What is Your Greatest Accomplishment?

You probably stumbled across this post because you’re seeking the answer to one simple, yet incredibly complex question: “What is your greatest accomplishment”? If you enjoy the post that follows, I strongly encourage you to download a copy of my ebook “Welcome to the Real World”, featuring insight and wisdom from 50 of the most inspirational and driven folks you’ll meet. Click here to grab your copy.

“To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

Show of hands, how many of you out there have been sitting in an interview, going through the ringer of questions, when this one pops up and totally throws you for a loop: “What is your greatest accomplishment?” Welcome to the real world…

Talk about a loaded question. Think right now, does something immediately come to mind? Maybe, but odds are you’ve got a million thoughts spinning around up there. A few weeks ago I was asked this exact question during an interview - it was a question that for some reason, I was totally unprepared for. We had already been through the personal ‘SWOT’ analysis – breaking down my strengths and weaknesses, we’d discussed times of overwhelming stress and challenge (and how I dealt with it). I knew the drill, most interviews are pretty cut and dry, but this one had me stumped.

I sat there for a minute, looking down at a copy of my resume, hoping the answer would jump up at me. Nothing. I started to think about everything. Yes, EVERYTHING that I had been through in my life. Growing up, moving around a lot, my parents divorce, going through school, finishing high school, making and losing friends, that one trip to Washington in 8th grade, graduating college, the one episode of Saved by the Bell where Zack and the gang camps out at the mall for U2 tickets, looking for jobs, getting engaged – a lifetime of memories laid out in front of me, swirling around in approximately 3.5 seconds of thought.

It’s safe to say there’s a lot there for all of us – so much so that it’s almost impossible to pinpoint one event from our past that can be considered the definitive ‘greatest accomplishment’. All I could think of was that at 23 years old there’s no way I’ve even really begun to achieve greatness – that my greatest accomplishment (so far) is simply living and working toward writing my life’s legacy. That there’s been no happy ending, that I’ve only written the prologue.

What is Your Greatest Accomplishment?

A couple weeks ago I reached out to all of you fine Twitter followers and asked you to take a minute and put your life under the microscope. To define, in 140 characters or less, what you considered to be your greatest accomplishment. The response was overwhelming and what I surmised from my ‘research’ was the synonymous idea of accomplishment with self discovery, selflessness, and humility.

Collectively, we’re proud of not only what we’ve been able to do for ourselves, but of what we’ve done for our friends, neighbors, and complete strangers.

So before I share MY actual response – the answer I gave that may not have landed me the job, but should have at least warranted a ‘slow clap’ – I want to share the insightful (and inspiring) things you all had to say. Your responses were both humbling and inspiring. As you read through these below, think about what your own response would be. What is your greatest accomplishment? What contributions have you made to the world around you?

What Is Your Greatest Accomplishment? (In 140 characters or less)

What is Your Greatest Accomplishment? (In 140 characters or less)What Is Your Greatest Accomplishment? (In 140 characters or less)

Whether your greatest accomplishment is finishing college or raising your kids, surpassing the legacy of generations before you or volunteering your time for the less fortunate. We all have something (many things) to be proud of. We all have a story to tell. Every one of these responses serve as reaffirmation that we are all inherently good people. People that strive to do more and be more for ourselves and for our communities.

But keep this in mind: Your greatest accomplishment isn’t set in stone – your past doesn’t define your future. The future is out there for you to conquer – the road ahead is wide open and you’re in the drivers seat. When you think about your greatest accomplishments,  think about where you are today, think about being alive, think about all the good in your life and the good you can bring to the world around you.

…by now the silence had achieved ‘awkward status’. It had been a good 30 seconds since my interviewer had dropped this bomb on me…“What is your greatest accomplishment?”

I had to come up with something. I looked up, cleared my throat, and summarized it all in one word: “This”

This response warranted little more than a blank stare from across the desk, so I quickly continued on…“This is my greatest accomplishment, being here, interviewing with you, having this opportunity. My greatest accomplishment isn’t in the past, it’s the present, this moment, the ‘right now’. I’m living my greatest accomplishment every minute of every hour of every day.”

Call it cheesy. Call it cliche. But today is your best today. Today is the new tomorrow. Your greatest accomplishment is everything you’ve done that’s helped you to arrive at the moment we call now.

What is YOUR greatest accomplishment? Is there one monumental event that stands out? Have you been asked this question before? What response do you give?

Are you going through a job hunt? Check out my Welcome to the Real World ebook with wisdom and advice for new grads, job-seekers, and yeah, pretty much anyone else. Click here to grab your copy.


62 Responses
  • Pritesh Reply

    Matt:

    Thanks for featuring my Twit here. It’s good to see other replies as well.

    After looking at them, few things are easily noticeable. Almost no one has said to have x amount of dollars, or a car or any material things as their accomplishments. Even though we deny, we all love these material things. The power of media is so high that you can not just ignore them. And still, no one thinks them as their greatest accomplishments (yet).

    There could be many reasons to that. May be your audience is in their younger age and they still have to achieve material things OR they simply don’t care about them. They might have educated themselves from various blogs, friends and social media networks that material things don’t matter in their lives that much. This is what I call a ‘change’. A change which goes above our own identity. It’s our joint effort to help each other and lead everyone in our circle towards success and good life. And I would consider this achievement as our joint accomplishment.

    Matt- I have a thought for you. It would be great to run the same series after a year and see the differences in our greatest accomplishments. May be it’s the same or may be all together, it’s different. But it would be good to see how our views towards life and accomplishments have changed with the time.

    Cheers..
    Pritesh
    http://twitter.com/mehta1p

    • Matt Reply

      I won’t deny that material things are important. I want enough money to life comfortably, start my own business someday, to retire fairly early, travel the world, you name it. Money and material things make life ‘easier’ – no one can deny that. But with that being said, it’s not, by any means, the desire for money isn’t what drives me, and it will never make me feel ‘complete’. Making a good amount of money is a result of hard-work, which is an accomplishment worth noting, but it’s clear to me that collectively, we are all striving for much more than having a lot of material things, and what surprises me is the unanimous selfless spirit that is apparent in the responses above.

      I’m happy to re-address this topic somewhere down the line – our perspective on life is ever-changing, and if we go by my creed of ‘living your accomplishments every day’ it would be interesting to see where everyone is at a year, five years, ten years down the line.

      Thanks (as always) for coming by Pritesh!

      • Chelsie Reply

        Another 2 cents:

        On materialism, I think the perceived lack in valuing “stuff” can only be a good thing. Money, the next cultural sensation–all these are temporary. Perhaps our generation is learning that they can’t stake their worth in their pocketbooks or possessions; besides, we’re also learning how costly (time and money) it is to own and maintain all our stuff.

        Besides, trumpeting what you own or what you can buy doesn’t earn you respect…maybe jealousy, but not respect.

        • Matt Reply

          @Chelsie – You remain wise beyond your years. I think this idea (again) ties into the concept of living in the now vs. looking at the big picture, but through a reverse lens. In this case, the now tells us that money is necessary, that I HAVE to buy a latte on the way to work, that I HAVE to buy a new car – whatever the case may be. Money, and spending it, is a very ‘now’ concept. But in the grand scheme of things, when you take a step back and think about what’s really important, and what contributes to your overall legacy and ‘accomplishment’ – it isn’t the monetary, it’s the intangible things you do throughout your life that define you.

          I like your closing point, and I completely agree – money might earn you envy and jealousy, but it will never earn you respect.

  • Pritesh Reply

    Matt:

    Thanks for featuring my Twit here. It’s good to see other replies as well.

    After looking at them, few things are easily noticeable. Almost no one has said to have x amount of dollars, or a car or any material things as their accomplishments. Even though we deny, we all love these material things. The power of media is so high that you can not just ignore them. And still, no one thinks them as their greatest accomplishments (yet).

    There could be many reasons to that. May be your audience is in their younger age and they still have to achieve material things OR they simply don’t care about them. They might have educated themselves from various blogs, friends and social media networks that material things don’t matter in their lives that much. This is what I call a ‘change’. A change which goes above our own identity. It’s our joint effort to help each other and lead everyone in our circle towards success and good life. And I would consider this achievement as our joint accomplishment.

    Matt- I have a thought for you. It would be great to run the same series after a year and see the differences in our greatest accomplishments. May be it’s the same or may be all together, it’s different. But it would be good to see how our views towards life and accomplishments have changed with the time.

    Cheers..
    Pritesh
    http://twitter.com/mehta1p

    • Matt Reply

      I won’t deny that material things are important. I want enough money to life comfortably, start my own business someday, to retire fairly early, travel the world, you name it. Money and material things make life ‘easier’ – no one can deny that. But with that being said, it’s not, by any means, the desire for money isn’t what drives me, and it will never make me feel ‘complete’. Making a good amount of money is a result of hard-work, which is an accomplishment worth noting, but it’s clear to me that collectively, we are all striving for much more than having a lot of material things, and what surprises me is the unanimous selfless spirit that is apparent in the responses above.

      I’m happy to re-address this topic somewhere down the line – our perspective on life is ever-changing, and if we go by my creed of ‘living your accomplishments every day’ it would be interesting to see where everyone is at a year, five years, ten years down the line.

      Thanks (as always) for coming by Pritesh!

      • Chelsie Reply

        Another 2 cents:

        On materialism, I think the perceived lack in valuing “stuff” can only be a good thing. Money, the next cultural sensation–all these are temporary. Perhaps our generation is learning that they can’t stake their worth in their pocketbooks or possessions; besides, we’re also learning how costly (time and money) it is to own and maintain all our stuff.

        Besides, trumpeting what you own or what you can buy doesn’t earn you respect…maybe jealousy, but not respect.

        • Matt Reply

          @Chelsie – You remain wise beyond your years. I think this idea (again) ties into the concept of living in the now vs. looking at the big picture, but through a reverse lens. In this case, the now tells us that money is necessary, that I HAVE to buy a latte on the way to work, that I HAVE to buy a new car – whatever the case may be. Money, and spending it, is a very ‘now’ concept. But in the grand scheme of things, when you take a step back and think about what’s really important, and what contributes to your overall legacy and ‘accomplishment’ – it isn’t the monetary, it’s the intangible things you do throughout your life that define you.

          I like your closing point, and I completely agree – money might earn you envy and jealousy, but it will never earn you respect.

  • Ryan Stephens Reply

    I’d say my greatest accomplishment is just being a role model for my little sister.

    I enjoyed reading this post, and love that a good percentage of people’s greatest accomplishments are things they’ve done for other people.

    I also like your approach Matt of really living in the moment. Reminds me a lot of Dan Millman’s “Peaceful Warrior.”

    R

    • Matt Reply

      @Ryan – I’m not familiar with ‘Peaceful Warrior’ but it sounds like something I need to be checking out. I’m glad you enjoyed the post – I was honestly surprised by the selflessness of the responses here. Our ‘greatest accomplishments’ aren’t self-centered; they’re about being our best selves for the benefit of the world around us. A hell of an accomplishment for anyone if you ask me.

      • Ryan Stephens Reply

        Admittedly the movie is pretty corny, but there’s some solid “in the moment” quotes worth checking out. You might opt for the book, but if you only have 2 hours try the trailer and see it’s something that might tickle your fancy –> http://is.gd/15rjB

    • Chelsie Reply

      Ryan- isn’t it compelling, being a role model? Seeing your life from others’ eyes, especially kids, gives new meaning to your actions, responses, and words.

      To quote “Peaceful Warrior”:

      Socrates: Where are you?
      Dan Millman: Here.

      Socrates: What time is it?
      Dan Millman: Now.

      Socrates: What are you?
      Dan Millman: This moment.

      Man. If we all live with that kind of focus, little is beyond our grasp.

      Matt- Brilliant response-and even better that it’s true. I can’t imagine anything more pleasing to an employer’s ear than the promise that his interviewee gives his moments undivided attention. Cheers!

      • Matt Reply

        @Chelsie – If ‘Peaceful Warrior’ has the Guillemet stamp of approval, I know it’s something I need to be reading! The quote you shared above encompasses my exact train of thought here. I struggle with living in the moment, I think we all do, but it’s something I strive for.

        Stop struggling with the past, stop worrying about the future, the only thing that is in your (my) control is the now and how I live this exact moment.

      • Ryan Stephens Reply

        Chelsie – I consistently refer to two quotes to keep me on the path I want to be on …

        1.) Steve Prefontaine’s “To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice you gift.”

        2.) The one you’ve quoted above. I love it!

        Thanks for helping me convince Matt it’s worth his busy schedule! :)

  • Ryan Stephens Reply

    I’d say my greatest accomplishment is just being a role model for my little sister.

    I enjoyed reading this post, and love that a good percentage of people’s greatest accomplishments are things they’ve done for other people.

    I also like your approach Matt of really living in the moment. Reminds me a lot of Dan Millman’s “Peaceful Warrior.”

    R

    • Matt Reply

      @Ryan – I’m not familiar with ‘Peaceful Warrior’ but it sounds like something I need to be checking out. I’m glad you enjoyed the post – I was honestly surprised by the selflessness of the responses here. Our ‘greatest accomplishments’ aren’t self-centered; they’re about being our best selves for the benefit of the world around us. A hell of an accomplishment for anyone if you ask me.

      • Ryan Stephens Reply

        Admittedly the movie is pretty corny, but there’s some solid “in the moment” quotes worth checking out. You might opt for the book, but if you only have 2 hours try the trailer and see it’s something that might tickle your fancy –> http://is.gd/15rjB

    • Chelsie Reply

      Ryan- isn’t it compelling, being a role model? Seeing your life from others’ eyes, especially kids, gives new meaning to your actions, responses, and words.

      To quote “Peaceful Warrior”:

      Socrates: Where are you?
      Dan Millman: Here.

      Socrates: What time is it?
      Dan Millman: Now.

      Socrates: What are you?
      Dan Millman: This moment.

      Man. If we all live with that kind of focus, little is beyond our grasp.

      Matt- Brilliant response-and even better that it’s true. I can’t imagine anything more pleasing to an employer’s ear than the promise that his interviewee gives his moments undivided attention. Cheers!

      • Matt Reply

        @Chelsie – If ‘Peaceful Warrior’ has the Guillemet stamp of approval, I know it’s something I need to be reading! The quote you shared above encompasses my exact train of thought here. I struggle with living in the moment, I think we all do, but it’s something I strive for.

        Stop struggling with the past, stop worrying about the future, the only thing that is in your (my) control is the now and how I live this exact moment.

      • Ryan Stephens Reply

        Chelsie – I consistently refer to two quotes to keep me on the path I want to be on …

        1.) Steve Prefontaine’s “To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice you gift.”

        2.) The one you’ve quoted above. I love it!

        Thanks for helping me convince Matt it’s worth his busy schedule! :)

  • Grace Reply

    Wow-what a question to be asked. I’ve heard that before.

    My answer I think may change with experience and I agree with what you said. Being here right now, where I am and succeeding at this moment. To me right now, my greatest accomplishment was hitting the restart button, moving to a place I really wanted to live in, packing up my car, no job, no apartment, knowing no one—and creating a life here. Working at a job I love, creating friends, and building something from the ground up. It makes me think I am capable of anything!

    This has prompted a lot of things from my mind, so I love it. Thanks for sharing and I hope you get that job :)

    • Matt Reply

      Well Grace, I actually didn’t get this job, so thank you very much for bringing up such a sensitive subject! (I kid, I kid). I really didn’t get this job, but between you-me, I think this was the type of company that wanted a more cut-and-dry ‘Graduating College is my biggest accomplishment’ type of answer, if you know what I mean. Let’s just say I know there’s something much better out there – and if I’m practicing what I preach, I know that everything is a learning experience. My chins’ held high.

      Your ‘restart button’ is exactly what I’m going through. It’s like looking at that big red button on the wall that says ‘DO NOT PUSH’ and then finally pushing it. There’s a lot up in the air, but I’m ready for the ‘next step’ – ready to accomplish new things and starting the next chapter of this thing we call life.

      Cheers to you Grace – I’m glad this has prompted some thought and inspiration for you.

  • Grace Reply

    Wow-what a question to be asked. I’ve heard that before.

    My answer I think may change with experience and I agree with what you said. Being here right now, where I am and succeeding at this moment. To me right now, my greatest accomplishment was hitting the restart button, moving to a place I really wanted to live in, packing up my car, no job, no apartment, knowing no one—and creating a life here. Working at a job I love, creating friends, and building something from the ground up. It makes me think I am capable of anything!

    This has prompted a lot of things from my mind, so I love it. Thanks for sharing and I hope you get that job :)

    • Matt Reply

      Well Grace, I actually didn’t get this job, so thank you very much for bringing up such a sensitive subject! (I kid, I kid). I really didn’t get this job, but between you-me, I think this was the type of company that wanted a more cut-and-dry ‘Graduating College is my biggest accomplishment’ type of answer, if you know what I mean. Let’s just say I know there’s something much better out there – and if I’m practicing what I preach, I know that everything is a learning experience. My chins’ held high.

      Your ‘restart button’ is exactly what I’m going through. It’s like looking at that big red button on the wall that says ‘DO NOT PUSH’ and then finally pushing it. There’s a lot up in the air, but I’m ready for the ‘next step’ – ready to accomplish new things and starting the next chapter of this thing we call life.

      Cheers to you Grace – I’m glad this has prompted some thought and inspiration for you.

  • Sam Reply

    I love that you told your own story here, but also recognized the accomplishments of the Twitter community, very cool! Pinpointing your “greatest accomplishment” when you’re only in your 20s is pretty difficult. I remember trying to prepare for this question before interviews and having a difficult time not sounding awkward. I think you answered the question very well. The ability to live in the moment without dwelling on the past is an amazing and admirable thing.

    I would say that my greatest accomplishment in life so far was graduating from college cum laude. I’ve never been someone who could half ass school and still get straight As. I had to work hard to do well, and I did. Due to certain circumstances, I didn’t start off college too well academically, but after struggling freshman year, I worked my butt off. Although some people enjoy slacking off senior year, I did the exact opposite, and it paid off. I was finally inducted into the communications honor society, and I pulled my GPA up enough to graduate with honors. Talk about ending college on a good note!

    Great post! You always find interesting ways to get people involved, and get the discussion going :)

    • Matt Reply

      @Sam – It sounds like we traveled down the same collegiate path. I absolutely tanked my Freshman year. Never failed a class, but came pretty damn close. This can be attributed to the partying, drinking, new-found freedom, and general not-giving-a-damn. As you (and everyone else knows) once your GPA is down, it takes forever to bring it back up. My last three years were spent busting my ass getting my GPA back up to a respectable level. It was a heck of an accomplishment for me to end up where I did as well.

      Living in the moment is easier said than done – we’re always going to dwell on the past and look to the future. But the more we can dedicate to the RIGHT NOW, the more we’ll really be able to get out of life.

  • Sam Reply

    I love that you told your own story here, but also recognized the accomplishments of the Twitter community, very cool! Pinpointing your “greatest accomplishment” when you’re only in your 20s is pretty difficult. I remember trying to prepare for this question before interviews and having a difficult time not sounding awkward. I think you answered the question very well. The ability to live in the moment without dwelling on the past is an amazing and admirable thing.

    I would say that my greatest accomplishment in life so far was graduating from college cum laude. I’ve never been someone who could half ass school and still get straight As. I had to work hard to do well, and I did. Due to certain circumstances, I didn’t start off college too well academically, but after struggling freshman year, I worked my butt off. Although some people enjoy slacking off senior year, I did the exact opposite, and it paid off. I was finally inducted into the communications honor society, and I pulled my GPA up enough to graduate with honors. Talk about ending college on a good note!

    Great post! You always find interesting ways to get people involved, and get the discussion going :)

    • Matt Reply

      @Sam – It sounds like we traveled down the same collegiate path. I absolutely tanked my Freshman year. Never failed a class, but came pretty damn close. This can be attributed to the partying, drinking, new-found freedom, and general not-giving-a-damn. As you (and everyone else knows) once your GPA is down, it takes forever to bring it back up. My last three years were spent busting my ass getting my GPA back up to a respectable level. It was a heck of an accomplishment for me to end up where I did as well.

      Living in the moment is easier said than done – we’re always going to dwell on the past and look to the future. But the more we can dedicate to the RIGHT NOW, the more we’ll really be able to get out of life.

  • Ana from far away Reply

    I bet the guy that was interviewing you was speechless after you answered that… That was awesome!!! I had a job interview a few weeks ago too, they didn’t asked me that though… it was a 45 min interview (the longest of my life), but I felt so comfortable there. It was a dream job interview, so I had a lot of pressure and a lot of competition, 130 people approx.

    My biggest accomplishment I can say it´s also this moment, because I got the job, I´m one of those lucky persons that can say they have a dream job. I was blessed enough, and good enough, to get this. Of all the people they interviewed, they chose me. All those years of effort and hard work are finally paying off. I don’t know what´s going to happen in the future, and I don’t really care. I finally got a chance to do what I want to do, and I know that after this job a lot of doors will open.

    I think I´m enjoying this so much, regardless of that fact that I´m nervous and have a lot of pressure, because I learned to be happy when my life was miserable and nobody was giving me an opportunity. So now that I actually have a reason to be happy, I´m like a thousand times more.

    Everything comes down to enjoying the moment and living in the present. Living in the past equals depression, living in the future equals anxiety…

    Your blog is awesome!

    • Matt Reply

      @Ana – First of all I have to say congratulations on getting the job – that’s awesome! I’m still waiting to have that ‘dream interview’ – like everyone else, I want nothing more than to find something that I love, something I’m passionate about and give my all to. It’s easier said than done, especially in this day and age, during this economic job recession. But I have faith that sooner (rather than later) I’ll be able to render an interviewer speechless with an insightful response like this. It’s a response that people will either get up and start clapping at, or say ‘that’s not the answer I was looking for’. I’m sure you know what I mean. I love your closing quote. ‘Living in the past equals depression, living in the future equals anxiety’ – It’s all about living in the moment.

      Thank you for sharing your story – and thanks for the kind words about the blog, I’m glad you’re a fan and I’m happy to have you contributing to the community atmosphere.

      • Ana from far away Reply

        I think that giving that answer is very important, because is like thinking out of the box. Everyone usually answers the same, always talking about the future: grad school, be successful, and so on.

        The important thing is to outstand, say something that will make them remember you when they are analyzing all those resumes.

        You are an excellent writer, so if you work as you write you won´t have any problem getting a dream job!

        • Matt Reply

          No doubt Ana – it’s all about standing out. It’s hard, if not impossible, to do that with a piece of paper (resume) so it all comes down to how you respond during an interview. Personally, I think the ‘traditional’ interview is extremely flawed – and that there are better ways to get to know someone/find out if they’re a good fit. For now I just go with it and do my best, but somewhere down the line, I’ll employ my non-traditional thinking into the hiring process. You know, once I’m in the big time and have my own company! :)

  • Ana from far away Reply

    I bet the guy that was interviewing you was speechless after you answered that… That was awesome!!! I had a job interview a few weeks ago too, they didn’t asked me that though… it was a 45 min interview (the longest of my life), but I felt so comfortable there. It was a dream job interview, so I had a lot of pressure and a lot of competition, 130 people approx.

    My biggest accomplishment I can say it´s also this moment, because I got the job, I´m one of those lucky persons that can say they have a dream job. I was blessed enough, and good enough, to get this. Of all the people they interviewed, they chose me. All those years of effort and hard work are finally paying off. I don’t know what´s going to happen in the future, and I don’t really care. I finally got a chance to do what I want to do, and I know that after this job a lot of doors will open.

    I think I´m enjoying this so much, regardless of that fact that I´m nervous and have a lot of pressure, because I learned to be happy when my life was miserable and nobody was giving me an opportunity. So now that I actually have a reason to be happy, I´m like a thousand times more.

    Everything comes down to enjoying the moment and living in the present. Living in the past equals depression, living in the future equals anxiety…

    Your blog is awesome!

    • Matt Reply

      @Ana – First of all I have to say congratulations on getting the job – that’s awesome! I’m still waiting to have that ‘dream interview’ – like everyone else, I want nothing more than to find something that I love, something I’m passionate about and give my all to. It’s easier said than done, especially in this day and age, during this economic job recession. But I have faith that sooner (rather than later) I’ll be able to render an interviewer speechless with an insightful response like this. It’s a response that people will either get up and start clapping at, or say ‘that’s not the answer I was looking for’. I’m sure you know what I mean. I love your closing quote. ‘Living in the past equals depression, living in the future equals anxiety’ – It’s all about living in the moment.

      Thank you for sharing your story – and thanks for the kind words about the blog, I’m glad you’re a fan and I’m happy to have you contributing to the community atmosphere.

      • Ana from far away Reply

        I think that giving that answer is very important, because is like thinking out of the box. Everyone usually answers the same, always talking about the future: grad school, be successful, and so on.

        The important thing is to outstand, say something that will make them remember you when they are analyzing all those resumes.

        You are an excellent writer, so if you work as you write you won´t have any problem getting a dream job!

        • Matt Reply

          No doubt Ana – it’s all about standing out. It’s hard, if not impossible, to do that with a piece of paper (resume) so it all comes down to how you respond during an interview. Personally, I think the ‘traditional’ interview is extremely flawed – and that there are better ways to get to know someone/find out if they’re a good fit. For now I just go with it and do my best, but somewhere down the line, I’ll employ my non-traditional thinking into the hiring process. You know, once I’m in the big time and have my own company! :)

  • Richard Reply

    (Twitter: @richarddedor)

    My greatest accomplishment (if I can permit myself to copy Matt’s a little bit…) is this moment in my life… the fact that I am still alive, still kicking, still living and chasing my dream. That is my greatest accomplishment.

    On a side note, allowing myself to be who I really am was a huge deal and this past week, June 17, I celebrated my third anniversary of coming out to my parents. It was hard, emotional and still to this day, tears me up how everything has gone. That said, I’m proud of who I am, proud that I am being me, and proud I’m alive today to talk about it. Nothing beats love… and at this point in my life, that is my great accomplishment.

    • Matt Reply

      @Richard – Congrats on having the courage to do what many cannot. That’s awesome! I know many who have been in that situation – and how ‘coming out’ and admitting who you are has been detrimental to the parent/child relationship. But, in the end, you have to be you, you can’t hide who you are, and love will conquer all – every single one of us should be looked at as equals – no matter who we go to bed with at the end of the day.

      It’s this moment that means everything. Living life to the fullest isn’t about the big picture, it’s about right now, about waking up this morning and knowing that it’s going to be a great day because I’m going to make it a great day. Cheers Richard – thanks for being a part of the community here!

  • Richard Reply

    (Twitter: @richarddedor)

    My greatest accomplishment (if I can permit myself to copy Matt’s a little bit…) is this moment in my life… the fact that I am still alive, still kicking, still living and chasing my dream. That is my greatest accomplishment.

    On a side note, allowing myself to be who I really am was a huge deal and this past week, June 17, I celebrated my third anniversary of coming out to my parents. It was hard, emotional and still to this day, tears me up how everything has gone. That said, I’m proud of who I am, proud that I am being me, and proud I’m alive today to talk about it. Nothing beats love… and at this point in my life, that is my great accomplishment.

    • Matt Reply

      @Richard – Congrats on having the courage to do what many cannot. That’s awesome! I know many who have been in that situation – and how ‘coming out’ and admitting who you are has been detrimental to the parent/child relationship. But, in the end, you have to be you, you can’t hide who you are, and love will conquer all – every single one of us should be looked at as equals – no matter who we go to bed with at the end of the day.

      It’s this moment that means everything. Living life to the fullest isn’t about the big picture, it’s about right now, about waking up this morning and knowing that it’s going to be a great day because I’m going to make it a great day. Cheers Richard – thanks for being a part of the community here!

  • Elisa Reply

    Wow, this is a tough question to get even over a blogpost, let alone in a job interview. Kudos for having the confidence and prowess to answer with such a great response. I know it doesn’t really matter, but I hire a lot for my job and that would have clinched it for me!

    As for me, I think I wrote something to you (in DM…if only I followed any sort of directions!) and in thinking it over more I’ve come to realize mine has two facets. The first is living my life to try to make a difference in every person I come into contact with’s life. I feel like this above all else is what makes someone successful. The second is more about me, and that is managing to bumble thru life being the beautiful disaster that I am and still managing to end almost every day with a smile. It takes a lot, but its an accomplishment to know that I’m finally coming into my own and being happy with the person that is (disaster or not!) :)

    • Matt Reply

      Agreed – it is an accomplishment in it of itself to be happy with who you are, flaws and all. If you can’t be happy with yourself – who can you be happy with?

      I pose a question to you. How do you go about making a difference in the lives of those around you? How are you proactive in impacting others? I look within myself and I see what I am doing here, using this online platform to spread my own beliefs and messages to the masses, hopefully inspiring, educating, and entertaining all of you who take 5-10 minutes out of your day to read this. It means a lot to me that you (all of you) go out of you way to come though here, especially those of you who stop and share your own insight and wisdom, so I do everything I can to continually encourage that, to invoke insightful though and engaging discussion and debate.

      Through it all, we grow, collectively. We open our minds to new ideas, we make friends, we have a place to feel accepted or even challenged. That’s what I do – that’s the footprint I’m leaving. It starts with this blog – and where it ends up – the sky is the limit. This is only the beginning for me.

  • Elisa Reply

    Wow, this is a tough question to get even over a blogpost, let alone in a job interview. Kudos for having the confidence and prowess to answer with such a great response. I know it doesn’t really matter, but I hire a lot for my job and that would have clinched it for me!

    As for me, I think I wrote something to you (in DM…if only I followed any sort of directions!) and in thinking it over more I’ve come to realize mine has two facets. The first is living my life to try to make a difference in every person I come into contact with’s life. I feel like this above all else is what makes someone successful. The second is more about me, and that is managing to bumble thru life being the beautiful disaster that I am and still managing to end almost every day with a smile. It takes a lot, but its an accomplishment to know that I’m finally coming into my own and being happy with the person that is (disaster or not!) :)

    • Matt Reply

      Agreed – it is an accomplishment in it of itself to be happy with who you are, flaws and all. If you can’t be happy with yourself – who can you be happy with?

      I pose a question to you. How do you go about making a difference in the lives of those around you? How are you proactive in impacting others? I look within myself and I see what I am doing here, using this online platform to spread my own beliefs and messages to the masses, hopefully inspiring, educating, and entertaining all of you who take 5-10 minutes out of your day to read this. It means a lot to me that you (all of you) go out of you way to come though here, especially those of you who stop and share your own insight and wisdom, so I do everything I can to continually encourage that, to invoke insightful though and engaging discussion and debate.

      Through it all, we grow, collectively. We open our minds to new ideas, we make friends, we have a place to feel accepted or even challenged. That’s what I do – that’s the footprint I’m leaving. It starts with this blog – and where it ends up – the sky is the limit. This is only the beginning for me.

  • Kristina Reply

    Wow, Matt. How do you do it? Such great posts every time. I don’t think it is even possible for me to leave a comment that will add anything to it. It was great to read everyone’s accomplishments and see the great things that people are doing. Hooray Matt for this post.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks Kristina! I owe this post to all of you who helped me put it together with some great accomplishments! Always great to bring people together to inspire and impact one another!

  • Kristina Reply

    Wow, Matt. How do you do it? Such great posts every time. I don’t think it is even possible for me to leave a comment that will add anything to it. It was great to read everyone’s accomplishments and see the great things that people are doing. Hooray Matt for this post.

    • Matt Cheuvront Reply

      Thanks Kristina! I owe this post to all of you who helped me put it together with some great accomplishments! Always great to bring people together to inspire and impact one another!

  • Munajibril Reply

    My greatest accomplishments is,i have bulied a business that i started with small money.

  • Nancy Perkins Reply

    Hi

    My greatest accomplishments are raising two great children, putting myself back in college and achieving a Liberal Arts degree along with becoming more confident about my decisions in life and much more as I could go on and on.

    Nancy P.

  • Ikrash Reply

    u00a0That in a two years time as a saleman i have started my own work and that i will take it to heights no one has ever reached

  • Denise Burgess Reply

    Your answer gave me goosebumps! But my answer will always be winning a prize for best alternative ending in the National Reading Competition in Jamaica at 11 years old. (SN: we had to rewrite the last chapter or so of a specific book the way we would have wanted it to end.) All I ever wanted to be at that age was a writer, and just knowing I wrote the best ending of all my peers in the competition still warms my heart (ten years later!) and reminds me that I can do what I set my mind to. Oh, I was also the overall winner for the competition, but I cared about the other prize more.

  • Lu00ecu00f1gu00e9s Mu00e4nu00ecu00e0m Reply

    what is your greatest accomplishment?

  • Diamond4966 Reply

    My greatest accomplishment is taking a leap of Faith and coming out of my shy shell. I get very intimidated by what people think about me. But I stepped out in Faith and I’m doing what the Lord has asked me to do. I help teach children’s church and help out with VBS. I also worship so freely infront of people and don’t worry what they think. I give God all the Glory  for giving me the strength to do this !!

  • Alena Reply

    Matt,
    I really enjoyed reading your story and posts that you have triggered by bringing this important question to attention.
    I would say that each of us has different accomplishments referring to different stages of life. But the bottom line however is how those accomplishments brought to where we are now.
    My greatest accomplishment is realizing that each of us can contribute to making a difference in the world. In my case, this is to have become a vegan and inspire the world around me to lead a healthier and more harmonious with the outside world way of life. I am proud of who I am no matter how many people would not understand it or try to criticize. I believe that we have to do what we believe in and what we think can bring the change to the world. This is the biggest accomplishment in my opinion.

  • Mai Reply

    I enjoyed your write up. Somehow I’m inspired to live my life to the fullest. Thanks for inspiring a lot of people.

  • yussuf mohamed Reply

    thanx alot.

  • Samantha Ong Reply

    My greatest accomplishment is to live… to be able to still do something about my unfulfilled dreams… to be able to breathe and enjoy every moment… after the waves being against me. after stones thrown at me. I LIVED.

  • Dominic Reply

    My greatest accomplishment in life,is the respect I have for others.Every person deserves gratitude for who they are and what they do.Some people do great things,and some people do ordinary everyday stuff,like take out the garbage and do the dishes,some people philosophise and give good advice.My greatest accomplishment is the considiration of every person as a indispensible assit to humanity.

  • anna Reply

    anna ” elsa?

    do you wanna build a snowman? come on lets go and play i never see you any more come out the door its like you’ve gone away. we used to be best buddies and now were not , i wish you’d tell me why. do you wanna build a snowman? it doesn’t have to be a snowman ” . elsa ”go away anna” anna ” o k by ”.

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