The following is a guest post by Srinivas Rao. Srinivas is a personal development blogger at The Skool of Life where he writes about surfing, personal development and and has a dream to travel the world and surf as much as possible. He also runs a weekly podcast series over at BlogCastFM. Mega props to Srvinias for taking the time to put this together for Life Without Pants.

As I’ve started to prepare for my first speech to current students at the MBA program I recently graduated from, I started to brainstorm reasons for them to be open to the idea of starting a blog.  As I looked back over the last several months and watched this great video by Matt, I realized that running blog gives you a great opportunity to develop certain essential skills for business success.

8 KEY SKILLS LEARNED FROM BLOGGING

Leadership: No matter how you look at it, if you are running a blog you are leading people. If you accept guest posts on your blog, this is a perfect example of developing leadership skills. You have to reach out to people, hold them accountable, and get them to deliver. To add to all this, they’re not even getting paid most of the time. The fact that you are developing an ability to get people who are not getting paid to help you is a tremendously valuable way to develop yourself as a leader.

Teamwork: I’ve said before that blogging is a team sport. The future of this business is collaboration. Even as an individual blogger you are running a team of people. Every time somebody writes a guest post on your blog, retweets one of your posts, or plugs you in any way, they have become a part of your team and you are a part of theirs. Gordie Rogers has done an excellent job turning his readers into a team by making them regular contributors to his site.

Marketing: If you can market yourself with little to no resources then you can easily go into a company that gives you a budget and market their products. The fact that you can build an audience and build a following is a strong demonstration of your marketing abilities and it will translate into so many areas in your career.

Time Management/Operations: Another great skill that running a blog teaches you is time management. I recently wrote a post called how to write a blog post in 20 minutes or less. Time management, efficiency and operations are going to be essential skills as your blog grows or your climb the ladder in the corporate world. Leaders are extremely proficient with time management and little time goes to waste.

Creativity: This is one of my personal favorite aspects of blogging. Creativity is really something you can’t put a price on. Too often in a typical corporate job, things become so routine that you don’t get a chance to think outside of the box. When you run a blog you are constantly being forced to come up with new ideas. This keeps the creative part of your brain going. That is why it doesn’t surprise me anymore that people figure out a way to get to what they want after the first year of blogging.

Strategic Planning/Decision Making: At the end of the day, you get to play CEO when you are a blogger. It’s your job to come up with strategic plans and make decisions. Again, this is a skill that will be essential in the working world.

Finance: Once you start making money off your blog and it truly does become a business, you are now the CEO and CFO of your blog. It’s likely you will keep financial records and keep track of everything you do. Pat Flynn from Smart Passive income does  a great job of this in his monthly income report.

Networking: It’s known fact the network you have is tremendously powerful. You are as powerful as the people you surround yourself with. Fortunately blogging gives you an opportunity to surround yourself with some really smart people who can teach you quite a bit.

At the end of the day, even if you don’t have any desire to become  a digital nomad or entrepreneur, starting a blog allows you to develop a wide set of essential business and career skills. So, START YOUR BLOG TODAY.

What has managing a blog taught you? What lessons have you been able to put into action in your professional lives?

Join the conversation! 80 Comments

  1. Srinivas! Killer post my man. I especially liked the leadership part. So often we think that blogging is all about us but in reality it takes a lot of balls and leadership to get to where we want to go.

    I’ve really enjoyed seeing you blossom in the blogging world dude.

    Reply
    • Leadership is a big part of this – and something that we don’t often think about or are hesitant to label ourselves as (leaders). But through managing our own communities and the people involved, we do become leaders and learn effective management skills along the way. Thanks for the comment Bud!

      Reply
      • @Bud: It’s been a pretty interesting journey for me. I’ve found that many of the skills I’ve developed have been instrumental in how they translate in the working world. In my day job I’m taking many of the skills I’ve acquired due to blogging and applying them.

        Reply
        • Yes, that’s a great point. You can find yourself in a position of actually knowing a lot more about some things then anyone else at your work.
          This has happened to me with internet marketing and creating a whole new development strategy for a company I was working for. It was pretty hilarious when I realized what I was able to do and how that must have looked to people who thought they new a lot about it.

          Reply
  2. Srinivas! Killer post my man. I especially liked the leadership part. So often we think that blogging is all about us but in reality it takes a lot of balls and leadership to get to where we want to go.

    I’ve really enjoyed seeing you blossom in the blogging world dude.

    Reply
    • Leadership is a big part of this – and something that we don’t often think about or are hesitant to label ourselves as (leaders). But through managing our own communities and the people involved, we do become leaders and learn effective management skills along the way. Thanks for the comment Bud!

      Reply
      • @Bud: It’s been a pretty interesting journey for me. I’ve found that many of the skills I’ve developed have been instrumental in how they translate in the working world. In my day job I’m taking many of the skills I’ve acquired due to blogging and applying them.

        Reply
        • Yes, that’s a great point. You can find yourself in a position of actually knowing a lot more about some things then anyone else at your work.
          This has happened to me with internet marketing and creating a whole new development strategy for a company I was working for. It was pretty hilarious when I realized what I was able to do and how that must have looked to people who thought they new a lot about it.

          Reply
  3. Great post Srinivas.

    Blogging has taught me so much, I think for me being consistent is one big skill I have learnt from blogging. Also as you mention, leadership and being the one that makes all the decisions is another that I have really noticed for myself as well as learning to trust myself and do what I feel is right.

    Jen

    Reply
    • As a blogger, you learn very early on that consistency is key – and that to maintain consistency, you really have to be efficent with your time-management. It’s not easy working a full time job, supporting a family, having a social life, and maintaining a blog. Juggling a million different things while still bringing your best and staying consistent says a lot about what an individual would bring to the table in a professional environment.

      Reply
      • I think there is no doubt that it teaches you commitment and consistency. Without it your blog kind of flails and flounders. The people that get past the one year mark and are consistent about what they do tend to be the ones that make it.

        Reply
  4. Great post Srinivas.

    Blogging has taught me so much, I think for me being consistent is one big skill I have learnt from blogging. Also as you mention, leadership and being the one that makes all the decisions is another that I have really noticed for myself as well as learning to trust myself and do what I feel is right.

    Jen

    Reply
    • As a blogger, you learn very early on that consistency is key – and that to maintain consistency, you really have to be efficent with your time-management. It’s not easy working a full time job, supporting a family, having a social life, and maintaining a blog. Juggling a million different things while still bringing your best and staying consistent says a lot about what an individual would bring to the table in a professional environment.

      Reply
      • I think there is no doubt that it teaches you commitment and consistency. Without it your blog kind of flails and flounders. The people that get past the one year mark and are consistent about what they do tend to be the ones that make it.

        Reply
  5. I just closed my blog yesterday :) It’s still there and it will be for at least one year or so, but I closed it because it no longer had a purpose. Granted, I created it when I feared unemployment as to build a secondary income source, “just in case”. Working on it I learned a few skills that secured me a job and, to take a tip from Bud, it helped me to plug into my identity.

    Funny, isn’t it?

    Right now, I have new projects, which I’m supporting with blogs, yet not a blog as a project on itself.

    Reply
    • …and I think that’s perfectly fine Miguel. A blog can serve very different purposes at very different times. It’s not for everyone all the time – I know I preach that you should get out and start a blog, but I hope that folks take it within reason and think about what they want to get out of it before taking the plunge, even if it’s for nothing more than pure pleasure and love for writing.

      The purpose of my blog has changed drastically and swayed back and forth – from focusing on building this as a way to find a job when I was moving, to personal therapeutic release, to supplementing freelance work, and then back to doing it “for fun”. And through it all, I’ve loved every minute of it.

      Thanks for the comment my friend.

      Reply
  6. I just closed my blog yesterday :) It’s still there and it will be for at least one year or so, but I closed it because it no longer had a purpose. Granted, I created it when I feared unemployment as to build a secondary income source, “just in case”. Working on it I learned a few skills that secured me a job and, to take a tip from Bud, it helped me to plug into my identity.

    Funny, isn’t it?

    Right now, I have new projects, which I’m supporting with blogs, yet not a blog as a project on itself.

    Reply
    • …and I think that’s perfectly fine Miguel. A blog can serve very different purposes at very different times. It’s not for everyone all the time – I know I preach that you should get out and start a blog, but I hope that folks take it within reason and think about what they want to get out of it before taking the plunge, even if it’s for nothing more than pure pleasure and love for writing.

      The purpose of my blog has changed drastically and swayed back and forth – from focusing on building this as a way to find a job when I was moving, to personal therapeutic release, to supplementing freelance work, and then back to doing it “for fun”. And through it all, I’ve loved every minute of it.

      Thanks for the comment my friend.

      Reply
  7. Hi Srinivas (and Matt),

    Great post! As someone who just started a blog, I have to say that some of the stuff you mentioned there sounds like a pipe dream. Like, it’s hard to imagine now that anyone would ever want to swap guest posts with me. Or that my site would ever be able to provide some income. I mean, I have plans for stuff like that, and I know it has been done, but sometimes it just seems like it’s too good to be true. Hearing this kind of advice from people who are living it really helps, though.

    So…thanks!

    All the best,

    Heather

    Reply
    • First of all – for the record – I’d be happy to do a blog swap with you – it looks like we have (very) different topics, but that’s what’s great about finding new blogs outside your niche. If you’re interested, feel free to email me – matt@mattchevy.com – and we can chat.

      I’m not a big proponent of a blog earning you income itself (through ad’s, etc). But, I can look no further than myself to see that it can become a platform for MANY opportunities, both personally and professionally, IF that’s what you want to get out of it eventually. (Would be more than happy to chat about this as well).

      In conclusion, I think we should set up a time to Skype and talk some of this stuff out…Let me know (and thanks for the comment).

      Reply
      • Emailed! Thanks a lot!

        HP

        Reply
      • That’s a good point. I started my blog for a certain purpose, but overtime it completely changed and I’ve received opportunities that were completely in the dark from me before I started. It really opens up lots of opportunity for a person and helps him develop. I’ve been following Srini’s blog for some time now and you can easily see how his blog has been changing the course of his life in a great way.

        Reply
        • Yes – you really evolve WITH your blog – and that’s what makes it so exciting for both you AND your readers. Don’t be afraid of change when it comes to your blog’s focus – it can and will change – it’s those who don’t pigeon-hole themselves and “roll with the punches” who really see the greatest long-term success.

          Reply
  8. Hi Srinivas (and Matt),

    Great post! As someone who just started a blog, I have to say that some of the stuff you mentioned there sounds like a pipe dream. Like, it’s hard to imagine now that anyone would ever want to swap guest posts with me. Or that my site would ever be able to provide some income. I mean, I have plans for stuff like that, and I know it has been done, but sometimes it just seems like it’s too good to be true. Hearing this kind of advice from people who are living it really helps, though.

    So…thanks!

    All the best,

    Heather

    Reply
    • First of all – for the record – I’d be happy to do a blog swap with you – it looks like we have (very) different topics, but that’s what’s great about finding new blogs outside your niche. If you’re interested, feel free to email me – matt@mattchevy.com – and we can chat.

      I’m not a big proponent of a blog earning you income itself (through ad’s, etc). But, I can look no further than myself to see that it can become a platform for MANY opportunities, both personally and professionally, IF that’s what you want to get out of it eventually. (Would be more than happy to chat about this as well).

      In conclusion, I think we should set up a time to Skype and talk some of this stuff out…Let me know (and thanks for the comment).

      Reply
      • Emailed! Thanks a lot!

        HP

        Reply
      • That’s a good point. I started my blog for a certain purpose, but overtime it completely changed and I’ve received opportunities that were completely in the dark from me before I started. It really opens up lots of opportunity for a person and helps him develop. I’ve been following Srini’s blog for some time now and you can easily see how his blog has been changing the course of his life in a great way.

        Reply
        • Yes – you really evolve WITH your blog – and that’s what makes it so exciting for both you AND your readers. Don’t be afraid of change when it comes to your blog’s focus – it can and will change – it’s those who don’t pigeon-hole themselves and “roll with the punches” who really see the greatest long-term success.

          Reply
  9. Loved this aspect. Too often, people regard bloggers as people with a lot of free time who get online to write about what they had for breakfast. This kills me! As we all know here, that’s so not the case. But this post, however, did a great job in summing up why. Awesome job.

    Reply
    • Ah yes…explaining what “we” do to the outside world is always fun, isn’t it? My entire family still doesn’t really “get it”, hell, my fiance is just now beginning to come around :) But then again, it’s extremely nice to have people who are much more disconnected than you and I to pull us away from the blog posts and twitter-feeds. But you are very right, a blog (while it can be about the meals you ate yesterday), can be and IS so much more than that. You literally hold the keys to taking it wherever you want to go.

      Reply
  10. Loved this aspect. Too often, people regard bloggers as people with a lot of free time who get online to write about what they had for breakfast. This kills me! As we all know here, that’s so not the case. But this post, however, did a great job in summing up why. Awesome job.

    Reply
    • Ah yes…explaining what “we” do to the outside world is always fun, isn’t it? My entire family still doesn’t really “get it”, hell, my fiance is just now beginning to come around :) But then again, it’s extremely nice to have people who are much more disconnected than you and I to pull us away from the blog posts and twitter-feeds. But you are very right, a blog (while it can be about the meals you ate yesterday), can be and IS so much more than that. You literally hold the keys to taking it wherever you want to go.

      Reply
  11. Srinivas, I respect you a lot. With that said, I’m going to completely disagree with your post.

    Blogs do not develop leadership: Even if your example of a guest post, you’re never really leading people through a blog. The blog is a one-man (or woman) solo mission to write good content and develop a following. There’s a HUGE difference between leading a team and building a following through excellent and meaningful writing.

    When you get a guest post, you’re pretty much giving another blogger certain specifications like due date, word count, and access to your blog. I guess leadership can be subjective, but I really don’t see this as the ability to lead a team.

    Blogs do not develop teamwork: Blogs actually develop an entirely different sill set: the ability to work alone, the ability to brand yourself, that ability to market yourself, the ability to express oneself through words.

    Retweets and guest blog posts don’t necessarily mean teamwork for me. A retweet is just an acknowledgment of good content; a guest blog post is just some other blogger trying to promote himself on your blog.

    I’m not saying that team work never happens. Just take a look at what we’ve done with Untemplater; however, the skills I learned with blogging DID NOT prepare me to work in a team and lead the team. The skills I learned through the corporate world and starting my own company (Viralogy) helped me assemble and lead the Untemplater team.

    Marketing: I completely disagree with this phrase, “If you can market yourself with little to no resources then you can easily go into a company that gives you a budget and market their products.”

    First of all, marketing yourself is completely different from marketing a company. Just because you can retweet a post or get someone to fan you on Facebook, it does NOT follow that you have learned anything about marketing a big brand company.

    Second of all, managing a budget is much more difficult that managing no budget. How are you going to measure ROI? What forms of paid-advertising are you going to use? Blogging teaches none of this.

    Finance: To a certain extent, handling your own cash flow teaches you a lot of things. However, it will not prepare you in any way to become the CFO of a company or to do your own taxes.

    I love the people I’ve met in the blogosphere. At the same time, I’m so over blogging about blogging and getting everyone I meet to start a blog. I did this for a very long time and have now realized that blogging is NOT for everyone.

    Don’t get me wrong, blogging does build great skills; however, it by no means builds skills that will help you in careers beyond social media or blogging.

    Hope to hear your rebuttal.

    - Jun

    Reply
    • I agree with Jun on this one. I’m also done with the “blogging about blogging about starting your own blog blogging about the coolness of blogging”. And I also don’t agree with your ideas here, Srinivas. They’re very general (which sells, of course), and that’s the type of content that usually appears here.

      Blogs are a very specific tool that works for certain industries and people more than others. Blogs are not the second coming of Christ nor are they the tool that will save your ass. They’re just a tool.

      No, everybody should NOT start a blog.

      A philips screwdriver is an amazing tool that works just about everywhere – except when you’re trying to unscrew a flathead screw. I could tell you all day how awesome the philips screwdriver is and the amazing abilities it has. But you still won’t be able to unscrew the flathead screw with it.

      Reply
    • Jun,

      I’m glad to see an opposing viewpoint because it’s something I don’t see enough of in many blogs. So, I’m more than happy to give you a rebuttal on my thoughts. First and foremost I think making absolute statements is a bit extreme. I think everybody gains different benefits from blogging. We each take away something different from the experience. I can honestly all the things I’ve mentioned here are skills that running a blog has helped me to enhance. No doubt, finishing an MBA also helped develop many of those skills. Now let’s get to the specifics:

      Leadership: Maybe you are not directly leading people, but I think process of organizing people together and getting them to collaborate with you on projects actually results in the development of leadership skills.

      Teamwork: I’ve been part of 2 multi-author launches. One was a flop. The other BlogcastFM is doing quite well. You took the skills you’ve gained from Viralogy as a leader and applied those in your untemplater launch. For me the skills, Ive gained from running my personal blog played an integral role in launching BlogcastFM and partnering with somebody. I also think that tons of people collaborate on projects and their blogs provide the platform for collaboration. There are tons of e-books that are a joint effort and I believe teamwork comes into play in those cases. Again it comes down to perspective.

      Marketing: I think you bring up a pretty fair and valid point on this one. I probably could have done a better job on expanding on this concept. I”m currently working in a marketing role and there’s no doubt in my mind that my blog had a huge impact on me getting hired. That being said you’re points are fair here. AS a blogger you don’t have the pressure of budgets and ROI. So it might not teach you how to be a CPG marketer for a huge brand, but I think it provides a great outlet for creative marketing ideas that you can take into the workplace.

      Finance: I would definitely agree that it’s not going prepare you to be a CFO. But as your blog evolves from a blog to a real business you and you generate revenue, I think you do end up getting exposed to managing cash flows and thinking about things from a financial perspective.

      Sure it’s probably not for every one. But I think there are many intrinsic benefits that people can gain from blogging. I think it’s a great personal development and the growth in your career regardless of whether you work in social media or not is a byproduct for many people.

      Again, I”m glad to see an opposing viewpoint since it gives us alot think about and more opportunity to learn

      Reply
      • “Sure it’s probably not for every one.”

        That’s the key right there, that we all need to acknowledge. Blogging isn’t the catch all savior here – it’s just another tool.

        Reply
        • I think everyone here has acknowledged that, Tim. But personally, I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am today if I hadn’t decided to start a blog 13 months ago. It’s a tool, yes, but I agree with Srvinias that regardless of background, industry, or goal, it’s a tool that can pave the way for amazing opportunity.

          Reply
  12. Srinivas, I respect you a lot. With that said, I’m going to completely disagree with your post.

    Blogs do not develop leadership: Even if your example of a guest post, you’re never really leading people through a blog. The blog is a one-man (or woman) solo mission to write good content and develop a following. There’s a HUGE difference between leading a team and building a following through excellent and meaningful writing.

    When you get a guest post, you’re pretty much giving another blogger certain specifications like due date, word count, and access to your blog. I guess leadership can be subjective, but I really don’t see this as the ability to lead a team.

    Blogs do not develop teamwork: Blogs actually develop an entirely different sill set: the ability to work alone, the ability to brand yourself, that ability to market yourself, the ability to express oneself through words.

    Retweets and guest blog posts don’t necessarily mean teamwork for me. A retweet is just an acknowledgment of good content; a guest blog post is just some other blogger trying to promote himself on your blog.

    I’m not saying that team work never happens. Just take a look at what we’ve done with Untemplater; however, the skills I learned with blogging DID NOT prepare me to work in a team and lead the team. The skills I learned through the corporate world and starting my own company (Viralogy) helped me assemble and lead the Untemplater team.

    Marketing: I completely disagree with this phrase, “If you can market yourself with little to no resources then you can easily go into a company that gives you a budget and market their products.”

    First of all, marketing yourself is completely different from marketing a company. Just because you can retweet a post or get someone to fan you on Facebook, it does NOT follow that you have learned anything about marketing a big brand company.

    Second of all, managing a budget is much more difficult that managing no budget. How are you going to measure ROI? What forms of paid-advertising are you going to use? Blogging teaches none of this.

    Finance: To a certain extent, handling your own cash flow teaches you a lot of things. However, it will not prepare you in any way to become the CFO of a company or to do your own taxes.

    I love the people I’ve met in the blogosphere. At the same time, I’m so over blogging about blogging and getting everyone I meet to start a blog. I did this for a very long time and have now realized that blogging is NOT for everyone.

    Don’t get me wrong, blogging does build great skills; however, it by no means builds skills that will help you in careers beyond social media or blogging.

    Hope to hear your rebuttal.

    - Jun

    Reply
    • I agree with Jun on this one. I’m also done with the “blogging about blogging about starting your own blog blogging about the coolness of blogging”. And I also don’t agree with your ideas here, Srinivas. They’re very general (which sells, of course), and that’s the type of content that usually appears here.

      Blogs are a very specific tool that works for certain industries and people more than others. Blogs are not the second coming of Christ nor are they the tool that will save your ass. They’re just a tool.

      No, everybody should NOT start a blog.

      A philips screwdriver is an amazing tool that works just about everywhere – except when you’re trying to unscrew a flathead screw. I could tell you all day how awesome the philips screwdriver is and the amazing abilities it has. But you still won’t be able to unscrew the flathead screw with it.

      Reply
    • Jun,

      I’m glad to see an opposing viewpoint because it’s something I don’t see enough of in many blogs. So, I’m more than happy to give you a rebuttal on my thoughts. First and foremost I think making absolute statements is a bit extreme. I think everybody gains different benefits from blogging. We each take away something different from the experience. I can honestly all the things I’ve mentioned here are skills that running a blog has helped me to enhance. No doubt, finishing an MBA also helped develop many of those skills. Now let’s get to the specifics:

      Leadership: Maybe you are not directly leading people, but I think process of organizing people together and getting them to collaborate with you on projects actually results in the development of leadership skills.

      Teamwork: I’ve been part of 2 multi-author launches. One was a flop. The other BlogcastFM is doing quite well. You took the skills you’ve gained from Viralogy as a leader and applied those in your untemplater launch. For me the skills, Ive gained from running my personal blog played an integral role in launching BlogcastFM and partnering with somebody. I also think that tons of people collaborate on projects and their blogs provide the platform for collaboration. There are tons of e-books that are a joint effort and I believe teamwork comes into play in those cases. Again it comes down to perspective.

      Marketing: I think you bring up a pretty fair and valid point on this one. I probably could have done a better job on expanding on this concept. I”m currently working in a marketing role and there’s no doubt in my mind that my blog had a huge impact on me getting hired. That being said you’re points are fair here. AS a blogger you don’t have the pressure of budgets and ROI. So it might not teach you how to be a CPG marketer for a huge brand, but I think it provides a great outlet for creative marketing ideas that you can take into the workplace.

      Finance: I would definitely agree that it’s not going prepare you to be a CFO. But as your blog evolves from a blog to a real business you and you generate revenue, I think you do end up getting exposed to managing cash flows and thinking about things from a financial perspective.

      Sure it’s probably not for every one. But I think there are many intrinsic benefits that people can gain from blogging. I think it’s a great personal development and the growth in your career regardless of whether you work in social media or not is a byproduct for many people.

      Again, I”m glad to see an opposing viewpoint since it gives us alot think about and more opportunity to learn

      Reply
      • “Sure it’s probably not for every one.”

        That’s the key right there, that we all need to acknowledge. Blogging isn’t the catch all savior here – it’s just another tool.

        Reply
        • I think everyone here has acknowledged that, Tim. But personally, I wouldn’t be anywhere near where I am today if I hadn’t decided to start a blog 13 months ago. It’s a tool, yes, but I agree with Srvinias that regardless of background, industry, or goal, it’s a tool that can pave the way for amazing opportunity.

          Reply
  13. Great post! You’re totally right – I only wish I could use my blog on my resume to back up those claims :)

    Reply
    • Why can’t you? I think you totally can if it makes sense (obviously depends on the job you apply for). But, when I was moving to Chicago, my blog and the community I’d built here was one of the main things I pointed back to when it came to the knowledge they were looking for in this field. There is a lot you can speak on and apply from what goes on here to a professional environment.

      Obviously, “experience” in the true sense of the word is going to mean more, but don’t hesitate to “pimp your blog” if it makes sense to when looking for work…

      Reply
    • I’m with Matt – the only way to substantiate blogs as a real viable tool (that can be used for something other than complaining about politics and the like) is to do what you’re suggesting – put your blog on your resume.

      Bring your blog up in regular situations – with job employers, with family, etc. The only way people are going to take this sort of new media seriously is if they realize the value of it.

      Reply
  14. Great post! You’re totally right – I only wish I could use my blog on my resume to back up those claims :)

    Reply
    • Why can’t you? I think you totally can if it makes sense (obviously depends on the job you apply for). But, when I was moving to Chicago, my blog and the community I’d built here was one of the main things I pointed back to when it came to the knowledge they were looking for in this field. There is a lot you can speak on and apply from what goes on here to a professional environment.

      Obviously, “experience” in the true sense of the word is going to mean more, but don’t hesitate to “pimp your blog” if it makes sense to when looking for work…

      Reply
    • I’m with Matt – the only way to substantiate blogs as a real viable tool (that can be used for something other than complaining about politics and the like) is to do what you’re suggesting – put your blog on your resume.

      Bring your blog up in regular situations – with job employers, with family, etc. The only way people are going to take this sort of new media seriously is if they realize the value of it.

      Reply
  15. I agree and disagree it all comes back to the person, most people who start a blog abandon it after a few months when the “wow” factor wears off. ( at the moment I am seven months in will let you know what happens at the year mark)

    A person who is driven and has passion for what he does and writes about in the blog will develop these skills. If he is slacker, he will bring his slackerness to his blog. Our habits define us whether we want to accept that fact or not.

    Passion is the fuel that makes a person who lacks leadership skills develop them or go find someone who has them. The fact of writing a blog will not give everyone that skill, if is like the old adage all German Shepherds are dogs but all dogs are not German Shepherds . ( got that for my grandfather)

    Hence everyone can blog but everyone is not going to be a great blogger and only the great bloggers are going to learn all of that stuff if they did not know it beforehand.

    Reply
    • Great point, Glendon. It’s important to separate the person from the tool, because as you said, every person will use a blog differently with a different level of passion and motivation.

      Reply
      • In my very short tenure as a blogger, I have noticed the 80/20 rule rearing its head. I keep seeing the same names over and over again when it comes to blogging. For that group this post applies for the rest of us it is a wait and see deal. Yes , you got to look at the person versus the tool, it is critical.

        I just really started researching and reading other blogs. I am a capitalist so my goal was to make money with my blog, it really was just to be a marketing piece for my book…but it is turning into a lot more.

        Whether it is blogging , academics or whatever, the creme rises to the top, I think that blogging gives everyone the opportunity for expression, but so does the First Amendment and precious few take advantage of that right as a citizen.

        Reply
        • Very important to separate and define the person and the tool – But while ultimately the person is what truly “defines” greatness – experiencing what I have experienced will ensure that I never discount the blogging as a tool for great opportunities, a platform that can substantially build a thriving community of communication, a way for us to truly build connections and friendships, and a indirect/direct tie-in with my professional work. I know I’m an ambitious guy and I spend (probably way more time than I should) nurturing this community – but the return on investment of using this “tool” so significantly has truly “paid” dividends. The ROI speaks for itself.

          Thanks for the comment Glendon.

          Reply
  16. I agree and disagree it all comes back to the person, most people who start a blog abandon it after a few months when the “wow” factor wears off. ( at the moment I am seven months in will let you know what happens at the year mark)

    A person who is driven and has passion for what he does and writes about in the blog will develop these skills. If he is slacker, he will bring his slackerness to his blog. Our habits define us whether we want to accept that fact or not.

    Passion is the fuel that makes a person who lacks leadership skills develop them or go find someone who has them. The fact of writing a blog will not give everyone that skill, if is like the old adage all German Shepherds are dogs but all dogs are not German Shepherds . ( got that for my grandfather)

    Hence everyone can blog but everyone is not going to be a great blogger and only the great bloggers are going to learn all of that stuff if they did not know it beforehand.

    Reply
    • Great point, Glendon. It’s important to separate the person from the tool, because as you said, every person will use a blog differently with a different level of passion and motivation.

      Reply
      • In my very short tenure as a blogger, I have noticed the 80/20 rule rearing its head. I keep seeing the same names over and over again when it comes to blogging. For that group this post applies for the rest of us it is a wait and see deal. Yes , you got to look at the person versus the tool, it is critical.

        I just really started researching and reading other blogs. I am a capitalist so my goal was to make money with my blog, it really was just to be a marketing piece for my book…but it is turning into a lot more.

        Whether it is blogging , academics or whatever, the creme rises to the top, I think that blogging gives everyone the opportunity for expression, but so does the First Amendment and precious few take advantage of that right as a citizen.

        Reply
        • Very important to separate and define the person and the tool – But while ultimately the person is what truly “defines” greatness – experiencing what I have experienced will ensure that I never discount the blogging as a tool for great opportunities, a platform that can substantially build a thriving community of communication, a way for us to truly build connections and friendships, and a indirect/direct tie-in with my professional work. I know I’m an ambitious guy and I spend (probably way more time than I should) nurturing this community – but the return on investment of using this “tool” so significantly has truly “paid” dividends. The ROI speaks for itself.

          Thanks for the comment Glendon.

          Reply
  17. Hi Srinivas, I like the how came up with what kind of business and career skills we can obtain from blogging. What I have learned with blogging is that you have to be patient. Sometimes it’s hard starting out, and it can also be overwhelming with hundreds of other blogs out there. But we have to have faith that our blog will one day grow to be seen, without feeling the need to rush the process. It’s like planting a seed into the ground and waiting for it to sprout one day. I think this can be applied to real life also. Having patience, taking it step-by-step, and having faith in yourself and in your business or career is key to making it grow into a successful business.

    Reply
    • Patience is the number one thing Hulbert – above all. The reason so many people don’t keep their blog going – the reason so many businesses are reluctant to jump on the Social Media bandwagon? They don’t have the patience for it – they don’t accept that building a community takes time, real time…

      And why is that? Because building a community involves people – other living breathing human beings. And when you’re talking about people you’re talking about earning their trust, gaining their respect – all of that has to be taken into consideration. You’re not going to have 1,000 + subscribers in a month, you’re not going to be having conversations like this from day one – but in time, in the illustrious words of James Earl Jones, “If you build it, they will come”…

      Reply
  18. Hi Srinivas, I like the how came up with what kind of business and career skills we can obtain from blogging. What I have learned with blogging is that you have to be patient. Sometimes it’s hard starting out, and it can also be overwhelming with hundreds of other blogs out there. But we have to have faith that our blog will one day grow to be seen, without feeling the need to rush the process. It’s like planting a seed into the ground and waiting for it to sprout one day. I think this can be applied to real life also. Having patience, taking it step-by-step, and having faith in yourself and in your business or career is key to making it grow into a successful business.

    Reply
    • Patience is the number one thing Hulbert – above all. The reason so many people don’t keep their blog going – the reason so many businesses are reluctant to jump on the Social Media bandwagon? They don’t have the patience for it – they don’t accept that building a community takes time, real time…

      And why is that? Because building a community involves people – other living breathing human beings. And when you’re talking about people you’re talking about earning their trust, gaining their respect – all of that has to be taken into consideration. You’re not going to have 1,000 + subscribers in a month, you’re not going to be having conversations like this from day one – but in time, in the illustrious words of James Earl Jones, “If you build it, they will come”…

      Reply
  19. Such a good post, I had to share it with my readers!

    Reply
  20. Such a good post, I had to share it with my readers!

    Reply
  21. I love this post. I have been trying to get all of my friends to start “real blogs” (not the kind where you just post pictures of your latest vacation).

    I would have to say that I agree with Tim that it doesn’t necessarily “work” for everyone BUT working on a blog regularly improves so many critical skills mentioned in the post.

    The thing that I appreciate the most is how blogging has opened up my mind. I have so many more ideas and inspired thoughts because I’m always trying to think of things to blog about. This active mindset has opened up so many opportunities for me to share what I am passionate about.

    Reply
    • You’re right – it doesn’t work for everyone, it’s not for everyone – it all depends on what your specific goals are – at the end of the day it’s a tool – albeit a pretty powerful one…

      I completely agree about your point of “opening your mind” – the blogging world continues to enhance my perspective on everything – the greatest return on investment is the learning that happens every single day.

      Reply
    • I think you are def right. It’s not for everyone. It takes a certain type of person to get the most out of it. But I will say this. I do believe that everyone can use it as a personal development tool. Even if they use a simple blogspot blog, imagine going through the exercise in a Tony Robbins course and using a blog as a way of documenting it. I think it was in Personal Power II where he said “I life worth living is a life worth recording.” Something to think about even if you are not using a blog from a business/career standpoint.

      Reply
  22. I love this post. I have been trying to get all of my friends to start “real blogs” (not the kind where you just post pictures of your latest vacation).

    I would have to say that I agree with Tim that it doesn’t necessarily “work” for everyone BUT working on a blog regularly improves so many critical skills mentioned in the post.

    The thing that I appreciate the most is how blogging has opened up my mind. I have so many more ideas and inspired thoughts because I’m always trying to think of things to blog about. This active mindset has opened up so many opportunities for me to share what I am passionate about.

    Reply
    • You’re right – it doesn’t work for everyone, it’s not for everyone – it all depends on what your specific goals are – at the end of the day it’s a tool – albeit a pretty powerful one…

      I completely agree about your point of “opening your mind” – the blogging world continues to enhance my perspective on everything – the greatest return on investment is the learning that happens every single day.

      Reply
    • I think you are def right. It’s not for everyone. It takes a certain type of person to get the most out of it. But I will say this. I do believe that everyone can use it as a personal development tool. Even if they use a simple blogspot blog, imagine going through the exercise in a Tony Robbins course and using a blog as a way of documenting it. I think it was in Personal Power II where he said “I life worth living is a life worth recording.” Something to think about even if you are not using a blog from a business/career standpoint.

      Reply
  23. Always love you pantless work my friend. Please tell me you actually write your article without trousers on…if not, just lie to me….don’t kill the dream.

    Reply
  24. Always love you pantless work my friend. Please tell me you actually write your article without trousers on…if not, just lie to me….don’t kill the dream.

    Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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