART of your life, but don’t let it BECOME your life. Cheers!

      Reply
  6. I like your style, this is no BS productivity. This niche has become so crowded that everybody start sharing tips out of nowhere, but that’s certainly not your case.

    I really liked the idea of “unmultitasking”: do only one thing at a time, and that a blog is an investment. I really know the last one, I invested a lot in my blog in the last year and it’s really starting to pay off. In fact, I have to schedule time for distractions and have fun, this is how much time I spend on blogging now.

    Reply
    • I know the feeling Dragos – I end up over-working myself far too often and have to actually force myself to say in bed longer, get outside, etc. Just as there are distractions limiting you from being an effective blogger, blogging can distract you from getting out there and living your life. As I said in a recent post, make your blog a PART of your life, but don’t let it BECOME your life. Cheers!

      Reply
  7. Great tips Matt!

    While it’s true getting up early is a sure-fire way to get things done without must distraction, it can lead to burning out if fyou don’t get ENOUGH sleep.

    Aside from that, I agree that forcing yourself to work on ONE project at a time is both challenging and fruitful. My biggest setback by far is twitter. With tweet deck open my attention is automatically diverted and it takes significantly longer to accomplish things. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve learned so much and pulled inspiration from articles that people tweet and post but it’s inherently distracting. I then find myself with 10 windows open, each with a different article, email or post and I don’t even get threw one before I’m clicking through the rest. I think it boils down to DISCIPLINE. We don’t have our parents to tell us to buckle down and get things accomplished so it’s up to us to say, no the world will NOT end if I close tweetdeck for a couple of hours. But boy does it feel that way :)

    Reply
  8. Great tips Matt!

    While it’s true getting up early is a sure-fire way to get things done without must distraction, it can lead to burning out if fyou don’t get ENOUGH sleep.

    Aside from that, I agree that forcing yourself to work on ONE project at a time is both challenging and fruitful. My biggest setback by far is twitter. With tweet deck open my attention is automatically diverted and it takes significantly longer to accomplish things. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve learned so much and pulled inspiration from articles that people tweet and post but it’s inherently distracting. I then find myself with 10 windows open, each with a different article, email or post and I don’t even get threw one before I’m clicking through the rest. I think it boils down to DISCIPLINE. We don’t have our parents to tell us to buckle down and get things accomplished so it’s up to us to say, no the world will NOT end if I close tweetdeck for a couple of hours. But boy does it feel that way :)

    Reply
    • Tweetdeck will be the death of me! I think we can all attest to the addictive nature of Twitter – it can be an uber-productive tool, or the biggest time-waster known to man, depending on your approach and mindset. As you said, it all boils down to discipline. There are actually tools that exist online that force you to block out distractions by limiting applications you can open for a time you pre-determine. Check out “Self Control” – pretty cool little app if you are a mac user (I’m not, so I’ll have to rely on my own self discipline. :)

      http://www.downloadsquad.com/2009/04/02/block-out-online-distractions-by-force-with-selfcontrol/

      Reply
    • I have the same problem, Lindsey. There are way too many distractions on the Internet when I’m trying to get something done. I also am the time of person who likes to be working on about 2-3 projects at the same time, but I’ve learned even if you’re not focusing on one thing, you need to dedicate time to only be doing one thing for at least a 2-3 hour stretch at a time. Otherwise, I’ll half-ass all my projects. :P

      Reply
      • Multi-tasking is overrated – that’s for sure. I used to be this way (trying to tackle a million things at once) but have really developed the focused “take one thing at a time” attitude. It’s really improved my overall productivity. It’s good practice to see a project through from start to finish (when possible) – cutting out the noise and limiting other online distractions is critical to making this happen. Thanks for the comment!

        Reply
  9. The best thing about this post – and the one I’ve started to apply as well – is the waking up early. I started to wake up at 6 am, and enjoyed the horrified looks of my colleagues at work when I’d tell them how much I had already done by 9 am.
    I once witnessed a nice dialogue between a senior manager and a middle manager in my company, at breakfast.
    MM: “I got up so late today. Normally I’m very efficient in the morning. I get to work really early.”
    SM: “Yeah I know what you mean. I get up at 5 and I’m at work by 7 the latest.”
    MM: “No, I usually make it even by 6:00.”
    That sounded a bit like boasting “Look how much of an early riser I am!” but hey, whatever works.

    I very much agree with Lindsey that ultimately it all boils down to DISCIPLINE – the waking up early part, the knowing where to stop part, and of course the stopping multitasking part.

    Reply
    • I have REALLY been working on that “un-multi-tasking” point lately. I used to think the most efficient way to get things done was to tackle it all at once – but really, there is no benefit in spreading your attention so thin. There’s a balance, but often times the most productive approach is to tackle something from beginning to end – but always remember that it’s OK to walk away. Thanks for the comment Maria!

      Reply
  10. The best thing about this post – and the one I’ve started to apply as well – is the waking up early. I started to wake up at 6 am, and enjoyed the horrified looks of my colleagues at work when I’d tell them how much I had already done by 9 am.
    I once witnessed a nice dialogue between a senior manager and a middle manager in my company, at breakfast.
    MM: “I got up so late today. Normally I’m very efficient in the morning. I get to work really early.”
    SM: “Yeah I know what you mean. I get up at 5 and I’m at work by 7 the latest.”
    MM: “No, I usually make it even by 6:00.”
    That sounded a bit like boasting “Look how much of an early riser I am!” but hey, whatever works.

    I very much agree with Lindsey that ultimately it all boils down to DISCIPLINE – the waking up early part, the knowing where to stop part, and of course the stopping multitasking part.

    Reply
    • I have REALLY been working on that “un-multi-tasking” point lately. I used to think the most efficient way to get things done was to tackle it all at once – but really, there is no benefit in spreading your attention so thin. There’s a balance, but often times the most productive approach is to tackle something from beginning to end – but always remember that it’s OK to walk away. Thanks for the comment Maria!

      Reply
  11. Tried to be the first comment. I really did. Great Post!

    Reply
  12. Tried to be the first comment. I really did. Great Post!

    Reply
  13. Great ideas here, but I am curious as to why you don’t mention staying up late to get some work done vs. *just* getting up early? More distractions from people who are also up perhaps?

    Reply
    • If you’re more of a night owl then more power to you – but yes, I think the wee hours of the morning are much more conducive to uninterrupted productivity. Plus there is generally more to do in the evening, the world pretty much stands still at 5am on Saturday :)

      Reply
      • Except for those who never went to sleep…. Actually, I have many Twitter friends on the East Coast who I will chat with in the morning… and West coasters at night. Maybe, I can wake up for a few hours between 2-4! :)

        Thanks for the post! It was great reading the comments as well. Inspiring.

        Reply
  14. Great ideas here, but I am curious as to why you don’t mention staying up late to get some work done vs. *just* getting up early? More distractions from people who are also up perhaps?

    Reply
    • If you’re more of a night owl then more power to you – but yes, I think the wee hours of the morning are much more conducive to uninterrupted productivity. Plus there is generally more to do in the evening, the world pretty much stands still at 5am on Saturday :)

      Reply
      • Except for those who never went to sleep…. Actually, I have many Twitter friends on the East Coast who I will chat with in the morning… and West coasters at night. Maybe, I can wake up for a few hours between 2-4! :)

        Thanks for the post! It was great reading the comments as well. Inspiring.

        Reply
  15. Some great advice here.

    One thing I want to bring up is the issue of sleep. I’ve always been a big proponent of waking up early to get work done (for the same reason, too…I HATE being constantly interrupted while working, and getting stuff done in the morning makes it feel like freebie time before everyone else has gotten started)…but at the same time I’ve been trying to get MORE sleep recently because it’s been shown that you can actually be a whole lot more effective all day long if you make sure to get your ideal amount of sleep.

    This took me quite a while to even acknowledge as valid information because, similar to you, I want to have as many productive hours in my day as possible. In college I slept 3-4 hours per night, and when I started up my studio I was going for maybe 5 most nights, tops.

    Now I aim for 7 hours because I’ve found (through a whole lot of trial and error) that when I get that many hours of sleep I operate at peak efficiency. Everyone will be different, I’m sure, but before I started really trying to figure this out I would always claim that I didn’t need much sleep, 5 hours was enough, etc etc etc. There is a distinct difference in how well I work after having or not having those 2 more hours of sleep, however, and the increased productivity has been great for me.

    Something to consider! Like I said, really great post and I’m looking forward to more!

    Reply
    • Colin – thanks for adding to the discssion here. You bring up an important point – and I agree that getting enough sleep is critical not only to productivity, but in maintaining good health. Notice above that I say “Wake Up Earlier” – I don’t say “sleep less”. I’m typically an early-to-bed, early-to-rise kind of guy. I still get in 6-7 hours of sleep (at least) regularly and I think that’s an important takeaway for anyone reading this – whether you wake up early or stay up late, make sure you’re still getting enough sleep that you’re not walking around like a zombie all day.

      Reply
  16. Some great advice here.

    One thing I want to bring up is the issue of sleep. I’ve always been a big proponent of waking up early to get work done (for the same reason, too…I HATE being constantly interrupted while working, and getting stuff done in the morning makes it feel like freebie time before everyone else has gotten started)…but at the same time I’ve been trying to get MORE sleep recently because it’s been shown that you can actually be a whole lot more effective all day long if you make sure to get your ideal amount of sleep.

    This took me quite a while to even acknowledge as valid information because, similar to you, I want to have as many productive hours in my day as possible. In college I slept 3-4 hours per night, and when I started up my studio I was going for maybe 5 most nights, tops.

    Now I aim for 7 hours because I’ve found (through a whole lot of trial and error) that when I get that many hours of sleep I operate at peak efficiency. Everyone will be different, I’m sure, but before I started really trying to figure this out I would always claim that I didn’t need much sleep, 5 hours was enough, etc etc etc. There is a distinct difference in how well I work after having or not having those 2 more hours of sleep, however, and the increased productivity has been great for me.

    Something to consider! Like I said, really great post and I’m looking forward to more!

    Reply
    • Colin – thanks for adding to the discssion here. You bring up an important point – and I agree that getting enough sleep is critical not only to productivity, but in maintaining good health. Notice above that I say “Wake Up Earlier” – I don’t say “sleep less”. I’m typically an early-to-bed, early-to-rise kind of guy. I still get in 6-7 hours of sleep (at least) regularly and I think that’s an important takeaway for anyone reading this – whether you wake up early or stay up late, make sure you’re still getting enough sleep that you’re not walking around like a zombie all day.

      Reply
  17. Oh man, couldn’t agree more about Google Reader. I’m always trying to explain to my non-blogging friends how great it is.. and when I explain what it does, they’re like “Wow.. that is cool..” but they never take the initiative to set it up and enhance their browsing by some crazy percentage. Great post. Idk about 5 a.m. on the weekends. I’m cool with not being able to turn off my internal 7 a.m. alarm clock for now :)

    Reply
    • Isn’t it a little loco that there are so many people NOT using Google Reader – I am really surprised that’s not a staple by now within the blogging community. As for the 5am wake up call – it’s not an every-day thing – the point is, start waking up a little earlier and you’ll be amazed at what you can get done in a day.

      Reply
  18. Oh man, couldn’t agree more about Google Reader. I’m always trying to explain to my non-blogging friends how great it is.. and when I explain what it does, they’re like “Wow.. that is cool..” but they never take the initiative to set it up and enhance their browsing by some crazy percentage. Great post. Idk about 5 a.m. on the weekends. I’m cool with not being able to turn off my internal 7 a.m. alarm clock for now :)

    Reply
    • Isn’t it a little loco that there are so many people NOT using Google Reader – I am really surprised that’s not a staple by now within the blogging community. As for the 5am wake up call – it’s not an every-day thing – the point is, start waking up a little earlier and you’ll be amazed at what you can get done in a day.

      Reply
  19. Good no nonense advice Matt.

    The only change I would have would be waking up early doesn’t work for everyone. I absolutely suck at getting up before 8am. It simply doesn’t happen.

    What I’ve done is augment my schedule so that I can get a brunt of my work done at night, when I’m most productive. I write my emails then, do most of my writing, proposal drafting, etc. Around 10pm I can focus extremely well as most of the world seems to wind down for the night.

    I’ve tried numerous times to switch my schedule (and still will try) but just can’t seem to swing it.

    Reply
    • Thanks Ryan. That point is really a “to each his own” – I prefer the early morning routine. When I’m super-productive in the morning, I’m somehow able to relax more throughout the day, knowing that I’ve already taken a huge chunk out of my to-do list. It puts me in a good place before the day REALLY begins.

      Reply
  20. Good no nonense advice Matt.

    The only change I would have would be waking up early doesn’t work for everyone. I absolutely suck at getting up before 8am. It simply doesn’t happen.

    What I’ve done is augment my schedule so that I can get a brunt of my work done at night, when I’m most productive. I write my emails then, do most of my writing, proposal drafting, etc. Around 10pm I can focus extremely well as most of the world seems to wind down for the night.

    I’ve tried numerous times to switch my schedule (and still will try) but just can’t seem to swing it.

    Reply
    • Thanks Ryan. That point is really a “to each his own” – I prefer the early morning routine. When I’m super-productive in the morning, I’m somehow able to relax more throughout the day, knowing that I’ve already taken a huge chunk out of my to-do list. It puts me in a good place before the day REALLY begins.

      Reply
  21. Matt,
    Sometimes I think you read my mind. I had a wave of motivation hit me on Sunday and one of my first goals was to wake up earlier. My earliest class isn’t until 12pm, so you can imagine the temptation to sleep until about 9! As much as I would like to think that I get my best work done at night, it’s definitely not the case. I do the best work before 5pm.

    I also agree with you on Google Reader. Compared to anything else online I am probably the proudest of my Google Reader. It’s where I am the most organized and engaged. I get so much inspiration and knowledge from such a diverse range of blogs. Let me tell you, my tweets would be dull if it weren’t for Google Reader.

    Great post, I am passing it on to some friends!

    Reply
    • Agreed – Google Reader has become one of my “central hubs” – I’d be lost without the organization and structure I have set up there. Keeps my mind engaged, gets ideas flowing, conversation brewing, etc. Most of what I do here is inspired by what I read out there.

      I’ve never been good at getting QUALITY work done at night, my mind is too dull from the day to have the focus I want and need – I’d rather sleep on it and wake up even earlier the next morning.

      Thanks for the comment and thanks for sharing! Hope you and your friends got some value out of this and takeaways you can start putting into action!

      Reply
  22. Matt,
    Sometimes I think you read my mind. I had a wave of motivation hit me on Sunday and one of my first goals was to wake up earlier. My earliest class isn’t until 12pm, so you can imagine the temptation to sleep until about 9! As much as I would like to think that I get my best work done at night, it’s definitely not the case. I do the best work before 5pm.

    I also agree with you on Google Reader. Compared to anything else online I am probably the proudest of my Google Reader. It’s where I am the most organized and engaged. I get so much inspiration and knowledge from such a diverse range of blogs. Let me tell you, my tweets would be dull if it weren’t for Google Reader.

    Great post, I am passing it on to some friends!

    Reply
    • Agreed – Google Reader has become one of my “central hubs” – I’d be lost without the organization and structure I have set up there. Keeps my mind engaged, gets ideas flowing, conversation brewing, etc. Most of what I do here is inspired by what I read out there.

      I’ve never been good at getting QUALITY work done at night, my mind is too dull from the day to have the focus I want and need – I’d rather sleep on it and wake up even earlier the next morning.

      Thanks for the comment and thanks for sharing! Hope you and your friends got some value out of this and takeaways you can start putting into action!

      Reply
  23. Looks like everyone’s mentioning SLEEP in the comments! Waking up early is of course a smart idea. It’s incredible how much truly gets done in the morning…actual morning 7-11, or something in that vicinity. As a team, we’ve started to meet every Monday to discuss activities of the week and get everything straightened out. Works great and saves time, because everyone knows exactly what they need to be doing. Remember the milk also works really well for me and the team. Basically, it’s an online to do list, several notches up from post-it notes!

    Reply
  24. Looks like everyone’s mentioning SLEEP in the comments! Waking up early is of course a smart idea. It’s incredible how much truly gets done in the morning…actual morning 7-11, or something in that vicinity. As a team, we’ve started to meet every Monday to discuss activities of the week and get everything straightened out. Works great and saves time, because everyone knows exactly what they need to be doing. Remember the milk also works really well for me and the team. Basically, it’s an online to do list, several notches up from post-it notes!

    Reply
  25. Great advice. I’ve recently started awaking up at the butt crack of dawn to get things done. Here is one suggestion on that though; get to sleep earlier to compensate. Seems like a no-brainer it took me a while to figure that part out. I also eat White-Out so that could explain things.

    Keep up the much better than average work!

    Reply
  26. Great advice. I’ve recently started awaking up at the butt crack of dawn to get things done. Here is one suggestion on that though; get to sleep earlier to compensate. Seems like a no-brainer it took me a while to figure that part out. I also eat White-Out so that could explain things.

    Keep up the much better than average work!

    Reply
  27. Nice tips Matt, thanks for posting. I tend to stay up later to get things done, but the plan backfires regularly when the kids wake up the next day at their usual way-too-early times. I’m going to switch to waking up early to change things up.
    I thought I had distractions when I work, but wow, you have a lot going. I don’t feel so bad having my regular slew of apps open after see yours. :)

    Reply
    • Haha, I try to keep things as minimal as possible with only a couple of open apps at a time – I actually went back and read this while I was editing and asked myself , “Why the heck did I have SO many things open at the same time?” Did I mention the steps listed above (at least some) are still very much at work-in-progress?

      Reply
  28. Nice tips Matt, thanks for posting. I tend to stay up later to get things done, but the plan backfires regularly when the kids wake up the next day at their usual way-too-early times. I’m going to switch to waking up early to change things up.
    I thought I had distractions when I work, but wow, you have a lot going. I don’t feel so bad having my regular slew of apps open after see yours. :)

    Reply
    • Haha, I try to keep things as minimal as possible with only a couple of open apps at a time – I actually went back and read this while I was editing and asked myself , “Why the heck did I have SO many things open at the same time?” Did I mention the steps listed above (at least some) are still very much at work-in-progress?

      Reply
  29. Waking up at 5am?!?! I’m not a morning person. I usually wake up at 7am, but if I want to accomplish my online productivity, I need to follow your rules. I should also consider Google Reader. Never thought of it. Thanks for the advise. Now it’s time for me to apply them. Well written post, as always.

    Reply
    • Thanks Chelia – I STRONGLY advise you to start using Google Reader to organize your blog reading. I promise it will make that process SO much easier. Let me know if you need any help!

      Reply
  30. Waking up at 5am?!?! I’m not a morning person. I usually wake up at 7am, but if I want to accomplish my online productivity, I need to follow your rules. I should also consider Google Reader. Never thought of it. Thanks for the advise. Now it’s time for me to apply them. Well written post, as always.

    Reply
    • Thanks Chelia – I STRONGLY advise you to start using Google Reader to organize your blog reading. I promise it will make that process SO much easier. Let me know if you need any help!

      Reply
  31. I’m always the first in the office for my department, this gives me a head start on the day and time to sort various projects/e-mails. I also use this time to write blog posts/upload photographs.
    Instead of waking up at 5:00AM I wake up at 6:00 AM since I’m awake into the night working on projects, but your post have given me inspiration to reverse that habit. I need to catch up on sleep- I miss sleep.

    A top to share: When I need to focus on one writing project, I plug in my headphones and listen to music. It’s a huge help when I’m having trouble focusing.

    Reply
    • Listening to music while working can do wonder for productivity. Sometimes when I “lose” myself in a good album, I almost always walk away with a new idea or a fresh perspective. Thanks for the comment Van!

      Reply
  32. I’m always the first in the office for my department, this gives me a head start on the day and time to sort various projects/e-mails. I also use this time to write blog posts/upload photographs.
    Instead of waking up at 5:00AM I wake up at 6:00 AM since I’m awake into the night working on projects, but your post have given me inspiration to reverse that habit. I need to catch up on sleep- I miss sleep.

    A top to share: When I need to focus on one writing project, I plug in my headphones and listen to music. It’s a huge help when I’m having trouble focusing.

    Reply
    • Listening to music while working can do wonder for productivity. Sometimes when I “lose” myself in a good album, I almost always walk away with a new idea or a fresh perspective. Thanks for the comment Van!

      Reply
  33. Make time for blogging? Pffft. I try to make time to work out and talk to women. What else in life matters? Everyone is always online working so hard, on the grind, but if you just work out and talk to women eventually you’ll find a hot wife with a great job or some of her Daddy’s money. That’s a win/win and then you won’t even have to download Google reader.

    Social media people totally have their priorities mixed up.

    R

    Reply
    • Ryan, if you’re not into blogging, the blogging community and social media, why are you commenting on a blog? hmmm….

      Reply
      • Lindsey meet Ryan Stephens – he’s a sarcastic guy, but that’s part of his charm (and he’s big into blogging and social media – don’t let him fool you). And Ryan, what are you trying to do here, scare my readers off with your male chauvinist comments? Sheesh :)

        Reply
  34. Make time for blogging? Pffft. I try to make time to work out and talk to women. What else in life matters? Everyone is always online working so hard, on the grind, but if you just work out and talk to women eventually you’ll find a hot wife with a great job or some of her Daddy’s money. That’s a win/win and then you won’t even have to download Google reader.

    Social media people totally have their priorities mixed up.

    R

    Reply
    • Ryan, if you’re not into blogging, the blogging community and social media, why are you commenting on a blog? hmmm….

      Reply
      • Lindsey meet Ryan Stephens – he’s a sarcastic guy, but that’s part of his charm (and he’s big into blogging and social media – don’t let him fool you). And Ryan, what are you trying to do here, scare my readers off with your male chauvinist comments? Sheesh :)

        Reply
  35. Well I am honored to be the ‘spark’ of this post, even though it might paint me as a procrastinator. Let’s face it, I got a tweet about this post before it was posted and managed to only be the 18th commenter. :)

    Seriously, though, this is a great post and these are things that I will be focusing on in the future. I think the points about un-multitasking and waking up early are both very important. One point that you missed here but have addressed in other posts is to make a to do list for each day. List out 3-5 things you want to accomplish most throughout the day in order to stay focused. I find that this helps me to stay on task when I post it in plain view on my corkboard.

    Reply
  36. Well I am honored to be the ‘spark’ of this post, even though it might paint me as a procrastinator. Let’s face it, I got a tweet about this post before it was posted and managed to only be the 18th commenter. :)

    Seriously, though, this is a great post and these are things that I will be focusing on in the future. I think the points about un-multitasking and waking up early are both very important. One point that you missed here but have addressed in other posts is to make a to do list for each day. List out 3-5 things you want to accomplish most throughout the day in order to stay focused. I find that this helps me to stay on task when I post it in plain view on my corkboard.

    Reply
  37. Love the idea of your blog as a car…or prehaps an Elephant.

    A slow moving beast that needs constant taps with a stick to keep it going in the right direction. Fail to feed it and it dies, however a few well placed promotion payoffs, like a lump of ginger rammed up the backside, and things can move forward in leaps and bounds.

    Reply
  38. Love the idea of your blog as a car…or prehaps an Elephant.

    A slow moving beast that needs constant taps with a stick to keep it going in the right direction. Fail to feed it and it dies, however a few well placed promotion payoffs, like a lump of ginger rammed up the backside, and things can move forward in leaps and bounds.

    Reply
  39. Hey Matt!

    Long time no talk! Seriously. I’ve been out of my personal Twitter & Blog World for so long, for many different reasons, but I miss the interaction I’ve had with Tweoples such as yourself!

    Thank you for the ‘Google Reader’ suggestion. I think part of the reason I stopped browsing through so many blogs is because I was tired of opening so many new browser tabs! I feel so amateur for not looking too in-depth into the wonder that is Google Reader, but thanks to your latest blog I will definitely check it out.

    Also, as you mentioned that putting investment into a blog is very important (and I enjoyed your comparison to a car), I wanted to ask…do you have any suggestions on starting a blog? I’ve constantly entertained the idea and I know your advice says to try, try and try again, but I think the hardest part of starting it is trying to think what I could write about that is uniquely me yet reaches out to readers, as well. I know I’m probably jumping the gun without actually even figuring out a topic (or list of topics) to blog about. I apologize if you’ve written a blog about this and I’ve missed it!

    Again, keep up the good work and I look forward to hearing from you!

    Cheryl Elizaga
    @CheElizaga

    Reply
    • Suggestions on starting a blog? Honestly – that’s a pretty in-depth conversation. In short, if you WANT to start a blog, start a blog. While I think it’s important to think about why you want to blog and what you hope to get out of it, nothing has to be clearly defined when you start out (this wasn’t, at all, I had no idea it would amount to anything like this). Your purpose and goals will change – so if there is a passion to put your writing out there on a platform for others to read – go ahead and take the plunge. If you want to write, and have something (anything) to write about, you’re ready to get started. Desire is 90% of the fuel that drives a successful blog.

      Reply
  40. Hey Matt!

    Long time no talk! Seriously. I’ve been out of my personal Twitter & Blog World for so long, for many different reasons, but I miss the interaction I’ve had with Tweoples such as yourself!

    Thank you for the ‘Google Reader’ suggestion. I think part of the reason I stopped browsing through so many blogs is because I was tired of opening so many new browser tabs! I feel so amateur for not looking too in-depth into the wonder that is Google Reader, but thanks to your latest blog I will definitely check it out.

    Also, as you mentioned that putting investment into a blog is very important (and I enjoyed your comparison to a car), I wanted to ask…do you have any suggestions on starting a blog? I’ve constantly entertained the idea and I know your advice says to try, try and try again, but I think the hardest part of starting it is trying to think what I could write about that is uniquely me yet reaches out to readers, as well. I know I’m probably jumping the gun without actually even figuring out a topic (or list of topics) to blog about. I apologize if you’ve written a blog about this and I’ve missed it!

    Again, keep up the good work and I look forward to hearing from you!

    Cheryl Elizaga
    @CheElizaga

    Reply
    • Suggestions on starting a blog? Honestly – that’s a pretty in-depth conversation. In short, if you WANT to start a blog, start a blog. While I think it’s important to think about why you want to blog and what you hope to get out of it, nothing has to be clearly defined when you start out (this wasn’t, at all, I had no idea it would amount to anything like this). Your purpose and goals will change – so if there is a passion to put your writing out there on a platform for others to read – go ahead and take the plunge. If you want to write, and have something (anything) to write about, you’re ready to get started. Desire is 90% of the fuel that drives a successful blog.

      Reply
  41. I always find the GTD and productivity discussions interesting. Having traveled a bit now, it’s fascinating how big of an emphasis Americans put on being “productive.” But, somehow, I feel like GTD and productivity and routine becomes so mechanical and doesn’t give any leeway for spontaneity.

    Sacrificing sleep in order to answer people’s emails BEFORE they are even awake? That’s crazy talk, to me. Sleep is one of the most important things for our health, with benefits ranging from a better immune system, happier outlook, weight control, etc.

    While I do think that these tips are helpful, I worry about everyone who is so bent on getting things done that the best thing about their day is the amount of checkmarks on their to do list. And, in my opinion, that’s just not a “productive” way to enjoy life.

    Reply
    • I can only imagine what life is like where you are – I’m assuming much more relaxed and at a slower pace? Probably not too many folks writing about waking up at 5am to complete their to-do list? I long for the day that things will slow down a bit – but understand that being young with so much up in the air, things are going to be a bit hectic these days.

      I do not think, at all, that sleep should be sacraficed – which is why above to “Wake Up Earlier” – not skip sleep. My mantra is I’ll go to bed a little earlier and wake up earlier the next morning to get things done, rather than staying up all night and sleeping until noon the next day. But, to each his own – stay up late, get up early, but still make sure you are getting a healthy amount of sleep.

      It can become too mechanical, I agree – but I also thing by efficiency knocking out your to-do list, you leave more time for the spontaneity. Good thoughts and important takeaways – thanks Jamie.

      Reply
  42. I always find the GTD and productivity discussions interesting. Having traveled a bit now, it’s fascinating how big of an emphasis Americans put on being “productive.” But, somehow, I feel like GTD and productivity and routine becomes so mechanical and doesn’t give any leeway for spontaneity.

    Sacrificing sleep in order to answer people’s emails BEFORE they are even awake? That’s crazy talk, to me. Sleep is one of the most important things for our health, with benefits ranging from a better immune system, happier outlook, weight control, etc.

    While I do think that these tips are helpful, I worry about everyone who is so bent on getting things done that the best thing about their day is the amount of checkmarks on their to do list. And, in my opinion, that’s just not a “productive” way to enjoy life.

    Reply
    • I can only imagine what life is like where you are – I’m assuming much more relaxed and at a slower pace? Probably not too many folks writing about waking up at 5am to complete their to-do list? I long for the day that things will slow down a bit – but understand that being young with so much up in the air, things are going to be a bit hectic these days.

      I do not think, at all, that sleep should be sacraficed – which is why above to “Wake Up Earlier” – not skip sleep. My mantra is I’ll go to bed a little earlier and wake up earlier the next morning to get things done, rather than staying up all night and sleeping until noon the next day. But, to each his own – stay up late, get up early, but still make sure you are getting a healthy amount of sleep.

      It can become too mechanical, I agree – but I also thing by efficiency knocking out your to-do list, you leave more time for the spontaneity. Good thoughts and important takeaways – thanks Jamie.

      Reply
  43. I really liked the ‘wake up early’ & ‘be consistent blogging’ aspects of your post. Those are two things I am definitely working on as I figure all this out. Cheers!

    Reply
  44. I really liked the ‘wake up early’ & ‘be consistent blogging’ aspects of your post. Those are two things I am definitely working on as I figure all this out. Cheers!

    Reply
  45. I make a to-do list. That usually keeps me focused enough to get started on a task, and once I’m immersed, I’m good to go.

    But then, it’s always the distractions online! The temptation to see what other people are up to, refreshing twitter and FB every so often to see if anyone’s posted something new, to see if I’ve got a new message.. drives me nuts! These are browsing habits that I MUST break, or else I won’t get ANYTHING done.

    I’m not a morning person at all though. AT ALL. So the morning option to minimize distractions is not practical for someone who’s not an early bird.

    One thing I DO do when I need to use the computer, but should not be distracted by the internet, is to disable the internet on my laptop. Flip the switch, physically cut the connection. That way I’d be blocking myself from browsing during a brain-freeze. The best way to cure writer’s block is to get up and stretch, maybe give yourself a change of environment, anyway.

    Reply
    • Always a good idea to disable the internet to limit distractions. In the end, it’s all about self discipline. I’m as guilty as the next person as having a million things open all at once – which usually results in getting very little accomplish. Multi-tasking is important, but so is FOCUS and being able to tackle one thing at a time without distractions.

      Reply
  46. I make a to-do list. That usually keeps me focused enough to get started on a task, and once I’m immersed, I’m good to go.

    But then, it’s always the distractions online! The temptation to see what other people are up to, refreshing twitter and FB every so often to see if anyone’s posted something new, to see if I’ve got a new message.. drives me nuts! These are browsing habits that I MUST break, or else I won’t get ANYTHING done.

    I’m not a morning person at all though. AT ALL. So the morning option to minimize distractions is not practical for someone who’s not an early bird.

    One thing I DO do when I need to use the computer, but should not be distracted by the internet, is to disable the internet on my laptop. Flip the switch, physically cut the connection. That way I’d be blocking myself from browsing during a brain-freeze. The best way to cure writer’s block is to get up and stretch, maybe give yourself a change of environment, anyway.

    Reply
    • Always a good idea to disable the internet to limit distractions. In the end, it’s all about self discipline. I’m as guilty as the next person as having a million things open all at once – which usually results in getting very little accomplish. Multi-tasking is important, but so is FOCUS and being able to tackle one thing at a time without distractions.

      Reply
  47. One of the things that gives me an inherent advantage each day is to make a to-do list. But formulate it the night before. This leaves no time the next day for procrastination. Often times tasks have an assigned time value to them. This time value is not necessarily a limit, but a goal. A reasonable amount of time that I think each task can be accomplished in. This goes for both repeat and one-time tasks, online tasks and offline tasks.

    I wholeheartedly agree with the use of Google Reader. I know there are many out there that discourage its use, and there can be a certain point of information overload, but why not have an initial filter that I can use to drill down to what I want, and what catches my eye instead of having to look for it. There are certain bloggers and search terms I want to watch regularly. What better way to do it?

    Reply
    • I couldn’t live without Google Reader – I’m already way behind using that – much less trying to remember everyone’s blog URLs. And to your other point – I am nuts when it comes to to-do lists. Making a to-do list is on my to-do list. It’s sick, I know – but whatever works, right?

      Reply
  48. One of the things that gives me an inherent advantage each day is to make a to-do list. But formulate it the night before. This leaves no time the next day for procrastination. Often times tasks have an assigned time value to them. This time value is not necessarily a limit, but a goal. A reasonable amount of time that I think each task can be accomplished in. This goes for both repeat and one-time tasks, online tasks and offline tasks.

    I wholeheartedly agree with the use of Google Reader. I know there are many out there that discourage its use, and there can be a certain point of information overload, but why not have an initial filter that I can use to drill down to what I want, and what catches my eye instead of having to look for it. There are certain bloggers and search terms I want to watch regularly. What better way to do it?

    Reply
    • I couldn’t live without Google Reader – I’m already way behind using that – much less trying to remember everyone’s blog URLs. And to your other point – I am nuts when it comes to to-do lists. Making a to-do list is on my to-do list. It’s sick, I know – but whatever works, right?

      Reply
  49. I have a question about twitter and google reader.
    So you use both? For a while now I’ve had twitter replace google reader and have decided it’s not always in my best interest to keep up to date on all the blogs all the time.
    I’m wondering what your thoughts are on that. Do you chat more on twitter, then check google reader to see what new posts have come up? I combine twitter to do those two things, but I’m sure I miss a heck of a lot of blog posts.

    Reply
    • I hear what you are saying Steven – for the longest time I just relied on Twitter as my primary source to find blog posts – and I still do consider that my number one resource for discovering NEW writers. But there comes a time when you really become a fan of particular blog and you want the latest updates all in one place. That’s the benefit of Google Reader to me – keeping tabs on some of my favorites and having a “one stop shop” to organize everything. Now, without it, I’d be lost and I’d miss out on a ton of great posts.

      Short answer: Use both!

      Reply
      • I agree. I’ve found a whole lot of new writers and people to talk to on twitter. But there always was something exciting about getting the latest posts from blogs each evening.

        Reply
  50. I have a question about twitter and google reader.
    So you use both? For a while now I’ve had twitter replace google reader and have decided it’s not always in my best interest to keep up to date on all the blogs all the time.
    I’m wondering what your thoughts are on that. Do you chat more on twitter, then check google reader to see what new posts have come up? I combine twitter to do those two things, but I’m sure I miss a heck of a lot of blog posts.

    Reply
    • I hear what you are saying Steven – for the longest time I just relied on Twitter as my primary source to find blog posts – and I still do consider that my number one resource for discovering NEW writers. But there comes a time when you really become a fan of particular blog and you want the latest updates all in one place. That’s the benefit of Google Reader to me – keeping tabs on some of my favorites and having a “one stop shop” to organize everything. Now, without it, I’d be lost and I’d miss out on a ton of great posts.

      Short answer: Use both!

      Reply
      • I agree. I’ve found a whole lot of new writers and people to talk to on twitter. But there always was something exciting about getting the latest posts from blogs each evening.

        Reply
  51. @Matt: Try listening to audiobooks or learning a language. I got through the entire Malcom Gladwell trilogy in a week while sitting in traffic. You could even go through a personal development course. It’s amazing how much you can do during that time.

    Reply
    • Yeah – I need to make an investment in Audible (or something similar) and take advantage of that time spent in the car…Do you use a particular service for audiobooks?

      Reply
  52. Matt,

    I’m a fairly early riser so I have that one tackled. I’ve been contemplating moving to Google reader from using Netnewswire. I’m wondering if it will increase my productivity. Only way to find out is test it out for one week and see how the two compare for me. With my ADHD one activity at a time is essential. My #1 tip for productive blogging is using a distraction free writing tool. Just a black screen with green text. That way nothing can both me when I’m writing a blog psot. Another thing I do is I’ll batch blog posts together or batch tasks together.

    Reply
    • Some of my most productive time is when I go somewhere that doesn’t have wifi (not many places like that exist anymore) – forcing yourself to focus isn’t such a bad thing and can really give you a boost in productivity. I try to take time at least once a week to completely unplug and get writing done.

      Also – with Google Reader – it’s all about making time for it and staying within that time frame. I usually check my Google Reader first thing in the morning and once mid-afternoon. That way I’m not sporadically reading blogs and writing comments all day – Don’t get me wrong, I love it, but it can be uber-distracting…

      Reply
  53. Matt,

    I’m a fairly early riser so I have that one tackled. I’ve been contemplating moving to Google reader from using Netnewswire. I’m wondering if it will increase my productivity. Only way to find out is test it out for one week and see how the two compare for me. With my ADHD one activity at a time is essential. My #1 tip for productive blogging is using a distraction free writing tool. Just a black screen with green text. That way nothing can both me when I’m writing a blog psot. Another thing I do is I’ll batch blog posts together or batch tasks together.

    Reply
    • Some of my most productive time is when I go somewhere that doesn’t have wifi (not many places like that exist anymore) – forcing yourself to focus isn’t such a bad thing and can really give you a boost in productivity. I try to take time at least once a week to completely unplug and get writing done.

      Also – with Google Reader – it’s all about making time for it and staying within that time frame. I usually check my Google Reader first thing in the morning and once mid-afternoon. That way I’m not sporadically reading blogs and writing comments all day – Don’t get me wrong, I love it, but it can be uber-distracting…

      Reply
  54. I have the same problem, Lindsey. There are way too many distractions on the Internet when I’m trying to get something done. I also am the time of person who likes to be working on about 2-3 projects at the same time, but I’ve learned even if you’re not focusing on one thing, you need to dedicate time to only be doing one thing for at least a 2-3 hour stretch at a time. Otherwise, I’ll half-ass all my projects. :P

    Reply
    • Multi-tasking is overrated – that’s for sure. I used to be this way (trying to tackle a million things at once) but have really developed the focused “take one thing at a time” attitude. It’s really improved my overall productivity. It’s good practice to see a project through from start to finish (when possible) – cutting out the noise and limiting other online distractions is critical to making this happen. Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
  55. Well ,your details is really reasonable and you guy give us valuable informative post. I actually love playing various sports and I believe only sports can make you energetic. I like this forum because I learned so much knowledge in here,and there are all kinds of newest news to us
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    Reply
  56. What do you recommend for a feed reader now that google reader is ending. Personally I love google reader and I am playing around with Feedly but it isn’t as easy to use in my opinion. Thoughts?

    Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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