Soar through life!

Change scares me.

Most people I know are afraid of snakes or spiders or heights. But for me, these things are simple nuisances, minor annoyances that I can deal with.

Loss. Failure. Uncertainty. These are all abstract things I can’t reason, sometimes can’t understand, and most certainly can never control.

These are the things that scare me.

And these tend to be a product of change.

Doctors and scientists agree that people tend to have one of two reactions when placed in a threatening situation: adrenaline tells them to either fight or take flight. I’ve always perceived change as my greatest threat for what I thought it meant. And so my first impulse has always been to fight that change, kicking and screaming every step of the way, trying whatever I could to hang on to what I had,  to prevent that change from happening. I always associated change with something bad.

When we look back, my parents and I can point my panic disorder all the way back to kindergarten, where I would abruptly burst into tears at the very thought of my mom leaving me. But it wasn’t until my junior year in high school that it really came back in full-force, affecting me, impacting my life in such a negative way.

Nearly every single day for an entire semester I would leave my house for the less than five mile drive to school. And every single day I would turn the car around and drive back home, a sense of overwhelming despair and shaking fear clouding my mind and removing any semblance of rational thought. I was nearly eighteen years old at the time. I felt like I was four again as I retreated to the safest place I knew, begging my dad not to leave for work, begging my mom not to make me leave the house. The problem wasn’t where I was going but, rather, what I would be leaving. I feared that something would happen, something would change, and I wouldn’t be ready for it, wouldn’t be prepared.

This irrational, emotional part of me believed that if I remained in my comfort zone, then maybe I could somehow prevent whatever change was looming ahead from actually happening; I thought I could somehow remain safe and cocooned with everyone safe and cocooned with me.

Sometimes, though, there is loss that you can’t prevent, no matter how much you beg or pray or how secure your cocoon seems to be. Sometimes there is disappointment and regret and failure no matter how much you plan.

Sometimes things happen that you can’t predict, that you can’t ever be ready for.

With change, maybe you never really are.

But maybe, just maybe, life isn’t really about that, after all.

The idea of change used to scare me because it was something I couldn’t control and I always associated it with loss, failure, and uncertainty. But now I see that change doesn’t have to be equated with fear, but rather opportunity.

Some of my greatest learning experiences and proudest accomplishments have occurred due to a change I wasn’t entirely prepared for, but I pushed through that fear anyway. And it has sometimes taken all of my strength and courage and every last member of my support network, and I may have resisted it all the way, but what I’ve found is that once I accept it, once that fear and anticipation passes, once the change comes, as it always does, I’m able to pick myself up and continue on.

I fight change every single step of the way.

But when I stop resisting, when I open myself up to the possibility…That’s when I soar.

Photo courtesy McMorr

Susan (twentyorsomething)Author Bio: Susan, in a nutshell, is a passionate and inspirational writer, and more importantly an amazing person. With all this talk about personal blogging vs. personal branding, she seamlessly is able to blur that line and relate her personal experiences with the ‘big picture’. She is an avid writer at her blog(s) Typescript and Twenty(or)Something – I encourage you to check out both, and if you haven’t already, reach out and say hello to Susan today!

Join the conversation! 38 Comments

  1. Hi Susan,

    Thank you for writing this. This piece really made me think of all the good things that have happened in my life since I a took the leap of faith and made the biggest change in my life. While my anxiety issues were not as severe, I also had a similar problem of being unable to leave places where I felt safe and in control. For the longest time, I wouldn’t do anything without excessive planning for fear that something would go wrong and I wouldn’t be able to handle it but time and time again I proved to myself that when the going gets tough, I just get tougher.

    I’m glad that you’re able to move forward and really get to know yourself and your unlimited capabilities. It’s really inspiring and rather touching. So thanks again. :)

    Cheers,

    Mandy.

    Reply
    • Mandy,

      I really appreciate your comment, especially your willingness to share your own story — I can’t tell you how much I relate to your words. When you say that you planned excessively, I feel like that’s echoing my own thoughts or, at least, how I used to be. I wanted to take into account every single scenario so that I wouldn’t be caught off-guard, so that I would be prepared for whatever came. It was a huge lesson to learn, as I’m sure you well know, that you can’t always plan for change, that sometimes you just have to let go of that control. And amazing things really can happen once you kind of let life surprise you.

      I love how you say that when the going gets tough, you just got tougher, and I’m so glad that you were able to work through this often difficult situation yourself and find that change can really be a precursor to something positive.

      Thanks so much, Mandy, and wishing you the very, very best!

      Reply
  2. Hi Susan,

    Thank you for writing this. This piece really made me think of all the good things that have happened in my life since I a took the leap of faith and made the biggest change in my life. While my anxiety issues were not as severe, I also had a similar problem of being unable to leave places where I felt safe and in control. For the longest time, I wouldn’t do anything without excessive planning for fear that something would go wrong and I wouldn’t be able to handle it but time and time again I proved to myself that when the going gets tough, I just get tougher.

    I’m glad that you’re able to move forward and really get to know yourself and your unlimited capabilities. It’s really inspiring and rather touching. So thanks again. :)

    Cheers,

    Mandy.

    Reply
    • Mandy,

      I really appreciate your comment, especially your willingness to share your own story — I can’t tell you how much I relate to your words. When you say that you planned excessively, I feel like that’s echoing my own thoughts or, at least, how I used to be. I wanted to take into account every single scenario so that I wouldn’t be caught off-guard, so that I would be prepared for whatever came. It was a huge lesson to learn, as I’m sure you well know, that you can’t always plan for change, that sometimes you just have to let go of that control. And amazing things really can happen once you kind of let life surprise you.

      I love how you say that when the going gets tough, you just got tougher, and I’m so glad that you were able to work through this often difficult situation yourself and find that change can really be a precursor to something positive.

      Thanks so much, Mandy, and wishing you the very, very best!

      Reply
  3. Thanks for revealing your own story about resistance to change and the fear and panic you fought when going through it. I know it’s not easy and really, so many people feel that way or struggle with it. It’s such a good feeling when you take a deep breath and are actually able to let it go.

    I think realizing, like you said, that sometimes you may never be ready for change or even that you can’t predict when it’s going to come your way. It’s an honest assertion and it doesn’t have to be negative, just realizing is half the battle. Great post!

    Reply
    • Grace,

      Thanks so much for your comment! I think you’re absolutely right — that resistance to change and that fear of the unknown is something that really everyone goes through, on some level, at some point in their lives. I think the thought of giving up that control on your own life and letting things go is probably the scariest part, but one of the things I’ve realized is that we’re still in control of our own lives. We may not be able to control the changes that occur or be entirely prepared for them, but we can control our reactions to those changes. And, you’re right, it doesn’t have to be negative.

      I clung to the negative for so long, that it’s pretty cool to see what can happen when you look at it from a positive perspective. Thanks for reminding me of these lessons, Grace, and thanks again for your comment!

      Reply
  4. Thanks for revealing your own story about resistance to change and the fear and panic you fought when going through it. I know it’s not easy and really, so many people feel that way or struggle with it. It’s such a good feeling when you take a deep breath and are actually able to let it go.

    I think realizing, like you said, that sometimes you may never be ready for change or even that you can’t predict when it’s going to come your way. It’s an honest assertion and it doesn’t have to be negative, just realizing is half the battle. Great post!

    Reply
    • Grace,

      Thanks so much for your comment! I think you’re absolutely right — that resistance to change and that fear of the unknown is something that really everyone goes through, on some level, at some point in their lives. I think the thought of giving up that control on your own life and letting things go is probably the scariest part, but one of the things I’ve realized is that we’re still in control of our own lives. We may not be able to control the changes that occur or be entirely prepared for them, but we can control our reactions to those changes. And, you’re right, it doesn’t have to be negative.

      I clung to the negative for so long, that it’s pretty cool to see what can happen when you look at it from a positive perspective. Thanks for reminding me of these lessons, Grace, and thanks again for your comment!

      Reply
  5. I second Grace’s thanks for telling your story. I think that because change is often difficult and challenging, people assume it has negative connotations. But, this is not always the case, and even if the process of changing has some negative aspects to it, this does not mean that the end result won’t be worth it. In fact, the most difficult changes tend to be the most rewarding as well. Great post!

    Reply
    • Sam,

      Thanks so much for the encouragement! I think you’re entire comment is right on, especially when you say “the most difficult changes tend to be the most rewarding.” I’ve noticed this tends to be the trend in my own life, and I certainly hope that you can look back on your own situations and feel proud for all that you may have faced. I think change happens whether you want it to or not, and maybe, like I said in response to Grace’s comment, it’s all about how you handle it.

      Thanks again, Sam!

      Reply
  6. I second Grace’s thanks for telling your story. I think that because change is often difficult and challenging, people assume it has negative connotations. But, this is not always the case, and even if the process of changing has some negative aspects to it, this does not mean that the end result won’t be worth it. In fact, the most difficult changes tend to be the most rewarding as well. Great post!

    Reply
    • Sam,

      Thanks so much for the encouragement! I think you’re entire comment is right on, especially when you say “the most difficult changes tend to be the most rewarding.” I’ve noticed this tends to be the trend in my own life, and I certainly hope that you can look back on your own situations and feel proud for all that you may have faced. I think change happens whether you want it to or not, and maybe, like I said in response to Grace’s comment, it’s all about how you handle it.

      Thanks again, Sam!

      Reply
  7. This was a great post. It’s almost as if we shared a brain, I went to college 3 miles from my house, and for the first semester i couldn’t do it either. i would panic and wonder what horror was in store for me. after a while, i realized college was a docile beast i could tame….airplanes…well those still leave me kicking and screaming.’

    but u are right, it’s when we give into that fear, that we leave ourselves open for amazing experiences. i just wish it were a lot easier and i didn’t panic so much.

    ahhh, to be human. again, great post!

    Reply
  8. This was a great post. It’s almost as if we shared a brain, I went to college 3 miles from my house, and for the first semester i couldn’t do it either. i would panic and wonder what horror was in store for me. after a while, i realized college was a docile beast i could tame….airplanes…well those still leave me kicking and screaming.’

    but u are right, it’s when we give into that fear, that we leave ourselves open for amazing experiences. i just wish it were a lot easier and i didn’t panic so much.

    ahhh, to be human. again, great post!

    Reply
  9. I had a LOT of anxiety my senior year of high school in anticipation of what was next, leaving my friends and family for college, etc. Since I’ve become a lot more accustomed to change. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still scary, but I thought I might cry and hyperventilate all the way to North Carolina from Texas, but I didn’t, I was excited about the opportunity that awaited me. Nervous, yes. Terrified, yes. But also excited.

    Thanks so much for sharing your story and experiences with resistance to change. I wish this was something I could impress on my little sister. I think she misses out on so much because she’s scared to step outside of her comfort zone.

    I try to tell her that you sometimes have to open yourself up to the risk of disappointment to truly achieve great things. This goes from meeting new people, to trying a new sport/hobby, attending a conference, the first time you visit Uptown, NC all my yourself.

    Looking back, some of the moments I’m most proud of started as events that I was terrified of, resisted and pushed back refusing to do. Once I relinquished the fight and just did them, they were (a complete blur) and so much fun!

    Love your stories and insights Susan!

    Reply
    • Ryan,

      Your story is one that you should be so proud of as well because I can only imagine how that must have felt to move away. Talk about a huge change! It’s true that people do it everyday and make it look so easy, but I wonder if it really is as easy as it seems. It’s exciting, it’s new, but, at the same time, it’s exciting and new, precisely, so that might mean a little bit scary.

      I’m so glad that you saw it as an opportunity, and I’m so glad that you can be an example for your sister.

      Thanks, Ryan! I wish you the best of continued luck in NC!

      Reply
  10. I had a LOT of anxiety my senior year of high school in anticipation of what was next, leaving my friends and family for college, etc. Since I’ve become a lot more accustomed to change. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still scary, but I thought I might cry and hyperventilate all the way to North Carolina from Texas, but I didn’t, I was excited about the opportunity that awaited me. Nervous, yes. Terrified, yes. But also excited.

    Thanks so much for sharing your story and experiences with resistance to change. I wish this was something I could impress on my little sister. I think she misses out on so much because she’s scared to step outside of her comfort zone.

    I try to tell her that you sometimes have to open yourself up to the risk of disappointment to truly achieve great things. This goes from meeting new people, to trying a new sport/hobby, attending a conference, the first time you visit Uptown, NC all my yourself.

    Looking back, some of the moments I’m most proud of started as events that I was terrified of, resisted and pushed back refusing to do. Once I relinquished the fight and just did them, they were (a complete blur) and so much fun!

    Love your stories and insights Susan!

    Reply
    • Ryan,

      Your story is one that you should be so proud of as well because I can only imagine how that must have felt to move away. Talk about a huge change! It’s true that people do it everyday and make it look so easy, but I wonder if it really is as easy as it seems. It’s exciting, it’s new, but, at the same time, it’s exciting and new, precisely, so that might mean a little bit scary.

      I’m so glad that you saw it as an opportunity, and I’m so glad that you can be an example for your sister.

      Thanks, Ryan! I wish you the best of continued luck in NC!

      Reply
  11. Sam,

    Thanks for sharing your experiences! I hate to see that others can relate on that same level, though it’s admittedly a comfort to know that you’re not alone. I’m so glad that you were able to overcome that fear — I think your last line is the most telling. It’s human, maybe somewhat natural, to want to resist change or even hide away from it. I hate to think of where we would be if we gave into that.

    Thanks for a great comment, Sam, and wishing you the best!

    Reply
  12. Sam,

    Thanks for sharing your experiences! I hate to see that others can relate on that same level, though it’s admittedly a comfort to know that you’re not alone. I’m so glad that you were able to overcome that fear — I think your last line is the most telling. It’s human, maybe somewhat natural, to want to resist change or even hide away from it. I hate to think of where we would be if we gave into that.

    Thanks for a great comment, Sam, and wishing you the best!

    Reply
  13. Susan, thanks for your transparency. It’s unfortunate that so many of us grow up with deep fears that control of lives. Self-honesty really does a world of good, though, to examine what’s holding us back from those possibilities. There’s nothing more challenging than conquering your fears, though it often only takes a change in perspective.

    At the cliffs on the lake, my husband met a little girl who repeatedly jumped from the highest point. When asked why she was so fearless in spite of the long fall, she replied: I don’t think about falling, I think about flying.

    Pretty brilliant for a 9 yr old. By controlling her thoughts, she controlled her fear and opened herself up to a thrilling experience. Susan, I hope you continue to enjoy the freedom of flight. :)

    Reply
    • Chelsie,

      I love everything about your comment. That story is beautiful and just speaks volumes. I can only hope to remember it and gain that same perspective. I really can’t add anything to that thought — it’s just incredible as is, but I appreciate you sharing it.

      Thanks so much for that and for your well wishes. They’re absolutely returned :)

      Reply
  14. Susan, thanks for your transparency. It’s unfortunate that so many of us grow up with deep fears that control of lives. Self-honesty really does a world of good, though, to examine what’s holding us back from those possibilities. There’s nothing more challenging than conquering your fears, though it often only takes a change in perspective.

    At the cliffs on the lake, my husband met a little girl who repeatedly jumped from the highest point. When asked why she was so fearless in spite of the long fall, she replied: I don’t think about falling, I think about flying.

    Pretty brilliant for a 9 yr old. By controlling her thoughts, she controlled her fear and opened herself up to a thrilling experience. Susan, I hope you continue to enjoy the freedom of flight. :)

    Reply
    • Chelsie,

      I love everything about your comment. That story is beautiful and just speaks volumes. I can only hope to remember it and gain that same perspective. I really can’t add anything to that thought — it’s just incredible as is, but I appreciate you sharing it.

      Thanks so much for that and for your well wishes. They’re absolutely returned :)

      Reply
  15. Susan, this is such a beautiful post. Your story is touching, and your writing is wonderful.

    After going to the same school since I was 3 months old, I remember crying when I had to leave it to go to a different highschool. I actually used to escape from class to go visit my old friends. My dad convinced me to give it a shot and if I wasn’t happy at the end of the year, he would change me back.

    I adored it. When I started seeing it as an opportunity, as you well put it, it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

    What I take from this post is this: Life is not about being ready. That’s so insightful and mature. We actually tend to focus all our efforts on the contrary. And can you ever be ready? Is that even possible?

    We control so little, that the only thing that we have to be ready for is change.

    Amazing Susan. Loved it!

    Reply
    • Carlos,

      I love how people are so willing to share their personal stories because it really does show you that everyone can relate. I’ve always loved your take on change — you embrace it and you recognize it for the opportunity that it can provide, and maybe that comes from your personal experience as well. It’s not so easy, as I think everyone who is a part of this amazing series that Matt has created can attest. And sometimes you can only see the opportunity is hindsight, as seems to be the case in your story.

      But I think I’m beginning to believe that change happens for a reason, and ready or not, it’s going to come. I only hope that I can learn to fully embrace the changes that are inevitable and see them for the positive effect that they can really have.

      Thanks, Carlos, and best to you!

      Reply
  16. Susan, this is such a beautiful post. Your story is touching, and your writing is wonderful.

    After going to the same school since I was 3 months old, I remember crying when I had to leave it to go to a different highschool. I actually used to escape from class to go visit my old friends. My dad convinced me to give it a shot and if I wasn’t happy at the end of the year, he would change me back.

    I adored it. When I started seeing it as an opportunity, as you well put it, it was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made.

    What I take from this post is this: Life is not about being ready. That’s so insightful and mature. We actually tend to focus all our efforts on the contrary. And can you ever be ready? Is that even possible?

    We control so little, that the only thing that we have to be ready for is change.

    Amazing Susan. Loved it!

    Reply
    • Carlos,

      I love how people are so willing to share their personal stories because it really does show you that everyone can relate. I’ve always loved your take on change — you embrace it and you recognize it for the opportunity that it can provide, and maybe that comes from your personal experience as well. It’s not so easy, as I think everyone who is a part of this amazing series that Matt has created can attest. And sometimes you can only see the opportunity is hindsight, as seems to be the case in your story.

      But I think I’m beginning to believe that change happens for a reason, and ready or not, it’s going to come. I only hope that I can learn to fully embrace the changes that are inevitable and see them for the positive effect that they can really have.

      Thanks, Carlos, and best to you!

      Reply
  17. Susan – as I said when you first sent me this post to review, THANK YOU for writing this. As someone who is going through and struggling to overcome obstacles in my own life, someone who is staring change directly in the face and battling between resisting or embracing it, I needed to read this – I needed to know I’m not alone in all this, that others are going through or have gone through the same thing, that others have stared out into the unknown and taken the leap of faith.

    I think a lot of people reading this, a lot of people involved in this ‘mission’ are in the same situation as you and I. Graduating college, entering into a workforce and job market that is absolutely brutal, wanting to follow our passions but not really knowing how, developing in our relationships, growing about from our friends, becoming independent. It’s scary – it can be downright terrifying. I worry all the time, I second guess and question myself – it’s inevitable, it makes you human.

    But, as you said, it’s when we stop resiting and start embracing, fighting through it so we CAN fly, so we can soar, that we become the greatest version of ourselves. It’s the moment that we stop trying and start doing, saying yes instead of maybe, that we’re able to shake off our fears and really become ‘all we can be’.

    Thank you for this – we needed a splash of personality and honesty to this series, and you provided just that. I hate to say I told you so, but I told you that everyone reading this would be able to connect their own stories with yours. Much obliged to have you involved in this series!

    Reply
    • Matt,

      You can say “I told you so” on this one, it’s absolutely allowed (and expected!). I think I always knew that a fear of change was somewhat natural — there’s always hesitation with everything that change can possibly bring, for what it could mean. However, I think that’s just it. For so long, I associated change with something negative because that had been my experience. When you turn that around, when you view things as opportunities rather than obstacles, when you embrace rather than resist, that’s when you begin to realize that change can be welcomed because it means there’s a chance for something to be learned, something better.

      You’re right on when you say it’s when this happens that we become the greatest version of ourselves. Pretty incredible.

      Thank you, Matt, for sharing this part of yourself and for opening the door that allows all of us to connect. I think I always knew that everyone experienced this hesitation or fear on some level, though I never quite realized how deep that level really is. Whether it’s personal experiences or a desire for social change, on a larger scale, change is something that is happening around us everyday, that impacts each and every one of us. I love how you’ve bridged that gap, welcomed perspectives, insight and, most importantly, conversation.

      This is truly a remarkable series with so many smart, talented, and insightful writers. I feel so honored to have been able to share a small part of it.

      Wishing you all the best.

      Reply
      • Susan – it was a pleasure to have you and everyone else along for this journey – I think it enabled me to become transparent as a blogger, writer, and human being, something that is important for all of us – keeping some mystery, but opening ourselves up and allowing others to take a peek at who we are and what we’re passionate about.

        I was happy to facilitate so many engaging conversations and I’m excited about what other people this series will touch in the future. Here’s to many more exciting conversations to be had in the future!

        Reply
  18. Susan – as I said when you first sent me this post to review, THANK YOU for writing this. As someone who is going through and struggling to overcome obstacles in my own life, someone who is staring change directly in the face and battling between resisting or embracing it, I needed to read this – I needed to know I’m not alone in all this, that others are going through or have gone through the same thing, that others have stared out into the unknown and taken the leap of faith.

    I think a lot of people reading this, a lot of people involved in this ‘mission’ are in the same situation as you and I. Graduating college, entering into a workforce and job market that is absolutely brutal, wanting to follow our passions but not really knowing how, developing in our relationships, growing about from our friends, becoming independent. It’s scary – it can be downright terrifying. I worry all the time, I second guess and question myself – it’s inevitable, it makes you human.

    But, as you said, it’s when we stop resiting and start embracing, fighting through it so we CAN fly, so we can soar, that we become the greatest version of ourselves. It’s the moment that we stop trying and start doing, saying yes instead of maybe, that we’re able to shake off our fears and really become ‘all we can be’.

    Thank you for this – we needed a splash of personality and honesty to this series, and you provided just that. I hate to say I told you so, but I told you that everyone reading this would be able to connect their own stories with yours. Much obliged to have you involved in this series!

    Reply
    • Matt,

      You can say “I told you so” on this one, it’s absolutely allowed (and expected!). I think I always knew that a fear of change was somewhat natural — there’s always hesitation with everything that change can possibly bring, for what it could mean. However, I think that’s just it. For so long, I associated change with something negative because that had been my experience. When you turn that around, when you view things as opportunities rather than obstacles, when you embrace rather than resist, that’s when you begin to realize that change can be welcomed because it means there’s a chance for something to be learned, something better.

      You’re right on when you say it’s when this happens that we become the greatest version of ourselves. Pretty incredible.

      Thank you, Matt, for sharing this part of yourself and for opening the door that allows all of us to connect. I think I always knew that everyone experienced this hesitation or fear on some level, though I never quite realized how deep that level really is. Whether it’s personal experiences or a desire for social change, on a larger scale, change is something that is happening around us everyday, that impacts each and every one of us. I love how you’ve bridged that gap, welcomed perspectives, insight and, most importantly, conversation.

      This is truly a remarkable series with so many smart, talented, and insightful writers. I feel so honored to have been able to share a small part of it.

      Wishing you all the best.

      Reply
      • Susan – it was a pleasure to have you and everyone else along for this journey – I think it enabled me to become transparent as a blogger, writer, and human being, something that is important for all of us – keeping some mystery, but opening ourselves up and allowing others to take a peek at who we are and what we’re passionate about.

        I was happy to facilitate so many engaging conversations and I’m excited about what other people this series will touch in the future. Here’s to many more exciting conversations to be had in the future!

        Reply
  19. Susan, thank you for sharing your personal story with us. Really touching and an genuine inspiration to many going through similar challenges.

    This series has been a real eye-opener for me and with every post I discover how we are all more alike than different, sharing similar fears and challenges.

    This line really hit it home for me: “I fight change every single step of the way. But when I stop resisting, when I open myself up to the possibility … That’s when I soar.”

    Awesome! Right on the mark! The moment when we let go, stop resisting, stop draining our energy, that turning point, it really feels like soaring, like a weight lifted, shackles untangled. Wonderful!

    Thank you again for sharing this amazing journey with us :)

    Reply
    • Shereen – All I’ve got to say to you is as soon as your ‘real life’ settles down, we’ve got to get you set up with a blog of your own. In short, you ‘get it’ – you’re a good writer and most importantly, you know how to connect with your readers. I’m looking forward to being a part of that journey for you in the future.

      Until then – please don’t stop coming through here and sharing your insight on any and all discussions. There’s always a place for you here!

      Reply
  20. Susan, thank you for sharing your personal story with us. Really touching and an genuine inspiration to many going through similar challenges.

    This series has been a real eye-opener for me and with every post I discover how we are all more alike than different, sharing similar fears and challenges.

    This line really hit it home for me: “I fight change every single step of the way. But when I stop resisting, when I open myself up to the possibility … That’s when I soar.”

    Awesome! Right on the mark! The moment when we let go, stop resisting, stop draining our energy, that turning point, it really feels like soaring, like a weight lifted, shackles untangled. Wonderful!

    Thank you again for sharing this amazing journey with us :)

    Reply
    • Shereen – All I’ve got to say to you is as soon as your ‘real life’ settles down, we’ve got to get you set up with a blog of your own. In short, you ‘get it’ – you’re a good writer and most importantly, you know how to connect with your readers. I’m looking forward to being a part of that journey for you in the future.

      Until then – please don’t stop coming through here and sharing your insight on any and all discussions. There’s always a place for you here!

      Reply

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About Matt Cheuvront

I empower folks to do the work they want to do and live the life they want to live. Connect on Twitter or check out the work I'm doing at Proof.

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The Inconvenience of Change

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