Twitter vs. Facebook

Facebook is either desperate or brilliant. They’ve been rolling out the punches this week – first with their aquistion of FriendFeed, then in their addition of Realtime Facebook Search, and now they have plans to release a stripped-down over-simplified version of their platform aptly named ‘Facebook Lite‘.

Myspace

I’m not here to break the news, but rather to assess the situation. In an episode of my podcast I talked about the natural progression we seem to be witnessing in social media.  Myspace started it all, full of options and customization potential – it was the first real social media success story.

Facebook

Enter Facebook stage left. When it came onto the scene we all loved it’s exclusivity – limited to college kids, very simple and clean design. Options and customization was limited but it was much better for networking and remembering the name of that girl you made out with at the party last night. As time went on, Myspace fell by the wayside and the sleeker, simpler Facebook took over.

Twitter

And then there’s Twitter – still a relative newb to the social media soiree. But once again, it has branded itself as an ultra-simplistic networking tool – going so far as to limiting how much you can say – and look where it is today. In sheer membership numbers, it still doesn’t hold a candle to Facebook, but it’s trending popularity cannot be denied.

Twitter was initially appealing to most of us because of it’s streamline approach. It made connecting and networking more efficient and served (and continues to serve) as a valuable promotional tool for our blogs and companies. Most of us keep Facebook around primarily to keep in touch with friends from our past – but in a personal/professional growth sense, we live and die by our 140 character tweets.

‘Diet’ Facebook?

And now the vicious cycle continues with the newly announced ‘Facebook Lite’ – will it be effective? Or is it Facebook’s desperate attempt to keep up with the trend?

Some Questions to think about and discuss:

  • What’s Facebook Lite’s angle? Is it to directly combat the simplistic approach of Twitter?
  • Which do you value more? Customization/options or simplicity?
  • Can less really be more?
  • What can/should Twitter with their platform in response?
  • What’s the next step for social media evolution?

Update: @morganives shared the following link which claims ‘Facebook Lite’ is not, in fact a ‘Twitter Killer’ but is instead is planned for use in parts of the world where internet is slow and/or expensive: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/08/12/AR2009081200580.html

Join the conversation! 46 Comments

  1. It’s hard to judge on a product that we don’t know the final form it will take, but as it sounds Facebook Lite will basically be a Facebook version of Twitter, which I may just find redundant. If I want to exchange ideas in 140 characters with new people/friends I’ll use Twitter, if I want to share picts and keep in touch with friends I’ll use facebook. There are a limited number of social media we can be active (daily/weekly), adding a new media has to bring new features that existing ones don’t have to make it worth joining, it doesn’t seem like facebook lide is doing that.

    Reply
    • Agree – it’s an interesting step, and if there is more to it than simply being a new platform for internet users with poor connectivity (which I have no doubt that there is) then I’m not sure what the angle is. Replicating something that already works doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.

      I guess a better question would be, “How can Twitter be improved” – do we really even want anything new right now? Or are we content with what’s on our plate already?

      Reply
  2. It’s hard to judge on a product that we don’t know the final form it will take, but as it sounds Facebook Lite will basically be a Facebook version of Twitter, which I may just find redundant. If I want to exchange ideas in 140 characters with new people/friends I’ll use Twitter, if I want to share picts and keep in touch with friends I’ll use facebook. There are a limited number of social media we can be active (daily/weekly), adding a new media has to bring new features that existing ones don’t have to make it worth joining, it doesn’t seem like facebook lide is doing that.

    Reply
    • Agree – it’s an interesting step, and if there is more to it than simply being a new platform for internet users with poor connectivity (which I have no doubt that there is) then I’m not sure what the angle is. Replicating something that already works doesn’t make a whole lot of sense.

      I guess a better question would be, “How can Twitter be improved” – do we really even want anything new right now? Or are we content with what’s on our plate already?

      Reply
  3. I think this is probably a big fail on facebooks part. I’m a strong believer in the natural progression of technolog and that includes web technology as well. Facebook continues to try to be something they’re not and instead of building deeper more robust features they are spreading themselves thin.

    I for one think facebook should ignore Twitter completely and focus on building local networks instead. I wrote about that recently here http://bit.ly/15EeCz . A recent study showed that 74% of facebooks revenue came from local small/med sized businesses. yet, there are few if any features that focus on local on the Facebook platform. So, anyone who went to Harvard, ahem Mr. Zuckerburg, should know to follow the 80/20 rule.

    Goliath can’t win by copying David’s fighting style.

    Reply
    • I’m with you in that I see Facebook’s overall approach as flawed. They are starting to get their hands in too much when they should instead focus on what works. Myspace is on the back-burner because all of the options become overwhelming, we wanted something simpler – in comes Facebook – and now Twitter.

      You’re article on ‘Facebook local’ makes a lot of sense. As you and I have discussed in the past – this was the initial draw to Facebook, the ability to build your local network and connect with people in your city/school/etc. Facebook also has an effective advertising approach in place (that works) – with advertising that specifically targets local consumers – I’ve actually clicked advertisements from local companies – something I would never do on Google or elsewhere. Your David and Goliath analogy is spot on. Take what works and optimize it, don’t replicate the competition.

      Reply
  4. I think this is probably a big fail on facebooks part. I’m a strong believer in the natural progression of technolog and that includes web technology as well. Facebook continues to try to be something they’re not and instead of building deeper more robust features they are spreading themselves thin.

    I for one think facebook should ignore Twitter completely and focus on building local networks instead. I wrote about that recently here http://bit.ly/15EeCz . A recent study showed that 74% of facebooks revenue came from local small/med sized businesses. yet, there are few if any features that focus on local on the Facebook platform. So, anyone who went to Harvard, ahem Mr. Zuckerburg, should know to follow the 80/20 rule.

    Goliath can’t win by copying David’s fighting style.

    Reply
    • I’m with you in that I see Facebook’s overall approach as flawed. They are starting to get their hands in too much when they should instead focus on what works. Myspace is on the back-burner because all of the options become overwhelming, we wanted something simpler – in comes Facebook – and now Twitter.

      You’re article on ‘Facebook local’ makes a lot of sense. As you and I have discussed in the past – this was the initial draw to Facebook, the ability to build your local network and connect with people in your city/school/etc. Facebook also has an effective advertising approach in place (that works) – with advertising that specifically targets local consumers – I’ve actually clicked advertisements from local companies – something I would never do on Google or elsewhere. Your David and Goliath analogy is spot on. Take what works and optimize it, don’t replicate the competition.

      Reply
  5. Hmm…I sort of embrace change, but at the same time everytime Facebook went through their “change” aesthetically or even with functionality I sort of resisted it.

    The thing is–I’m happy with the way Facebook works now. I use Twitter and I think that they’re both somewhat similar that I’m not sure what Facebook Lite can bring. Why not do what you do really well? I’m not sure–it’s already overwhelming when we combine every single social media tool we have into one even though I do use it…Hmm…it will be really interesting to see what unfolds.

    Reply
    • Yeah I’m sort of in that ‘what’s the point?’ state of mind. Facebook has it’s place in all of our hearts – to maintain connectivity on a more personal level – anytime I want to see who’s getting married, I can log into Facebook and be instantly enlightened. But if I’m promoting my blog, sharing articles from the web, or developing my personal brand, Facebook is an afterthought. It wasn’t until recently that I decided to cross platforms and add a life without pants ‘fan page’ – which has done surprisingly well – but then again, my bar was set pretty low. As you said, it will be interesting to see where social media goes next – at this point I think all we can do is sit back and enjoy the ride.

      Reply
  6. Hmm…I sort of embrace change, but at the same time everytime Facebook went through their “change” aesthetically or even with functionality I sort of resisted it.

    The thing is–I’m happy with the way Facebook works now. I use Twitter and I think that they’re both somewhat similar that I’m not sure what Facebook Lite can bring. Why not do what you do really well? I’m not sure–it’s already overwhelming when we combine every single social media tool we have into one even though I do use it…Hmm…it will be really interesting to see what unfolds.

    Reply
    • Yeah I’m sort of in that ‘what’s the point?’ state of mind. Facebook has it’s place in all of our hearts – to maintain connectivity on a more personal level – anytime I want to see who’s getting married, I can log into Facebook and be instantly enlightened. But if I’m promoting my blog, sharing articles from the web, or developing my personal brand, Facebook is an afterthought. It wasn’t until recently that I decided to cross platforms and add a life without pants ‘fan page’ – which has done surprisingly well – but then again, my bar was set pretty low. As you said, it will be interesting to see where social media goes next – at this point I think all we can do is sit back and enjoy the ride.

      Reply
  7. I’ve never liked diet soda. It’s simply a “modified” version of the original, but with a nastier taste.

    I feel the same way when it comes to ‘Diet’ Facebook.

    I admire Facebook’s ambition and attempt at improving itself, but in my mind improving yourself is all about doing something more..Doing something you haven’t done before. It’s the same case with social media.

    I enjoy Facebook, because it gives me the chance to stay in touch with friends and family. I enjoy Twitter, because it gives me the opportunity to have real-time conversations with people throughout the world and network like never before. Both contribute differently to social media and that’s what I like about them.

    Social Media is about new stages, growth, learning, and development. What would be the fun in Facebook took over everything? How is that helping social media grow? ….It’s not.

    Reply
    • I think you can improve by doing something BETTER than the competition – but it has to go beyond that – it also needs to be unique (Read: How to Compete by Being Unique by yours truly – http://under30ceo.com/2009/07/15/how-to-compete-by-being-unique/)

      I think we are far from seeing a monopoly in the social media world – as you pointed out, there is a time and place for each of these platforms, and it will continue to be survival of the fittest. It’s interesting (not to mention exciting) to be sitting on the front row, witnessing this 12-round Apollo Creed/Rocky Balboa throwdown between Facebook and Twitter – the now apparent leaders in the social media game (although don’t count out ‘Drago’ aka LinkedIn – he did after all kill Apollo in the 4th movie).

      Reply
  8. I’ve never liked diet soda. It’s simply a “modified” version of the original, but with a nastier taste.

    I feel the same way when it comes to ‘Diet’ Facebook.

    I admire Facebook’s ambition and attempt at improving itself, but in my mind improving yourself is all about doing something more..Doing something you haven’t done before. It’s the same case with social media.

    I enjoy Facebook, because it gives me the chance to stay in touch with friends and family. I enjoy Twitter, because it gives me the opportunity to have real-time conversations with people throughout the world and network like never before. Both contribute differently to social media and that’s what I like about them.

    Social Media is about new stages, growth, learning, and development. What would be the fun in Facebook took over everything? How is that helping social media grow? ….It’s not.

    Reply
    • I think you can improve by doing something BETTER than the competition – but it has to go beyond that – it also needs to be unique (Read: How to Compete by Being Unique by yours truly – http://under30ceo.com/2009/07/15/how-to-compete-by-being-unique/)

      I think we are far from seeing a monopoly in the social media world – as you pointed out, there is a time and place for each of these platforms, and it will continue to be survival of the fittest. It’s interesting (not to mention exciting) to be sitting on the front row, witnessing this 12-round Apollo Creed/Rocky Balboa throwdown between Facebook and Twitter – the now apparent leaders in the social media game (although don’t count out ‘Drago’ aka LinkedIn – he did after all kill Apollo in the 4th movie).

      Reply
  9. oh man, I am so happy to add a counter opinion to this conversation. I feel like facebook has been reading my diary again because this is a pretty solid topic that comes to mind when people try to explain to me the importance and usage of Twitter.

    The truth is, for the common everyday folk, twitter is just about utterly pointless. We can use it to catch information from bloggers, corporations, newscasters, and record labels. Such and such like that is always helpful, but for the everyday user without a heavy fanbase or product to sell, twitter comes up short.

    In my opinion, there is no equity to be built for the everyday user. For a blogger, thoughts and comments that attract retweets or @ tags are great because they increase your brand. But for the average user, sharing information, retweets, and at replies are about as useful as collecting pokemon. It’s fun and addicting, but there’s nothing to be gained at the end of the day.

    So while I think Twitter is great and yes, it is a speedy source of information, I have little to no equity to gain from putting in the time and effort necessary to create a successful twitter account. Mostly, I don’t want to find all 600 of my facebook friends all over again, just to post a simple status update, which I could obviously do with facebook from the get-go. However, if Twitter had been hosted by Facebook from the get-go, than there would be no need to re-add friends or start from scratch. I could simply tweet and all my friends could reply and comment.

    The problem I think a lot of you are dealing with is audience. Twitter is a separate product from Facebook, and a more valuable resource for spreading information and building popularity, but unless you are willing to put in the time and the commitment to be a part of the conversation, it’s like you’re not allowed in the door. I tweet once every few days, but am not dedicated enough to create a following so only a handful of people will ever see what I mention.

    Where Facebook Lite will pester the Twitter-sphere and it’s users, everyday average Joe’s like myself will find a lot of fun and addiction in the simplicity of facebook lite. And once average users catch the Twitter bug, it’s only a matter of time before they take their newly gained skills, and apply them back into the micro blogging realm that is Twitter.

    Basically – Different Audiences. – You’re going to appeal to every day users. – They will grow comfortable and join twitter. – Does anyone remember the Old Facebook? We petitioned for it. We made groups. And looking back, I have no idea what it looked like to begin with.

    Reply
    • I agree completely, that for most people who aren’t bloggers, don’t like real breaking news, don’t like sports or athletes, aren’t interested in celebrities, would rather be surprised rather than warned that their train is late, or simply can’t read Twitter is useless.

      I can’t agree with the prediction that Facebook Lite will be a gateway drug to Twitter. I just don’t see people test driving a microblogging platform that goes easy on the features and then opting for the more advanced microblogging (is that an oxymoron?) platform.

      Reply
      • You’re right Julian – whether we realize it or not, there is an ‘exclusivity’ to the Twitter ‘club’ – almost like you need a green jacket to be accepted and welcomed in the door. If you’re out, you’re out, but once you’re in, you’re in. It’s an interesting situation that honestly, I can’t really explain.

        There is a place for all of these social media platforms – the problem with Facebook is that they are all over the place in their approach. Instead of focusing on a few key things that they do best, they’re trying to figure out how to do everything, and how to do everything better than the competition. The path to success (usually) isn’t about simply being better, it’s about offering something unique.

        Reply
  10. oh man, I am so happy to add a counter opinion to this conversation. I feel like facebook has been reading my diary again because this is a pretty solid topic that comes to mind when people try to explain to me the importance and usage of Twitter.

    The truth is, for the common everyday folk, twitter is just about utterly pointless. We can use it to catch information from bloggers, corporations, newscasters, and record labels. Such and such like that is always helpful, but for the everyday user without a heavy fanbase or product to sell, twitter comes up short.

    In my opinion, there is no equity to be built for the everyday user. For a blogger, thoughts and comments that attract retweets or @ tags are great because they increase your brand. But for the average user, sharing information, retweets, and at replies are about as useful as collecting pokemon. It’s fun and addicting, but there’s nothing to be gained at the end of the day.

    So while I think Twitter is great and yes, it is a speedy source of information, I have little to no equity to gain from putting in the time and effort necessary to create a successful twitter account. Mostly, I don’t want to find all 600 of my facebook friends all over again, just to post a simple status update, which I could obviously do with facebook from the get-go. However, if Twitter had been hosted by Facebook from the get-go, than there would be no need to re-add friends or start from scratch. I could simply tweet and all my friends could reply and comment.

    The problem I think a lot of you are dealing with is audience. Twitter is a separate product from Facebook, and a more valuable resource for spreading information and building popularity, but unless you are willing to put in the time and the commitment to be a part of the conversation, it’s like you’re not allowed in the door. I tweet once every few days, but am not dedicated enough to create a following so only a handful of people will ever see what I mention.

    Where Facebook Lite will pester the Twitter-sphere and it’s users, everyday average Joe’s like myself will find a lot of fun and addiction in the simplicity of facebook lite. And once average users catch the Twitter bug, it’s only a matter of time before they take their newly gained skills, and apply them back into the micro blogging realm that is Twitter.

    Basically – Different Audiences. – You’re going to appeal to every day users. – They will grow comfortable and join twitter. – Does anyone remember the Old Facebook? We petitioned for it. We made groups. And looking back, I have no idea what it looked like to begin with.

    Reply
    • I agree completely, that for most people who aren’t bloggers, don’t like real breaking news, don’t like sports or athletes, aren’t interested in celebrities, would rather be surprised rather than warned that their train is late, or simply can’t read Twitter is useless.

      I can’t agree with the prediction that Facebook Lite will be a gateway drug to Twitter. I just don’t see people test driving a microblogging platform that goes easy on the features and then opting for the more advanced microblogging (is that an oxymoron?) platform.

      Reply
      • You’re right Julian – whether we realize it or not, there is an ‘exclusivity’ to the Twitter ‘club’ – almost like you need a green jacket to be accepted and welcomed in the door. If you’re out, you’re out, but once you’re in, you’re in. It’s an interesting situation that honestly, I can’t really explain.

        There is a place for all of these social media platforms – the problem with Facebook is that they are all over the place in their approach. Instead of focusing on a few key things that they do best, they’re trying to figure out how to do everything, and how to do everything better than the competition. The path to success (usually) isn’t about simply being better, it’s about offering something unique.

        Reply
  11. First, props for using the word “soiree,” haha. Personally, I think Facebook Lite may be good for some of the newer users that are in higher age brackets that don’t quite “get” some of the complexities of Facebook, but for people who have been using it for a while, I don’t see much of a reason to switch. As it stands right now, I don’t think Facebook and Twitter are really in a position where they’re in direct competition with each other (at least in the ways I use each of them). With MySpace in Facebook, they had very similar purposes. But, as you mentioned, Twitter is more for personal/professional growth, whereas Facebook is more for your personal “friends” (I use the term friends loosely).

    As far as next move for Facebook, I think that with more and more computers coming with webcams and viddler and vimeo on the rise for video blogging, maybe Facebook needs to embrace video messages. I don’t know if an acquisition of Viddler or Vimeo would be feasible or likely, but imagine being able to send a video birthday message to your friend just as easily as it is to write on their wall.

    Do you think I’m crazy? Or do you see video being a good move?

    Reply
    • I think there is a very big opportunity to further incorporate video into the social media scene – then again – I think there is something that people are drawn to about the ‘anonymity’ of it all. Yes, we have our little avatar to show who we are – but we can still limit how much we really let people in. Video breaks those walls down. There are a lot of folks out there who are uncomfortable with the idea of video-messaging and blogging.

      Is it just me, or am I seeing a reoccurring pattern in terms of our personal ‘real life’ friends being on Facebook while our online connections and blogging friends are on Twitter? It’s interesting to me that so few of my ‘offline’ friends are online on Twitter. Why do you think they are hesitant to jump into the (lol) soiree?

      Reply
      • I thought I replied to this, I must have “x-ed” out before i pushed send though. First of all, props on using “soiree” again, lol. Personally, most of my friends don’t like Twitter because they want to use Twitter like Facebook to follow their friends. This doesn’t work both because it doesn’t do anything more than status updates for them and most of their friends aren’t on Twitter. So, for that type purpose, there isn’t really that much added value to their lives.

        Reply
  12. First, props for using the word “soiree,” haha. Personally, I think Facebook Lite may be good for some of the newer users that are in higher age brackets that don’t quite “get” some of the complexities of Facebook, but for people who have been using it for a while, I don’t see much of a reason to switch. As it stands right now, I don’t think Facebook and Twitter are really in a position where they’re in direct competition with each other (at least in the ways I use each of them). With MySpace in Facebook, they had very similar purposes. But, as you mentioned, Twitter is more for personal/professional growth, whereas Facebook is more for your personal “friends” (I use the term friends loosely).

    As far as next move for Facebook, I think that with more and more computers coming with webcams and viddler and vimeo on the rise for video blogging, maybe Facebook needs to embrace video messages. I don’t know if an acquisition of Viddler or Vimeo would be feasible or likely, but imagine being able to send a video birthday message to your friend just as easily as it is to write on their wall.

    Do you think I’m crazy? Or do you see video being a good move?

    Reply
    • I think there is a very big opportunity to further incorporate video into the social media scene – then again – I think there is something that people are drawn to about the ‘anonymity’ of it all. Yes, we have our little avatar to show who we are – but we can still limit how much we really let people in. Video breaks those walls down. There are a lot of folks out there who are uncomfortable with the idea of video-messaging and blogging.

      Is it just me, or am I seeing a reoccurring pattern in terms of our personal ‘real life’ friends being on Facebook while our online connections and blogging friends are on Twitter? It’s interesting to me that so few of my ‘offline’ friends are online on Twitter. Why do you think they are hesitant to jump into the (lol) soiree?

      Reply
      • I thought I replied to this, I must have “x-ed” out before i pushed send though. First of all, props on using “soiree” again, lol. Personally, most of my friends don’t like Twitter because they want to use Twitter like Facebook to follow their friends. This doesn’t work both because it doesn’t do anything more than status updates for them and most of their friends aren’t on Twitter. So, for that type purpose, there isn’t really that much added value to their lives.

        Reply
  13. Facebook has proven that they can overtake another huge site (myspace) and become the best. The middle aged to older crowd is slowly using fb more and more but even more importantly, the younger teenaged crowd is also moving towards logging into fb more than ms. I’m generally speaking from seeing the adults and kids in my community but I feel it’s a good assumption.

    It could be that’s just the mentality fb has. We can do it better. Will it benefit fb at all? Who knows. They may just be doing it for kicks. Facebook is the Google of the social network world. And just like google, they’re going to put out what they want, no matter the competition.

    I do like the video idea though. Quick, someone loan me a few million so I can start my own video social media site so that I can overthrow fb, youtube, and twitter.

    Reply
    • Nate – I think to us ‘social media snobs’ Facebook is seen as old news, but what I realized today, when giving a presentation on social media to the staff at my office – most of which are extremely non-tech savvy – the only platform they were even familiar with was Facebook – so clearly there is still a huge opportunity for them to achieve success – it’s simply a matter of realizing what they do best and optimizing their strengths, rather than trying to do everything all at once.

      Reply
      • Totally agree. Sometimes you have to put yourself in the shoes of the non-web type in order to understand how to market to them. I find it funny that some people will be so interested in hearing about a mundane web thing that I do when to me it’s really old news. I love facebook and am trying a few new things to take advantage of getting those users who aren’t on every social media site. It’s really the majority of people out there, so if you can tap into it, it could be big business.

        Reply
  14. Facebook has proven that they can overtake another huge site (myspace) and become the best. The middle aged to older crowd is slowly using fb more and more but even more importantly, the younger teenaged crowd is also moving towards logging into fb more than ms. I’m generally speaking from seeing the adults and kids in my community but I feel it’s a good assumption.

    It could be that’s just the mentality fb has. We can do it better. Will it benefit fb at all? Who knows. They may just be doing it for kicks. Facebook is the Google of the social network world. And just like google, they’re going to put out what they want, no matter the competition.

    I do like the video idea though. Quick, someone loan me a few million so I can start my own video social media site so that I can overthrow fb, youtube, and twitter.

    Reply
    • Nate – I think to us ‘social media snobs’ Facebook is seen as old news, but what I realized today, when giving a presentation on social media to the staff at my office – most of which are extremely non-tech savvy – the only platform they were even familiar with was Facebook – so clearly there is still a huge opportunity for them to achieve success – it’s simply a matter of realizing what they do best and optimizing their strengths, rather than trying to do everything all at once.

      Reply
      • Totally agree. Sometimes you have to put yourself in the shoes of the non-web type in order to understand how to market to them. I find it funny that some people will be so interested in hearing about a mundane web thing that I do when to me it’s really old news. I love facebook and am trying a few new things to take advantage of getting those users who aren’t on every social media site. It’s really the majority of people out there, so if you can tap into it, it could be big business.

        Reply
  15. While always being a fan of changing for growth, I am not a fan of changing for the sake of change. Does Facebook think that their new site is going to “take down” Twitter? And at what point will they sacrifice the wants of their current users in a quest to “be like” something else.

    I use Facebook for my friends. Until recently I only had 2 people as “friends” that I had never met before. I share stories & photos, keep in touch with old friends, plan events with groups, and tons of other things that (as Rikin mentioned) foster local communities. And I don’t mean local like “I’m friends with all these cool folks in Portland, ME” but moreso the “It takes a village” type community that we surround ourselves with.

    I’m all for Facebook trying to make itself better and grow, that’s important to ANY entity. I’m not sure, however, if trying to make yourself like something else, that you are going to be as strong as if you just embrace the qualifities that make you “you.”

    Reply
    • Well word on the street is ‘Facebook Lite’ is for areas of the world with limited or weak internet connectivity (it’s simplistic design means faster load times). I think most of us are not naive enough to believe that is the sole purpose of this release. They’re not going to compete by replicating – they have to focus on what works instead of, as you say, changing for the sake of change.

      Reply
  16. While always being a fan of changing for growth, I am not a fan of changing for the sake of change. Does Facebook think that their new site is going to “take down” Twitter? And at what point will they sacrifice the wants of their current users in a quest to “be like” something else.

    I use Facebook for my friends. Until recently I only had 2 people as “friends” that I had never met before. I share stories & photos, keep in touch with old friends, plan events with groups, and tons of other things that (as Rikin mentioned) foster local communities. And I don’t mean local like “I’m friends with all these cool folks in Portland, ME” but moreso the “It takes a village” type community that we surround ourselves with.

    I’m all for Facebook trying to make itself better and grow, that’s important to ANY entity. I’m not sure, however, if trying to make yourself like something else, that you are going to be as strong as if you just embrace the qualifities that make you “you.”

    Reply
    • Well word on the street is ‘Facebook Lite’ is for areas of the world with limited or weak internet connectivity (it’s simplistic design means faster load times). I think most of us are not naive enough to believe that is the sole purpose of this release. They’re not going to compete by replicating – they have to focus on what works instead of, as you say, changing for the sake of change.

      Reply
  17. Huh, very fascinating development in the world of social media. I love Facebook, but it will always remain the network through which I connect with my offline friends. Therefore, in Facebook i don’t value simplicity – I want the option to write a lot on my friends’ walls, view all their pictures, post notes for my best friends to see, and so on. I like having the multiple options that Facebook gives you and would not want it to become more twitter-esque because that defeats my purpose. Yes, I want to write a paragraph on my friends wall if I want to.

    I like to keep Twitter simple and the way it is – if twitter got all complicated suddenly I’d surely drop it. I think each social network should occupy a different niche in its market and target different audiences, slightly, otherwise they will cease to be successful.

    Reply
    • Agreed – stick to your niche and concentrate on depth of features. The way you use Facebook is how I think most of us prefer to use it but unfortunately they keep wanting to be something else. Applications, fan pages, search, etc.; I’m sorry but it all seems like noise to me.

      Reply
    • I wonder who came up with the ‘rules’ for how to use each tool – it’s interesting to me how we are unanimous in what each ‘should’ be used for. With that being said, you hit the nail on the head – each network can and should occupy their own niche. Understand what you’re good at, and focus on improving those points. Don’t try to be something you’re not.

      Reply
  18. Huh, very fascinating development in the world of social media. I love Facebook, but it will always remain the network through which I connect with my offline friends. Therefore, in Facebook i don’t value simplicity – I want the option to write a lot on my friends’ walls, view all their pictures, post notes for my best friends to see, and so on. I like having the multiple options that Facebook gives you and would not want it to become more twitter-esque because that defeats my purpose. Yes, I want to write a paragraph on my friends wall if I want to.

    I like to keep Twitter simple and the way it is – if twitter got all complicated suddenly I’d surely drop it. I think each social network should occupy a different niche in its market and target different audiences, slightly, otherwise they will cease to be successful.

    Reply
    • Agreed – stick to your niche and concentrate on depth of features. The way you use Facebook is how I think most of us prefer to use it but unfortunately they keep wanting to be something else. Applications, fan pages, search, etc.; I’m sorry but it all seems like noise to me.

      Reply
    • I wonder who came up with the ‘rules’ for how to use each tool – it’s interesting to me how we are unanimous in what each ‘should’ be used for. With that being said, you hit the nail on the head – each network can and should occupy their own niche. Understand what you’re good at, and focus on improving those points. Don’t try to be something you’re not.

      Reply
  19. While there is some underlining punch to Twitter to become more like it, everything I have read is geared towards the use of Facebook Lite on a slower internet connection. Check out this article http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/chris-dannen/techwatch/facebook-lite-just-isnt-twitter

    From the article you can see that is isn’t even being released in the US initially but being tested overseas in places like India, Russia and China where there are people who don’t have broadband. It will also help with rendering on Netbooks and phones that use 3G so they won’t have to render as many images.

    As always I am still skeptical to their true intentions and still think that they’re bitter because twitter refused $500million from them! But this is where true innovations comes from, when you need to dig in deep and truly find out ways to out maneuver the competition. So I say let the battles begin!

    Reply
  20. While there is some underlining punch to Twitter to become more like it, everything I have read is geared towards the use of Facebook Lite on a slower internet connection. Check out this article http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/chris-dannen/techwatch/facebook-lite-just-isnt-twitter

    From the article you can see that is isn’t even being released in the US initially but being tested overseas in places like India, Russia and China where there are people who don’t have broadband. It will also help with rendering on Netbooks and phones that use 3G so they won’t have to render as many images.

    As always I am still skeptical to their true intentions and still think that they’re bitter because twitter refused $500million from them! But this is where true innovations comes from, when you need to dig in deep and truly find out ways to out maneuver the competition. So I say let the battles begin!

    Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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